Question about Hitachi 50V500 50 in. HD-Ready LCD Television

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Stuck Pixel I have one single stuck pixel. it is only noticeable on a dark background. What part would need to be replaced to fix this?

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  • scuba811 Feb 08, 2008

    Thanks, but this is an LCD projection, not DLP. It's not under warranty either. I regularly work on LCD and Plasma tv's, so I figured if I could find the part to fix it, I'd give it a try.

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  • 261 Answers

THE DLP CHIP. Is the set still under warranty? And if it is they are going to tell you it is within specifications. Especially if it is in the B ZONE. which means not in the middle basically. If it is under warranty and it is in the middle of the screen then they will most likely exchange the "Light Engine". Good luck and let me know how that works out for you...Thank you Guru Jay

Posted on Feb 08, 2008

  • Jay Henderson
    Jay Henderson Feb 08, 2008

    Oh, i missed that, still you have a pixel that is stuck on on one of the LCD panels on the LIGHT engine. You could fix it but it probably wouldn't be worth it for 1 pixel. Good day. Sorry about the confusion. Guru Jay

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Getting a black spot on one corner of picture. Any suggestions why this is happening?


It is not unusual for a camera's sensor to have a pixel fail this way. Most sensors consist of 100's of thousands or more pixels that make up the sensor. Each responds to the color and intensity of the light projected upon it by the lens. It sounds like a pixel on your sensor has failed and is "dead" or "stuck" in a dark state. Pixels can fail "hot" on a single color, too.

The bad news is that it is not possible to fix a stuck pixel. The sensor itself is the smallest replaceable part and is often times not worth the expense of replacing. Compare costs of replacing the part vs the cost of replacing the camera and decide which way to go to be sure.

I did see some Minolta specific info that you might want to look at first here.

The good news is that there is software that will allow you to mask the pixel. Google search for "stuck pixel software" for a list of results. The software analyzes the pixels around the non-functioning pixel, and makes it a color that is far less likely to be noticed. Other software may perform functions that restore functionality to the pixel and others still that do something else. I am unsure of how well the former methods work or how long they might work. Software that changes the output file is the type I used and it seemed to work well. Each file needed to be run thru the software to make the change however.

Good luck!

Sep 12, 2013 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3 Digital Camera

2 Answers

White spot on screen


Sounds like you are describing stuck/dead pixel.

There is no fix, it is a Pixel gone out in display panel, good chance it is just stuck and will right itself but sadly sometimes they dont and the only fix is to replace the entire display panel
Manufactures warrant such defects different depending on amount of dead pixels on screen is considered faulty, ie 3 pixels grouped or 5 separate ones .

Jan 12, 2008 | Samsung HL-P6163W 61" TV

Tip

Why the white or black spot on LCD Display


Dead and Stuck Pixels <br /> Pixel defects for an LCD monitor are defined as one of two types: dead or stuck. Technically, both types of pixel defects are stuck pixels but it really deals with the electrical currents and the state of each pixel or sub-pixel. <br /> A dead pixel is defined as a pixel or set of sub-pixels that has failed and is permanently in the off position. This condition means that the pixel will not let any light through. This can be observed as a dark or black spot on a brightly colored or white background. <br /> A stuck pixel is defined as a pixel or sub-pixel that has failed and is permanently in the on position. This can be either with a single or multiple sub-pixels for a given pixel and is best observed on a dark or black background. A white pixel means all three sub-pixels have failed while a green, red or blue pixel means one of the sub-pixels has failed. <br /> Hope this helps, if so do rate the Tip

on Jan 16, 2011 | Televison & Video

Tip

How to fix a dead or stuck pixel on an LCD screen


A dead or stuck pixel on an LCD screen or TFT can be incredibly annoying. You'll be staring at it for days on end, wondering for how long you'll be without your screen or maybe your entire laptop if you decided to turn it in for repair or replacement. All that grieve over something as unimportant, yet highly irritating as a malfunctioning pixel.<br /> Before you run the item back to the store though, you should try to see whether you can fix it yourself! This, if done carefully, will not hamper your warranty and might save you a lot of time and worries. So let's see what you can do yourself.<br /> Let me say that any new LCD or TFT monitor should be tested for pixel errors. This can be done simply by running it through a palette of basic colors and black and white in full screen mode. The software, which we'll get to in a second, can do that.<br /> First let me explain what you may be seeing. Is it just a stuck pixel or is it in fact dead? A stuck pixel will appear in any of the colors that its three subpixels (red, green and blue) can form, depending on their functionality and brightness. In a dead pixel all subpixels are permanently off, which will make the pixel appear black. This may result from a broken transistor, in rare cases however even a black pixel may just be stuck. So if you're seeing a colored or white pixel, your chances are pretty good and if it's black, there is still hope.<br /> Let's turn to the software now. If you're not on Windows, scroll down for some online tools!<br /> <b><a href="http://udpix.free.fr/">UDPixel</a> (Windows)</b> I recommend UDPixel to quickly identify and fix pixels using a single tool. The program requires .NET Framework 2.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel02.png" /> With the dead pixel locator on the left you can easily detect any screen irregularity that may have escaped your vision until now. Should you have identified a suspicious pixel, switch to the undead pixel option, create sufficient amounts of flash windows (one per stuck pixel) and hit start. You can drag the tiny flashing windows to where you found the pixel in question. Let it run for a while and eventually change the flash interval.<br /> <b><a href="http://flexcode.org/lcd.html">LCD</a> (online)</b> This is one tool that lets you find and eventually fix stuck pixels. It packs many options into a singly tiny window, but once you have an overview it's straightforward and easy to use.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel06.png" /> To test the screen click the small 'pick a color' box. The colors you should test are red, green and blue. Additionally you should test white and black. Follow the instructions in the box to gain the best results.<br /> <b><a href="http://tft.vanity.dk/">Online Monitor Test</a> (Online)</b> This is a very thorough test not only meant to identify bad pixels, but also powerful enough to test the quality of your monitor. You can choose between three different modes to test your monitor. This tool either requires flash (online version) or it can be installed in the executable mode.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel03.png" /> What you will need to just test for stuck pixels is the HTML window. Toggle full screen by hitting F11. What you will see is displayed below.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel04.png" /> Move the mouse to the top of the test window and a menu will appear. There is an info window that you can turn off with a button in the top right of the menu. Then click on the homogenity test point and move through the three colors as well as black and white. Fingers crossed you won't discover anything out of the ordinary. In the unfortunate case that you do, you may find the following online tool helpful.<br /> <b><a href="http://www.jscreenfix.com/basic.php">JScreenFix</a> (Online)</b> Alternatively, and if you're not using Windows XP, you can use the online tool JScreenFix which launches a Java applet to fix stuck pixel.<br /> <p><img src="fixpixel05.png" /> The tool launches a small applet in a separate browser window and you can drag the window to the respective spot or run it in full screen.<br /> Hands On (Offline) Should none of these tools resolve your pixel issue, there is one last chance. You can combine any of the tools and the magic power of your own hands. There is a very good description of all available techniques on <a href="http://www.wikihow.com/Fix-a-Stuck-Pixel-on-an-LCD-Monitor">wikiHow</a>. Another great step by step guide can be found on <a href="http://www.instructables.com/id/Fix-a-stuck-pixel-on-an-LCD-monitor/">instructables</a>.<br /> But let's go through one technique real quick:<br /> <ol> <li>Turn off your monitor.</li> <li>Get yourself a damp cloth, so that you won't scratch the screen.</li> <li>Apply pressure to the area where the stuck pixel is. Try not to put pressure anywhere else, as this may trigger the creation of more stuck pixels.</li> <li>While applying pressure, turn on your computer and screen.</li> <li>Remove pressure and the stuck pixel should be gone.</li></ol> This works because in a stuck pixel liquid in a subpixel has not spread equally. In combination with the backlight of your screen, this liquid is used to allow different amounts of light to pass through, which creates the different colors.<br /> Should all of these approaches fail to fix your pixel warrior, at least you'll now know it's not simple to fix and the LCD may indeed need to be replaced. But please do let us know if these tips helped you to fix your pixels. In any case, good luck!

on Jan 04, 2011 | Sony KDF-E55A20 55 in. LCD Television

1 Answer

How can you fix dead pixel?


FIXING DEAD PIXELS These WEB site gives instruction on removing dead pixels, but there is no guarantee it will work except replacing the LCD screen.
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/best-software-solutions-to-fix-a-stuck-pixel-on-your-lcd-monitor/
http://komku.blogspot.com.au/2008/03/dead-pixel-on-your-laptop-screen-how-to.html

Nov 27, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How to fix a stuck pixel


You can't fix a pixel, it is a display failure and the screen must be replaced.

Feb 06, 2012 | YOBO FC-16 Go Portable SNES System

1 Answer

My brand new LG 37' Led/Lcd t.v. had four very light white spots that you can see in the background what causes this?


Hello
Dead and Stuck Pixels
Pixel defects for an LCD monitor are defined as one of two types: dead or stuck. Technically, both types of pixel defects are stuck pixels but it really deals with the electrical currents and the state of each pixel or sub-pixel.
A dead pixel is defined as a pixel or set of sub-pixels that has failed and is permanently in the off position. This condition means that the pixel will not let any light through. This can be observed as a dark or black spot on a brightly colored or white background.
A stuck pixel is defined as a pixel or sub-pixel that has failed and is permanently in the on position. This can be either with a single or multiple sub-pixels for a given pixel and is best observed on a dark or black background. A white pixel means all three sub-pixels have failed while a green, red or blue pixel means one of the sub-pixels has failed.
Hope this helps, if so do rate the solution

Jan 16, 2011 | LG 37LC7D 37 in. LCD HDTV

1 Answer

Canon power shot sd1000 black dot on lens


If by saying the upper right corner of the lens you really mean that there is a dark spot on each image AND the rear display, there may be dirt or dust on the lens itself. Clean the lens with an optical quality cleaner. Do not use paper towels and Windex or the like - as paper towels can scratch the lens.

It is also possible that the dark spot is a "stuck pixel" on the image sensor inside the camera. There is no way to repair a stuck pixel outside of replacing the sensor. Any dark spot (regardless of source) can be edited out by using image editing software. This will allow you to to make the dark spot less noticeable - or practically invisible.

If the dark spot is on the rear display only, it can also be a result of a "stuck pixel" on the display itself. This should not show up an images, but only on the display. There is little that can be done outside of replacing the entire rear screen.

There are other things that can cause these problems, but those listed above are the most common.

I hope this was Very Helpful and good luck!


Nov 20, 2009 | Canon PowerShot SD1000 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Dead pixel


Please read the WHOLE of this guide before starting. Software Method
  1. Try running pixel fixing software. Stuck pixels can often be re-energized by rapidly turning them on and off. If this fails, complete the following steps.

Pressure Method
  1. Turn off your computer's monitor.
  2. Get yourself a damp washcloth, so that you don't scratch your screen.
  3. Take a household pen, pencil, screwdriver, or some other sort of instrument with a focused, but relatively dull, point. A very good tool would be a PDA stylus.
  4. Fold the washcloth to make sure you don't accidentally puncture it and scratch the screen.
  5. Apply pressure through the folded washcloth with the instrument to exactly where the stuck pixel is. Try not to put pressure anywhere else, as this may make more stuck pixels.
  6. While applying pressure, turn on your computer and screen.
  7. Remove pressure and the stuck pixel should be gone. This works as the liquid in the liquid crystal has not spread into each little pixel. This liquid is used with the backlight on your monitor, allowing different amounts of light through, which creates the different colors.

Tapping Method
  1. Turn on the computer and LCD screen.
  2. Display a black image, which will show the stuck pixel very clearly against the background. (It is very important that you are showing a black image and not just a blank signal, as you need the backlighting of the LCD to be illuminating the back of the panel).
  3. Find a pen with a rounded end. A Sharpie marker with the cap on should be fine for this.
  4. Use the rounded end of the pen to gently tap where the stuck pixel is - not too hard to start with, just enough to see a quick white glow under the point of contact. If you didn't see a white glow, then you didn't tap hard enough, so use just slightly more pressure this time.
  5. Start tapping gently. Increase the pressure on the taps gradually for 5-10 taps until the pixel rights itself.
  6. Display a white image (an empty text document is good for this) to verify that you haven't accidentally caused more damage than you fixed.

Tips
  • If the pressure and tapping don't work directly on the stuck pixel, start moving outward around the stuck pixel. If you see the pixel flicker while doing this then you know where you can focus the pressure and tapping techniques rather than directly on the pixel.
  • Many people report success with this technique but these instructions won't work in every case. It may take a few attempts to make sure you are pressing exactly on the stuck pixel.
  • These instructions will fix "stuck" pixels, not "dead" ones. Dead pixels appear black while stuck pixels can be one constant color like red, blue or green.
  • An alternative, but similar technique involves gently massaging the stuck pixel with a warm damp (not wet) soft cloth.
  • Alternative technique to tapping: Using a rounded pencil eraser, push with moderate pressure into screen at stuck pixel.
  • If these instructions don't work, you can hopefully get the monitor replaced through your manufacturer. If your monitor falls under the specifications of replacement, get in contact with the manufacturer to set up replacement plans.

Warnings
  • Do not attempt to open the monitor as it will void the warranty and the manufacturer will not replace it.
  • Make sure you don't get any electrical equipment wet or it may break.
  • Some people claim that touching the screen can cause more pixels to become stuck, although this has not been proven.
  • Be prepared to suffer a complete loss; you may crack the glass when tapping or putting pressure on an LCD assembly.
**Rytech assumes no responsibility if you cause futher damage to your product whilst following this guide. If in doubt, contact authorised service personell**

Jun 20, 2008 | HP Compaq WF1907 Monitor

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