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8 X 30 eyepiece has come loose

The right-hand adjustable eyepiece barrel has come loose from the lens which screws into the binocular body. It now fits loosely over the lens. How can this barrel be reattached to the lens? The age of the binoculars and the repair cost preclude getting professional help.

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Use strong glue and then put it on!

Posted on Mar 09, 2008

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How to hold binoculars properly


1. Remove the lens covers, if they are in place.
2. Set the diopter on the right barrel eyepiece. The function of this setting is to adjust between vision differences between your eyes if you are NOT wearing corrective lenses. Set to zero if you do have corrective lenses on (glasses or contacts). For proper diopter adjustment see this article: Binocular Selection Guide.
3. Most binoculars will hinge in the middle to allow for differences in the spacing between the eyes. Set the spacing to fit your eyes.
4. Adjust eye cups. Each eyepiece will have a means of maintaining the correct eye relief for the user. On quality binoculars the rim of the eyepiece will extend and retract as you twist the eyepiece rim. Move all the way in if you are wearing eyeglasses or adjust out if not wearing eyeglasses. You will know if they are set correctly when you look through the binoculars and check to be sure that the circular edge of the view should be sharp and not fuzzy. At this point we are not looking at any object in the view but rather the perimeter of the view. You may need to adjust the eye cups again to compensate. On lower cost binoculars the eyecup may only be a rubber lip that you either fold over (the "in" position) or out.
5 Raise binoculars to your eyes and use one finger to adjust the focus wheel on the center shaft between the two barrels, until the view is in sharp focus. If viewing for extended periods you may want to keep your elbows down near your side as this will increase comfort while viewing.
Final safety tip: Do not look at the sun through binoculars.

Many people enjoy observing nature with binoculars. Having them handy is key. Hunting, astronomy, marine use, and stadium sports are a few more activities where having a pair of binoculars can make a real impact to your experience.

Mar 06, 2014 | Zeiss Binoculars & Monoculars

2 Answers

I bought the 10x25 camera binoculars and only one lens will focus using the center dial. Its almost like the other one needs to be focused at the eye piece itself. The pictures are not clear and are...


It is common for binoculars to have one independently focusable eyepiece.  If one eyepiece can be rotated, then that is the case.
If that is the case, focus through the one that DOES NOT rotate using the center control until you get a sharp image on that side.  Then rotate the eyepiece on the blurry side until the blurry side is sharp.  If you succeed at this, from henceforth the center control will focus both eyes adequately

Aug 11, 2010 | Sharper Image Binoculars & Monoculars

1 Answer

The diopter setting eyepiece has come out of the body of my Bushnell 10X42 ''Waterproof'' binoculars, model 13-2410. I see keyways inside, but cannot screw it back in more than about 1/4 turn, which is...


The entire diopter setting eyepiece was off.I separated the eye cup from the rest of the diopter setting eyepiece, and aligned the channel guides on the lens piece to slide it into place. Then holding it in place, taking care not to gum up the lens, I experimented with how to screw in the retainer ring so that its white dot registered correctly. Finally reattach the eye cup and focus. It's like new!

Apr 10, 2010 | Bushnell Waterproof Binoculars

1 Answer

I see 2 planes of vision on my 8x24 weaver binocular


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Sep 28, 2009 | Weaver 849433 (8x24) Binocular

1 Answer

Double vision in minolta binoculars


Hi,

This is more common than you would think.. Here's how to set up a pair of binoculars to suit yourself.
Any good binocular will be able to do this and the reason is to allow you to adjust them for the difference in strenght between your two eyes. I wear glasses myself and sometimes contact lenses so it's good to be able to quickly adjust them.

1. turn the binoculars over so you are looking at the underside.
2. on the eyepieces can you see on one eye(usually the right eye) a little plus - minus marking. The eyepiece should be able to rotate a little to each side of this marking.
3. Set the rotating eyepiece to the middle setting.
4. Look through the binoculars as normal and bring the two sides together until you form the two circles that you see into one.
5. Pick an object app 10 meters away.
6 Presuming that the adjustable eyepiece is on the right hand side then close your right eye, look at the middle distance object you chose with your left eye and use the central focusing knob/wheel in the middle to bring your left eyepiece into focus.
7. Now, close your left eye and adjust the rotating right hand eyepiece while looking at the same object until your right eyepiece is in focus.
8. The binoculars should now be set for the differences in strenght of your eyes and you can use the middle focus control as normal.

Most binoculars have a soft rubber eyepiece that can be folded back for people who wear glasses but I, like most people I know who wear glasses, find it horribly uncomfortable.

This method allows you to set them for yourself and if someone else uses your binoculars you can quickly reset them for you.

Hope this helps...


- Oh yeah, sorry, forgot to mention.. This set up is so you can use them without wearing your glasses.. Much more comfortable!!

Aug 30, 2009 | Minolta Activa Standard Zoom Binocular

2 Answers

How to focus my Zeiss 10x40B TP binoculars


Your binoculars are known as the Zeiss Classic or what was once known as the Dialyt. They focus differently from the usual binoculars like those mentioned. The rear wheel is to focus both binocular barrels while using them. The front focus wheel is adjust the right eyepiece to suit your right eye. Binocular manufacturers take into account each eye is slightly different. To focus the Dialyt...First close your right eye and turn the rear wheel until the image is sharp in the left barrel. Leave the focus wheel alone. Now close left eye and adjust the front wheel until the image is sharp for your right eye. The image should now be clear and in focus for both eyes. It should not be needed to use the front wheel from now on. The rear wheel is what you will use to change the focus from near to far objects.

May 31, 2009 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

1 Answer

Mis-alignement between eyepieces


Up close to the eyepieces around the barrels are small screws that you can use to "collaminate" your binocs. The screws aren't meant to be accessed by the owner and most manufacturers cover them up with the material that surrounds the binocs. Of course the binocs in their current state are useless anyhow, so I wouldn't hesitate to peel up the material to look for the screws. If you do it carefully, you can reseat the material anyhow. Then once you locate the small screws, put the binocs on a stand or a table outside. Focus on something far away using one eye. Then using both eyes, you adjust the screw on the other eyepiece while looking through the binocs. Adjust until you get a single image. You can use loctite, or nail polish to "glue" the screw in the final position if it is really loose.

May 07, 2009 | Nikon Action Zoom XL (10-22x50) Binocular

1 Answer

I am suddenly seeing double images theough my binoculars.


Up close to the eyepieces around the barrels are small screws that you can use to "collaminate" your binocs. The screws aren't meant to be accessed by the owner and most manufacturers cover them up with the material that surrounds the binocs. Of course the binocs in their current state are useless anyhow, so I wouldn't hesitate to peel up the material to look for the screws. If you do it carefully, you can reseat the material anyhow. Then once you locate the small screws, put the binocs on a stand or a table outside. Focus on something far away using one eye. Then using both eyes, you adjust the screw on the other eyepiece while looking through the binocs. Adjust until you get a single image. You can use loctite, or nail polish to "glue" the screw in the final position if it is really loose.

Apr 25, 2009 | Eagle Optics Energy (8x21) Binocular

1 Answer

I see double one over the other about 20 degrees


Up close to the eyepieces around the barrels are small screws that you can use to "collaminate" your binocs. The screws aren't meant to be accessed by the owner and most manufacturers cover them up with the material that surrounds the binocs. Of course the binocs in their current state are useless anyhow, so I wouldn't hesitate to peel up the material to look for the screws. If you do it carefully, you can reseat the material anyhow. Then once you locate the small screws, put the binocs on a stand or a table outside. Focus on something far away using one eye. Then using both eyes, you adjust the screw on the other eyepiece while looking through the binocs. Adjust until you get a single image. You can use loctite, or nail polish to "glue" the screw in the final position if it is really loose.

Apr 23, 2009 | Steiner Tasco Offshore 54 Binoculars

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