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Amana HTM (heat transfer module) system

Model Z8WC8612N-0A Air Handler. Change over valve messing up. Heating water, but not calling for heat

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I would check the house thermostat(and its wiring to the indoor unit), and if it's OK then check the heat transfer fluid diverter valve inside the indoor unit (should be sending the hot fluid through the big radiator (air exchanger)) until the surface temperature of the radiator is approximately 130 degrees F, then the fan control operates and the fan starts to blow hot air through your ductwork. My HTM is 26 years old and I've had many opportunities to "hone" its operation...

Posted on Sep 24, 2008

  • enb54 Apr 13, 2010

    Just helped a friend replace the 3 way diverter valve on his old Amana HTM Plus, we used a Honeywell V8044A1044, worked like a charm!

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Hi Jamiebob
I have an Amana HTM heat transfer fluid diverter valve with the switch inside.
I removed the bad leaking water heater from the system and this valve.
The valve is original as installed new in 1987, but was still working when removed.
It is yours for the taking if you want it.
You can contact me at email w.courtney@sbcglobal.net

Posted on Jan 18, 2009

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The diverter valve has a switch that closes when motor that moves the valve reaches its limit. The water heat thermostat is conected to this motor and the switch calls for heat. It is this switch that is bad.

Posted on Dec 29, 2008

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Check water pump motor.may be its not working.

Posted on Mar 17, 2008

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How do I fix central heating


The first thing you need to substantiate is the fact that there is enough water in the system. It will be a closed loop system requiring approximately 10 psi/ floor. (Only a rule of thumb). Usually when one protion of the system works and the other does not, it is an issue of water quantity available to circulate through the combination of loops. If you have to add water, you will probably have to purge air from the highest points in the system. Even if there is an "Airtrol" fitted in the bottom of the expansion tank, bleeding the high points will eliminate air quicker.

The hot water portion of the loop should only be going through a heat exchanger that transfers the loop temp to the domestic water circuit and the three way valve is probably a 'mixing valve' utilized to maintain a certain loop temperature on the primary loop.

Dec 01, 2014 | Honeywell Heating & Cooling

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Thermostat wiring terminals and colors


R - The R terminal is the power for the thermostat. This comes from the transformer usually located in the blower section for split systems but you may find the transformer in the condensing unit. For this reason, it is a good idea to kill the power at the condensing unit and the blower section before changing or working on the wiring at the thermostat. If you have a package unit then the transformer is in the package unit.
Red for the R terminal.

RC - The RC terminal is designated for the power for cooling. Some HVAC systems use two transformers. A transformer for cooling and a transformer for heating. In this case the power from the transformer in the blower section would go to the thermostat terminal. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.
Red for RC terminal.

RH - The RH terminal is designated for the power for heating. See RC above for an explanation. It should be noted that a jumper can be installed between RC and RH for a heating and cooling system equipped with a single transformer.

Y - This is the terminal for cooling or air conditioning and goes to the compressor relay. Typically a thermostat wire pull is made to the air handler on split systems and then this wire is spliced for the separate wire pull which is made to the condenser. Some manufacturers put a terminal board strip near the control board in the air handler so a splice is not needed.
Yellow for Y Terminal.

Y2 - This is the thermostat terminal for cooling second stage if your system is so equipped. Many systems only have a single compressor but if you have two compressors which should only operate off of one thermostat then you need the Y2 thermostat terminal for second stage cooling.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is light blue but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use. Most installers use the color coding as noted but be aware that some do not use the thermostat color coding.

W - This is the thermostat terminal for heating. This wire should go directly to the heating source whether it be a gas or oil furnace, electric furnace, or boiler,
White for W Terminal.

W2 - This is the thermostat terminal used for second stage heat. There are gas furnaces with low fire and high fire and some depend on control from a two-stage heating thermostat with a W2 terminal. Heat Pumps use staging for auxiliary heat and need a W2 terminal.
*The most common color I've seen used for this terminal and wire designation is brown but this varies and is completely up to the installer what color to use.

G - This is the thermostat terminal used for the fan relay to energize the indoor blower fan. On a split system the blower fan is in the blower section while with a package unit the blower fan is in the outdoor package unit.

Green for G Terminal.

C - This is the thermostat terminal which originates from the transformer and is necessary to complete the 24 volts power circuit in the thermostat but only if the thermostat consumes electricity for power. Many digital thermostats require 24 volts for power so the common wire is necessary.
C stands for common and there is no universal color used for this terminal although black is the most common color I've seen.

O or B - These thermostat terminals are for heat pumps and the B thermostat terminal is used on for Rheem or Ruud and any manufacturer that energizes the reversing valve in heating mode for the heat pump. Most other manufacturers of heat pumps will utilize the reversing valve for cooling and the O thermostat terminal will be utilized for this purpose. This wire goes to outside heat pump condenser where the reversing valve is located.

Orange for O and Dark Blue for B depending on the installer of the heat pump and the manufacturer. If you have a Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Lennox, Ducane, Heil, Fedders, Amana, Janitrol, or any other manufacturer other than Rheem or Ruud you will be utilizing the orange wire for reversing valve. Rheem and Ruud will usually utilize the blue wire for reversing valve.

E - This thermostat terminal is for heat pumps and stands for Emergency Heating. If for whatever reason the heat pump condenser fails and it is necessary to run the heat there is an option on heat pump thermostats for emergency heating. Basically this simply utilizes the back-up heat source many heat pumps have to heat the home without sending a signal to the condenser to run for heat.

E - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the E terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

X or Aux - This thermostat terminal is for back-up on a heat pump and allows for auxiliary heating from the back-up heat source usually located in the air handler.

X or Aux - There is no universal color used for this thermostat terminal designation but this should be wired directly to the heating relay or the Aux terminal on a terminal strip board in the air handler or package unit if you have a heat pump package unit.

S1 & S2 or Outdoor 1 and Outdoor 2 - Some thermostats have this terminal and it used for an outdoor temperature sensor. The wire uses for this should be special shielded wire and completely separate form the other thermostat wires.







on Jun 06, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Hey, I purchased your Honeywell RTH2510 Thermostat, but I didn't even think to label the wires when I took the old thermostat off. Upon installation of the new Thermostat (2510) the Air Conditioning...


The connections that you really need to reference would be at the air handler itself. That would tell you which wires go outside to the heat pump and which wires go to the air handler. I can however give you some basics that may help.

Heat Pump Wiring
Terminals/Colors/Function
R- Red- 24v power supply. (Usually a jumper between RC/RH)
G- Green- Fan
W- White- Heat (Sometimes W1-W2, first or second stage heat)
Y- Yellow- Cooling (Same applies as above i.e. Y1-Y2)
C- Common (Most people use blue unless it is used for B terminal and sometimes cooling on older 4 wire systems.
B/O- Reversing Valve for heat pump. Either powered heating or powered cooling, depending on system installed.
Aux- Also used for heat.

Note: Considering that the installer had their own way to run all wires, use different wires, connections, etc. This is just a reference to common wiring in the field.

How the most common system is hooked up:
Thermostat:
Red wire goes to R terminal
Yellow wire goes to Y1 or Y2 terminal
Green wire goes to G terminal
White wire usually goes to W1 or W2 terminal
Orange or Black wire goes to B/O terminal
Brown wire usually goes to Aux terminal
Blue wire goes to C terminal, unless its being used as stated above.

This is without using a fossil fuel kit or zone control board.

Where do they go from the thermostat?
Red
goes to the air handler transformer or board and goes outside to heat pump to power low voltage controls.
Yellow wire goes straight outside to Y terminals on heat pump unless going to a board inside first.
Green goes to the air handler fan relay.
Common goes to the air handler and outside to heat pump.
Black or Orange will go outside to heat pump terminals for reversing valve.
White usually goes outside to heat pump,and inside to air handler. Will explain reason further down.
Brown will go to the air handler to the heat relay for the emergency heat.

On a call for heat, with a powered cooling system (more common).
The R, Y, and G terminals energize, sending a signal to start the blower and pull in the contactor outside. Note that the Y terminal is usually cooling, but since this is a powered cooling system, the reversing valve is not energized, causing the system to run in heat mode. If you have powered heating, the reversing valve terminal will energize also. Depending on thermostat, if you set the temp substantially higher than room temp, it may kick on the emergency/aux heat to quickly raise the room temp. On a call for emergency/aux heat, the R, G, and E/Aux terminals are energized, turning on the electric/gas heat instead of the heat pump. This comes in handy since the heat pump can only pull so much heat from outside before its not enough to properly warm the house, usually around 30 degrees outside temp. If you are running the heat pump and the system goes into "defrost", the outside unit will send a signal back to the air handler, through the white wire I mentioned earlier, to tell the emergency/aux heat to come on while it is in defrost mode, providing heat whenever needed.

Again, this is just a reference guide to some basic wiring, but hopefully it will tell you where the problem is or at the least, give you a good start. There are variables in which things can change the wiring like a zoning system or fossil fuel kit. Even then, you should be able to get pretty close. Hope this helps and Happy Holidays!

Dec 07, 2013 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Have a Amana a/c heater central furnace. Model number PGA30R0452A. The a/c part works fine. The heater part does not turn on sometimes. We have to keep turning it on and off to get to work. No matter what...


When you change from cooling to heating the fan will not come on immediately. A solenoid valve is energized (check that it is working) and operates a reverse valve, changing the gas flow in the system. It takes a few minutes for the system to build up sufficient heat and then the fan will come on. The humming sound is very likely coming from the solenoid valve. Make sure the air filters are clean. Obstruction caused by dirty air filter can prevent the air sensor from sensing the return air temperature.

Nov 18, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Can somebody help,why is my Central AC blows


Most heat pumps have an auxillary heat. Many are electric auxillary heat with a heat strip in the air handler. A common malfunction is for the electric auxillary heat to operate when the heat pump is set on cool. To confirm this, locate the conductor that runs from the heat sequencer to the connection on the heat strip. You will see this on the top section of the air handler. Use the clamp on part of the amp meter over that wire. If the thermostat is set on cool and the heat strip is drawing amps, it means the heat is coming on while the heat pump is set on cool. There is usually one or two causes for this, either the sequencer is bad or there is low voltage wires usually behind the thermostat or in the air handler closet that are touching that shouldn't be touching.

If this is not the case, if its not a problem of where the heat is coming on with the air conditioner, it could be a case of the reversing valve malfunctioning. The way a heat pump works is it reverses the flow of the refridgerant. For instance, many heat pumps the reversing valve is activated in cool. That would mean that there is a low voltage circuit that activates the reversing valve when the heat pump is in cool. I'm not sure what model/brand your heat pump is, Goodman and Janitrol for instance, the heat pump reversing valve is activated in cool. In any case, if the reversing valve is not operating properly, when the air conditioning is set to cool it will actually be heating. Or you could set it to heat and it may actually be cooling instead of heating. Please check these two items first and if you have any further questions, please let me know. Especially if you know of any additional problems like the evaporater is icing up or if the air handler fan is not operating when it should.

Aug 31, 2009 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Have an amana central air duelfuel heat system.when aux heat[gas] heats the house and shuts off the fans still blow for 3 to 5 minutes with the last couple of minutes being cold air which cools the...


Change your heating delay to shut off sooner, you can find this in the installation manual. Also the Thermostat may have delay after heat as well. It is true there could be many variables, but it also sounds like the Heatpump is not charged properly, you will have to have a different tech come out and check that. No need to have the installer mess your system up any further. This solution will only correct the auxilary heat, your heat pump on the other hand will require expert skills.

Dec 05, 2008 | Amana Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

A/C turns on and cools but Heating system does not turn on when switched fron a/c to heat. All I hear is a click form the heating system.


Depending on whether you have a gas or elec. heating system it could be a fan control module or a heat sequencer. It's not the thermostat since it is clicking calling for heat. It's not the blower motor because it comes on during cooling. Either way it's an inexpensive repair.

Oct 13, 2008 | Amana Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Wiring diagam for goodman heatpump and air handler to thermostate


On your t-stat you have Y, W1, W2, R, O, G, B or C or X. Y is your cooling circuit and will be the same in the air handler and heat pump unit, use the yellow wire for this circuit. W1 and W2 are your back up elec. or gas heat. Depending on how many kws or heat strips you have and t-stat wires you will put the white wire to W1 in both the t-stat and air handler. W2 is for your second stage back up heat if air handler calls for it, this will be a tan or brown or black t-stat wire and goes to W2 on t-stat and air handler. R is half of your 24v control power from the transformer and is the red wire and goes to the t-stat, air handler, and heat pump. O is for the reversing valve in the heat pump that switches it from heating and cooling. You guessed it the orange wire connect to t-stat and heat pump. G is for the blower and is the green wire to the t-stat and air handler. B or C or X is known as the common which is the other half of control circuit from 24v transform it is the blue wire and goes to the t-stat, air handler, and heat pump.





Oct 09, 2008 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

1997 Amana 2 or 2.5 ton heat pump, 13 seer - air handler only blows 4-5 min


do you have a totaline t-stat. they and some other brands have a fan recirculation setting in the installers menu.

this is assuming that this happens in addition to the heating or cooling normally

Jul 02, 2008 | Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air...

2 Answers

Not heating


Yes, the reversing valve has a separate coil. some energize on cool mode, some on heat mode. Has the thermostat been replaced? I find this a common mistake.

Nov 03, 2007 | Amana Comfort Zone 18M33PCEH Air...

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