Question about SanDisk Sansa e250 MP3 Player

2 Answers

Can you play WMA's on Sansa Mp3 model e250?

I recently bought some WMA songs. They play fine on my computer and I was able to download them to the player but when I try to play them it reads synchronize to continue your music subscription. As far as I could tell when I did the sync I thought the WMA's read that they were already synchronized. Is there anything I can do, or do WMA's not play on this model?

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  • Anonymous Sep 09, 2008

    i cant download music

  • angel_ang_32 Feb 26, 2009

    the press do not go anywhere and the scean sitll the same and don't move

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2 Answers

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The sansa e250 will play wma files, as per Sandisk.
The problem is you bought them from a download service so there DRM protected.
The easiest way I found to remove them is to use tunebite .
Cost is about $30 or you can find it on P2P sites or newgroups.

The down side is it takes about 14 hours to convert 5 gigs worth of music. But you can then play it on anything.

TIP: convert the files to mp3 not wma so they can be used on practically any player

@szwaan wma stands for "windows media audio"

Posted on Feb 20, 2008

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  • 209 Answers

Im guessing you mean Windows Media Application, I'm pretty sure these are not protected and you should be able to put them on your mp3 player.
Did you try converting them ?
Where did you buy these songs ?

Well, good luck.

Posted on Feb 01, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Synchronize MP3

In order to play your song you will need to try to transfer one track to that device...once you do that all the songs should acquire new licenses...you need to transfer tracks to your device once a month in order to play the songs...you should be able to play your purchased tracks....if not you might need to format the device inside WMP....then you need to check the licenses on your purchased tracks to make sure they dont have any restrictions...if you have any questions...computerrep@gmail.com

Posted on Jan 03, 2008

ThaMp3Doctor
  • 8596 Answers

SOURCE: Playing synchronized songs

Renew your Rhapsody subscription and resync

Posted on May 24, 2008

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3 Answers

Ok I bought a riptunes mp3 player for my daughter for Christmas. I read the instruction manual 3 times and nowhere does it mention how to download music from itunes or the computer anywhere. I purchased...


I Tunes is only for Ipods, they use an ACC format to play
Most other MP3 players use Windows Media Player (WMVor WMA) format or other format to play their music and videos on their players.
You can convert the I Tunes (ACC format) songs and videos to WMA/WMV or other formats by using a "Format Converter"
You can download a free format converter at: http://www.formatoz.com/
After you get the songs,videos converted, download them to Windows Media Player, plug in your MP3 player and it will be recognized by the Windows Media Player and then transfer your songs to your player.
You should be good to go.
This is a FREE answer, Please take time to rate me

Dec 26, 2010 | Audio Players & Recorders

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Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part I By Tha Mp3 Doctor I have seen...


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part I
By Tha Mp3 Doctor
I have seen quite a few threads around Fixya in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in the Mp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC, WAV, RA, etc. Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.
First things first. If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu. If you do not know how to do this, you will need to contact the manufacturer of your computer or go to www.microsoft.com. For all types of file except RA, RAX, and WMA, the “General” Tab under Properties will auto-populate. If your computer recognizes the file format, it will say something like “MPEG-3,” “Windows Media Audio” (Windows Media Player), “Real Audio” (Real Player or Real Network’s Audio), or “Advanced Audio Coding” (iTunes) or some other such designator. If your computer does not recognize the format, then you will just see a generic “Audio File,” and will have to download additional software. With WMA and some RAX files, there will also be a “License,” “Digital Rights Management,” or “Media Usage Rights” tab. I will explain these licensing tabs later, in the discussion on WMA files.
For every type of file other than WMA, the format error is pretty straightforward. You are trying to load a completely incompatible file format that is not recognized by the Mp3 player. To give you an example, there are currently no Philips GoGear Mp3 players that will load songs from the iTunes music service. The reason they will not transfer or play correctly is that the GoGear is that iTunes gives the users their songs in .AAC format. The GoGear cannot recognize .AAC format. To resolve this problem, you will have to convert the AAC song file into Mp3 format, or some other format that the GoGear recognizes (Note to the law-abiding: converting a copyright protected file into another format might be illegal. If you are concerned, I would just re-download the same song in Mp3 or another recognized file format – this will require a separate music service other than iTunes, in this example).
Please Read Part II for Critical Information...

on Jun 09, 2008 | iRiver H340 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Playback error


ok some mp3 players also read wma wich is an audio cd format wat u need to do is either convert the wma,s in to mp3s or just put nothing but mp3 formatted songs

Mar 07, 2010 | Creative Labs ZEN V Plus MP3 Player

1 Answer

When i download my songs on my GPX ML638B MP3 PLAYER SOME SONGS PLAY AND SOME DONT WHY


Some digital music files are in a DRM-protected WMA format that does not allow playback on an mp3 player, even though they will play fine on your computer. The only reliable way around this problem is to only download files that are in mp3 format.

Jan 24, 2009 | GPX ML648B MP3 Player

1 Answer

Songs won't go on mp3 player.


Song Formats for Mp3 Players Explained, Part I
By Tha Mp3 Doctor
I have seen quite a few threads around Fixya in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in the Mp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC, WAV, RA, etc. Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.
First things first. If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu. If you do not know how to do this, you will need to contact the manufacturer of your computer or go to www.microsoft.com. For all types of file except RA, RAX, and WMA, the “General” Tab under Properties will auto-populate. If your computer recognizes the file format, it will say something like “MPEG-3,” “Windows Media Audio” (Windows Media Player), “Real Audio” (Real Player or Real Network’s Audio), or “Advanced Audio Coding” (iTunes) or some other such designator. If your computer does not recognize the format, then you will just see a generic “Audio File,” and will have to download additional software. With WMA and some RAX files, there will also be a “License,” “Digital Rights Management,” or “Media Usage Rights” tab. I will explain these licensing tabs later, in the discussion on WMA files.
For every type of file other than WMA, the format error is pretty straightforward. You are trying to load a completely incompatible file format that is not recognized by the Mp3 player. To give you an example, there are currently no Philips GoGear Mp3 players that will load songs from the iTunes music service. The reason they will not transfer or play correctly is that the GoGear is that iTunes gives the users their songs in .AAC format. The GoGear cannot recognize .AAC format. To resolve this problem, you will have to convert the AAC song file into Mp3 format, or some other format that the GoGear recognizes (Note to the law-abiding: converting a copyright protected file into another format might be illegal. If you are concerned, I would just re-download the same song in Mp3 or another recognized file format – this will require a separate music service other than iTunes, in this example).
Please Read Part II for Critical Information...

Sep 20, 2008 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

MY SANSA WONT SYNC SONGS..


The songs are in the wrong format - they need to be stripped of their DRM license (illegal) or converted to mp3 format.  The best, most legal way to do this is to redownload the songs as an Mp3 file, or re-rip your CD's in Windows Media Player in Mp3 format.
these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 12, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa e260 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Device is operating slowly, reset...


Make sure the device is fully charged. Make sure the songs are in the correct format - Mp3 is best; iTunes/AAC will not work; check the bit rate of the songs to make sure they are at acceptable levels.
Also, make sure you are using the Media Manager to convert files. Formatting the player, in this case, might have been a bad idea, b/c it is possible that it erased key system files - I do not see where Sony has the original firmware/software for this particular product on their website, so it is going to be difficult to reload it if that is the case.
Here is some general info: I have seen quite a few threads in which the stated problem is that the Mp3 or Digital Audio Player will not load the songs; will appear to load the songs but will not actually play them in theMp3 player once disconnected from computer; will skip the songs on the player, or show only “0:00” for file length; songs “disappear” all of a sudden (although this particular problem can be caused for many reasons not covered in this article); your store-bought/burned/ripped CD’s will not load into your Mp3 player; or get the error message “File Format Not Supported.” 
All of these problems occur because the user is trying to download a song format that the player does not recognize. Every music file is in a certain format. The most common music file formats are Mp3, WMA, AAC (iTunes), WAV, RA, etc.  In addition, every file format type is in a certain bitrate, size, etc.  By far the most common issue is that the music file contains a license or copyright (especially with WMA or AAC file formats).  Each Mp3 player only recognizes a certain number of these formats. Every Mp3 Player is different. You will have to check your Mp3 player’s product specifications (specs) or user’s manual to find out which formats your particular Mp3 player recognizes. When you try to download or sync the wrong file format, you will get one of the errors that I mentioned above.   If you want to know what file type you have, then you must find the location of the individual music file on your computer, right click the title of the song, and select the option “Properties” from the menu.
Mp3 player product documentation is not straightforward.  If a player supports only non-protected WMA files, it will merely say that it supports WMA – it will not tell which type of WMA it supports.  A player that supports DRM-protected WMA’s will usually indicate such on the box (usually with a Windows Plays For Sure logo – which is actually an ironic misnomer).  DRM stands for Digital Rights Management, and it is a type of licensing system for WMA files.  It is used extensively by mp3 player music services such as Bearshare, LeapFrog, Napster, and others.  Not all DRM licenses are created equal – there are licenses with “play rights,” burn rights,” and “transfer rights.”  Play rights mean that you can only play the song on your PC – it will play fine on your computer, but it will not play in your mp3 player even though it appears to transfer.  Burn rights mean that the song can be burned to CD.  Transfer rights mean that the song can be transferred onto an mp3 player that supports DRM-protected files.  Then, there are unlimited licenses and limited licenses.  Limited licenses only allow you to play a song for a certain length of time. You would have to pay extra to continue using the song after that trial period is over – the time length ranges from a few days to several months or longer.

-Tha Mp3 Doctor

Sep 04, 2008 | Sony NWZ-S615F Walkman Video MP3 Player

1 Answer

Songs


The WMA songs that you have are DRM-encrypted, and they do not have "transfer rights" - as in, you cannot play them on your Mp3 player (either that, or they are only sample songs)

Solution 1: Upgrade your music service subscription
Solution 2: Convert the Songs to Mp3 format

Read up on DRM encryption - you can find more info in my 2-part "Tips & Tricks" under my profile - on song formats

Jun 20, 2008 | SanDisk Sansa c240 MP3 Player

1 Answer

Rca junk


When RCA first came out with the Lyra series the only way to get music onto the device was by using musicmatch jukebox that would convert your mp3 file to mpy before downloading it to the device. But now RCA has come out with a new firm ware update for these mp3 players that improved the players playback quality plus enabled it to use .WMA files. so first go to RCA support http://support.rcaaudiovideo.com/select.aspx?u=downloads and find your player and download the firmware upgrade and install to your player its very easy and instructions are at the same site. You can now convert your music to .wma or use the free Real player that will convert mp3 to wma at the kbps that you request before loading it on. If your music is all ready in wma format you can use windows media player to send the files to your player. One last thing the .wma files that you put on your Lyra player need to be at least 128kbps or higher enhanced playback quality of wma files (160 kbps to 256 kbps).

Jan 15, 2008 | RCA Lyra RD1080 MP3 Player

1 Answer

My MP3 player isn't playing WMA files


No offence but DUH!! its and MP3 player, not a WMA player!!

Jun 04, 2006 | Samsung Yepp YP-F1X MP3 Player

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