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Redundant hot swap psu's to EPS 12V (24-pin) ATX Power Supply

Just a simple , yet increasingly hard question to get an answer to..
can you convert redundant hot swap psu's to EPS 12V (24-pin) ATX Power Supply.. ??
can it be done??

Dave

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redundant hot swap psu's to EPS 12V (24-pin) ATX P - rpi.jpgThis is the psu
zalman.jpgthis eps 24 pin
as u can see the matter at hand can be preformed, as long as the fitting is compatable

Posted on Jan 30, 2008

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I have a dell dib75r pinevalley mainboard I need to know whats the max power supply i can apply to this motherboard pls. for graphics card


The stock 305W power supply guarantees 20 to 25W on the +5VSB rails and 150 to 170W on the 3.3v/5V Rails. Many GTX 750 TI now say (300W PSU that can supply 18 AMPS MIN on the 12v rail aka 216W on the 12v rail.

Many EPS 12v power supplies only guarantee 10 to 15W on the +5VSB and 125 to 130W on the 3.3v Rails.

This means you buy the supply and it may not even turn on. If it does it wont work with the 960 card installed.

Buying a power supply is not a single 12v rail and thats the only thing it uses.

There are many users who should have gotten a corsair RM1000 but instead chose an ATX not EPS 12v power supply at 500 to 750W and they have the Solid Amber Light of *****. EPS12v 2.92 for 750W and up guarantees 150W on the 3.3v rail, 20W on the +5vsb rail and 375W on the 12v Rails minimum.
CORSAIR RM Series RM1000 1000W ATX12V v2 4 and EPS 2 92 80 PLUS GOLD...

Jan 20, 2016 | Dell Motherboards

1 Answer

New GA-990AX-UD3 motherboard will not boot


You really should take that Power Supply, and use it on grandma's computer.

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable was brought out, to provide more power To the motherboard AND processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

The 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable has TWO yellow wires.
Yellow wires are 12 Volt wires. (And two Black ground wires)

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

The 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable has FOUR 12 Volt wires.

In the motherboard manual, does it say, "Yes Tom. Go ahead and use a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable. We don't care. We just use an 8-pin EPS for fun."

[ This is an 8-pin PCI Express power cable. Completely different,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8 ]

The motherboard probably uses 150 Watts by itself.
No Ram Memory, no CPU, no fans, etc.

The CPU could use up to 125 Watts of power. Just depends on what AMD, socket AM3, processor you are using.

Now to graphics card's power;
The most Wattage a PCI-Express x16 slot can deliver is 75 Watts.

The most power a 6-pin PCI Express power cable can deliver is 75 Watts.
8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable? 150 Watts.

When buying a Power Supply you should calculate all components needing power,

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

,then buy a Power Supply that has AT LEAST 10 percent more power than needed. Easier on the Power Supply.
Also a computer will NOT use more power than it needs.

10,000 Watt power supply, (Exaggeration ), and the computer only needs about 100 Watts for surfing the internet?

Computer ONLY uses 100 Watts.

Due to the price, the above, and the availability, you should use a 500 Watt power supply at least.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=899123&CatId=1079

http://www.amazon.com/StarTech-6in-Pin-Power-Adapter/dp/B002O21XHQ

Or use it on yours if it has enough Wattage.

Back in the day, the motherboard didn't need to supply that much power to components on it.
More powerful Processors, Ram Memory, and graphics cards, brought the power needed, up.

A 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable was added for the motherboard. Then 6-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Then the 8-pin PCI Express power cable for graphics cards. Lastly the 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable.

(Better make sure the Power Supply you have is good, if you wish to use the above power adapter cable. Nothing like having a Power Supply with a weak voltage power rail, and a new build, to pull your hair out on )

http://www.gigabyte.com/products/product-page.aspx?pid=3894#ov


Out of the motherboard manual Page 23,

"With the use of the power connector, the power supply can supply enough stable power to all the components on the motherboard. Before connecting the power connector, first make sure the power supply is turned off and all devices are properly installed. The power connector possesses a foolproof design.

Connect the power supply cable to the power connector in the correct orientation. The 12V power connector mainly supplies power to the CPU. If the 12V power connector is not connected, the computer will not start.

To meet expansion requirements, it is recommended that a power supply that can withstand high power consumption be used (500W or greater). If a power supply is used that does not provide the required power, the result can lead to an unstable or unbootable system."

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Oct 25, 2012 | Gigabyte Technology GA-990FXA-UD3-...

1 Answer

SuperMicro H8QG6-F Continous Beep


http://www.supermicro.com/Aplus/motherboard/Opteron6000/SR56x0/H8QG6-F.cfm

Under the Link and Resources heading, in the blue banner to the right, click on - Motherboard Manual

Page 32 of the PDF file. Page 2-10 for the manuals actual page,

2-7 Connector definitions:
Power Connectors

"A 24-pin main power supply connector (JWP1), and three 8-pin CPU PWR connectors (JWP2 / JWP3 /JWP4) on the motherboard.
These power connectors meet the SSI EPS 12V (Volt) specification.

In addition to the 24-pin ATX power connector, the 12V 8-pin CPU connectors at JWP2 / JWP3 / JWP4, MUST be connected to your power supply.

Warning: To prevent damage to the power supply or motherboard, please use a power supply that contains a 24-pin and three 8-pin
power connectors.

Be sure to connect these connectors to the 24-pin (JPW1) and the three 8-pin (JPW2,JPW3 and JPW4) power connectors on the motherboard.

Failure in doing so will void the manufacturer warranty on your power supply and motherboard."

So there you have it.

YES.

These,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8


NOT these,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

For additional questions please post in a Comment.

Regards,
joecoolvette

Sep 02, 2012 | Super Micro Computer SUPERMICRO H8QG6-F

1 Answer

What power supply connector will work with the ms8137c motherboard (aka, 20 + 4 pin)


Ahem, you just posted 20 + 4-pin.

That means it can be a 20-pin ATX main power cable, OR a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

Most power supply's now have a 20 + 4-pin power cable.

Use the 20-pin connector, or add the additional 4-pin connector, to make a 24-pin ATX main power cable.

Example.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20plus4

In direct answer to your question, however, it uses a 20-pin ATX main power cable.

For additional questions post in a Comment.
Regards,
joecoolvette

Jun 17, 2012 | Matsonic MS8137C Motherboard

1 Answer

This is my first build and all the connections are a bit confussing need picts of how to install cables to hardware


The following picture will definitely help you to install new power supply.
mbdguru_0.jpg
The 4 pin CPU power connector is using in most of the desktop motherboard. If your motherboard is gaming type or workstation board you need to connect 8pin CPU power connector. Molex connectors are using to power up DVD Drives and HDDs. In New model power supply instead of molex connector SATA Power connectors are coming.

Feb 12, 2011 | Thermaltake Toughpower XT TPX675M 675W ATX...

1 Answer

What type (atx or atx12v etc.) power supply is compatible with the intel h55tc mobo?


A quick look at the H55TC's architecture tells me you should choose - at minimum - a power supply
that is ATX12V 2.0 compliant. This will provide you with a contiguous 24-pin connection to the CPU,
increased power on the 12V rails, and adequate power to most of the board's optional components.

That's the short answer.

From there you need to take a look at how you intend on completing your build. Are you going to use the onboard graphics or pop in a discrete video card? If the latter, then you should be looking at
PSU's that are ATX12V v2.2 compliant, to provide adequate power to the PCIe x16 slot. But keep in mind that ATX12V v2.2 revision limits 12V rails to 20A per rail, which means if you plan on building a performance machine that begs for 60A of power, you'll be limited to power supplies with split 12V rails. Multiple 12V rails introduces load-balancing issues and other concerns, if your plan is to push this system to its limits.

Moving up to the ATX12V v2.3 form factor removes the 20A per rail restriction, allowing for high-amp
single 12V rail power supplies. This revision also ensures higher efficiency ratings (80% on avg.) which means less power consumption, and less heat build-up in your case.

The optimal choice would be an EPS12V compliant power supply, a revision made specifically with multi-core processors in mind. My pick for one of the best value EPS12V power supplies would be the CORSAIR CMPSU-750TX - currently on sale at Newegg for $109.99 (30-bucks-off.)

It delivers a true 750W of power; pumps out 60A on a single 12V rail; is both SLI & Crossfire certified; 80%+ efficient; Core i7 compatible - essentially future-proof for the life of the PSU.

Finally, here's a link to a pretty decent power supply calculator by Asus. It should give you a good idea of how much juice you're gonna need once you trick out your system.

Good luck, and I hope this was useful :)

Jan 04, 2011 | Intel H55TC Motherboard Core i3 540...

2 Answers

I've got a new Gigabyte Ga-M68Mt-D3 mobo paired with a cooler master 460 watt power supple. Cpu is Amd phenom II 3.2 ghz with 4 gig of DDR3 ram. I powered up the supply attached to my ATX power supply...


Most motherboards now have a 24-pin power supply connector. If you haven't already found a diagram showing the pinouts of the 20- and 24-pin power plugs, here's one borrowed from a handy site:

pgh_pa_guy_1.jpg

The two plugs are essentially the same, but the 24-pin version duplicates some voltages on the extra pins. The extra pins in the larger connector were meant to provide extra current paths for voltages that see heavy loads from newer processors and motherboard circuitry. Depending on how a motherboard is designed, it might work with a 20-pin plug connected (leaving pins 11, 12, 23 and 24 empty). But typically if the board has a 24-pin connector it needs the 24-pin power supply plug.

Most power supplies have a 20-pin plug with a separate 4-pin section that fastens to it for connection to a 24-pin mobo connector. It typically has one side designed to slide onto the end of the 20-pin plug, essentially turning it into the 24-pin version. This added plug does not have a retaining clamp on its side, so you can tell it from the the 4-pin CPU power plug. The wire colors are also different. For reference, here is the processor power plug, from the same website:

pgh_pa_guy_2.jpg
New motherboard specs call for the separate processor power connector for the same reason the extra pins were added to the power supply connector: to handle the high currents needed by increasingly faster CPUs.

When the motherboard has these connectors, you need to use them all to get everything working. Hope this helps. Thanks to smspowersupply.com for the diagrams, and thank you for using Fixya.

moz-screenshot-1.png

Nov 19, 2010 | Motherboards

1 Answer

Is that any specified smps to be used for mother board


Depends on the age of the motherboard.

To clarify;

When Switched-Mode Power Supply's were first made for personal computers, for the main power cable they used two of them.
This was the AT power supply.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#oldpc

The next version of the SMPS used a single main power cable, the ATX power supply.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain20

As personal computers increased in Processor power, and graphics power, it was found that more power to the motherboard was needed. The ATX main power cable was increased from 20-pin to 24-pin, to handle the extra load,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atxmain24

A lot of motherboards also receive extra power through a 4-pin ATX +12 Volt power cable,

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#atx12v4

This power cable is used for power to the Processor.

Power Supply's (SMPS) have increased in power over the years to keep up with the demand for power.
They have also increased the number, and type of power cables used.

Some now have an extra 6-pin PCI Express power cable for added power to a graphics card, or two 6-pin PCI Express power cables.

Some SMPS's have an 8-pin PCI Express power cable for added power to a graphics card.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#pciexpress8

If an SMPS has an 8-pin EPS +12 Volt power cable, it is used for added power to the motherboard, for the Processor.

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html#eps8

If your concern is how much power can your motherboard handle, know this;

A computer ONLY uses the power it needs, and NO more.

If you had a 10,000 Watt power supply, and the computer only needs 100 Watts, the computer only uses 100 Watts. (10,000 Watts is an exaggeration)

Do you know the motherboard's name, and Model Number?
State in a Comment, and I should be able to tell you what power cables it needs, and give examples of an SMPS that will work.

SMPS,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched-mode_power_supply

Nov 06, 2010 | Motherboards

2 Answers

System won't turn on but when i pushg down on one side of the power suply connectore the fan starts running but computer stioll won't turn on it used to boot up then opne day stopped


It sounds like you have a faulty connector - I would return the item under warranty. Otherwise, if it is out of warranty, you will have to source a new motherboard.

Nov 23, 2009 | ASUS COMPUTER INTL P5SD2-VM MBD MATX LGA...

1 Answer

System and Processor fans don't spin- anything else is working


Your description indicates your power supply may be faulty or there is a break somewhere in the 24 pin main ATX cable wiring.
Swap out the power supply. Make sure your PSU has a 24 pin ATX connector & (not a 20) pin & a 4 pin ATX_12v connector for the CPU.

Feb 17, 2008 | Gigabyte GA-M61P-S3 Motherboard

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