Question about Haier HDP18PA Stainless Steel Free-Standing Dishwasher

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Heating element The element is not heating up during the drying cycle, how do I tell if the element is burned out or a wire has come loose???

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  • Remove the screws on the back of the unit and take off the back two panels.
  • Facing the back, there is a thermostat toward the back-middle-right... it has a brass nut that holds it in place and two wires attached to it. (my wires were pink). Check this first: check the wiring here, and if you have a multimeter, check the continuity between the two terminals. It should be closed (conducting) when cold.
  • You should see the wires for the heating coil on the left side. If you have a multimeter, check the resistance across the left and right  terminals (the middle terminal with green wires is ground). If there is no continuity, the heater is dead. 
  • Finally, the only other cause would be the relay (hidden off in the right-rear corner of the unit) or the control panel.

Posted on Apr 17, 2008

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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1 Answer

My kenmore dishwasher doesnt heat during drying


The heating element is burned out or the heating circuit is fubar.

Sep 08, 2016 | Kenmore Dishwashers

1 Answer

Cloths are not drying in one cycle and need to extend the time of the drycycle not sure how? Model no dcd330gy1wc


Hi demetriosqat...
Sounds like you have a Clogged Vent or Heating Element problem.

If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork.
Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry.
It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry.
But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry.
To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.

Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element.
You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it.
The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork .
This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2.
These 2 terminals should have continuity.
If not replace the thermostat.
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Sep 10, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

Dryer takes a long time to dry. How long should an average cycle take?


The normal drying cycle for a normal load of clothes should be around a hour if you dryer is 220 Volts.

Chances are you have a Clogged Vent

If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
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Apr 11, 2011 | Maytag SDE4606A Electric Dryer

1 Answer

Dryer takes forever to dry clothes. now it will not dry clothing


Clogged Vent
If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
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Apr 11, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

My inglis model 43 00SQ is not heating properly. after it was moved, it now requires 3 or 4 cycles to dry a load of clothes.


There's a possibility that one leg of the 220v to the heating elements shook loose. Even a good manufacture can miss a properly tighten wire. It happens more that you realize. The other possiblity is that the rough treatment during the move could have caused a break in one of the heatiing elements. If you have voltmeter or have access to one, pull off the back panel that gives you access to the wiring, make sure the dryer is unplugged, and disconnect one of the leads to the elements. Now set your volt meter to the ohms position, kinda looks like a horeshoe, put one lead of the voltmeter to the detached wire and the other one to the wire that is still connnected. If the element is good it should show how many ohms or resistance the element has. It will show an amount, for this purpose it's unimportant, that means the element is good. If the reading is "0" that means the element is broken and neads to be replaced. Repeat with the other element.
There is another possibility that could have happened. During the move, part of the element may have come loose and is touching element somewhere in the middle. If this has happened it can be put back and your full heat will return. If it stays like that it will eventually burn out early.

Apr 09, 2011 | Dryers

1 Answer

Frigidaire FEQ1442ES Electric Dryer not producing heat. Quits running part way through cycle... Lights flashing green.. Clothes never get dry. Code E95


Clogged Vent
If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
This is a Free answer, Please rate me.

Oct 10, 2010 | Frigidaire FEQ1442ES Electric Dryer

1 Answer

My roper dryer quit heating,then it did,now it dont again,also it has a burning smell when it does.


Clogged Vent
If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
This is a Free answer, Please rate me.

Oct 10, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

It takes 3 cylcles to dry clothes


If your dryer seems to run forever, it could be because of a clogged vent or internal ductwork. Your dryer may have an automatic cycle that turns off the dryer when the clothes are dry. It does this with a special thermostat or moisture-sensing system.
Normally, this is what happens during an automatic cycle:
The thermostat tells the dryer to heat until the interior of the dryer reaches a pre-set temperature--say 135 degrees.
When the dryer reaches the pre-set temperature, the thermostat tells the timer to begin advancing. (If there's a moisture sensor, the timer advances only if the moisture content of the clothing is low enough.)
The timer advances until the interior cools, then the thermostat tells the timer to stop advancing, and tells the dryer to start heating again.
This cycle continues until the clothes are dry. But...if the vent is clogged, the dryer may never reach the proper operating temperature, so it doesn't send the signal to the timer and the dryer continues to run indefinitely, even if the clothes are completely dry. To fix the problem, clean the vent and/or internal ductwork.
Heating Element
Your dryer's heating element may be partially burned out. If it is, your dryer still heats, but at such a low temperature that it takes three or four times as long to dry the clothes. If the element is partially burned out, replace the heating element. You can check for an ohm reading but will need to refer to the service manual for proper reading. This sometimes on the tech sheet located somewhere on the dryer. Usually between 9-13 ohms.
Cycling thermostat
Although this isn't a common problem, one of the thermostats that controls the temperature in your dryer may break and cause the dryer to heat poorly. If so, you need to replace it. The thermostat is usually a small, round, black device mounted to an oblong steel plate. The plate is mounted to the internal ductwork . This thermostat usually has four wires going to it. Check the 2 terminals that are opposite each other and are the closer together of the 2. These 2 terminals should have continuity. If not replace the thermostat.
This is a free answer, Please rate me

Oct 04, 2010 | Miele T1302 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

No heat


If there is no heat during drying cycle, it is usually either the heating element, or a thermal fuse.

See the following suggestions from repairclinic:

If your dryer doesn't heat, check these:

Heating element
Thermal fuse
Wiring

Heating element Often a dryer heating element burns out, but doesn't trip the circuit breaker or blow a fuse. The heating element is simply a long coil of special wire. You can check it for continuity with an ohm meter. No continuity means the element is bad and you need to replace it--electric heating elements aren't repairable.

Thermal fuse On many dryers, there's a thermal fuse mounted to the exhaust duct inside the back cover panel. The fuse--which is about an inch long--is usually embedded in black resin and mounted in a white plastic housing. If the fuse has blown, you need to replace it. (You can't re-set it.)

Wiring A common problem is for the main wiring connection from the house, at the dryer, to burn and break its connection. Because the dryer can still tumble with partial power, the connection may be only partially defective. You may need to replace both the power cord to the dryer and the terminal block inside the dryer that the wire is attached to.

Oct 19, 2008 | Splendide 2000S Vented Washer/Dryer

1 Answer

Indesit DI620UK Dishwasher fault


If the dry cycle has a problem, check these:

Heating element
Drying fan
Thermostat
Heating element Your dishwasher has an electrical heating element that helps to dry the dishes. If the element is burned out, the dishes won't dry properly, and you need to replace the element.

Drying fan Many high-priced dishwashers have a small fan that blows air or heated air into the dishwasher to speed up the drying process. If the fan is defective, you need to replace it.

Thermostat Some dishwashers have a thermostat that monitors the drying temperature. If the thermostat is defective, the heating element may not cycle on or off properly. If that's the problem, you need to replace the thermostat

Jul 19, 2008 | Dishwashers

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