Question about Rolex Daytona 116520 Wrist Watch

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Watch gains time (at least 5 minutes per day); also Chronometer registers don't work

Need advice on how to avoid time gain.
Also need help determining if the chronometer registers are broken or if i am using them incorrectly.

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Re: Watch gains time (at least 5 minutes per day); also...

Nice watch!

Really worth it to bring it in to GOOD watch tech center (or mail it to Rolex in NYC) - expect to spend 'bout $200 for a cleaning and adjustment. This needs to be done every 5 years or so - the price of owning a fine mechanical watch.

Drop into any Rolex retailer for help with using the buttons.....

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 27, 2008

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Rolex Sumariner with Date submersible to 300metres

your submariner is an automatic movement that needs to be serviced every 3-5 years to replenish the oils and to stop any wear or tear on the movement the regulation is part of the service

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Nowhere in the little operations manual that came with my watch does it give the accuracy of the timepiece. Where can I get that information? I have a movado ESQ bracer chronograph.

Interesting question. I know little about watches but, as you would know, your watch does have a quartz movement, so, from Wikipedia, 'Quartz clock':

Standard-quality resonators of this type are warranted to have a long-term accuracy of about 6 parts per million at 31 degrees C (87.8 F): that is, a typical quartz wristwatch will gain or lose 15 seconds per 30 days (within a normal temperature range of 5 deg C / 41 F to 35 deg C / 95 F) or less than a half second clock drift per day when worn near the body.

If a quartz wristwatch is "rated" by measuring its timekeeping characteristics against an atomic clock's time broadcast, to determine how much time the watch gains or loses per day, and adjustments are made to the circuitry to "regulate" the timekeeping, then the corrected time will easily be accurate within 10 seconds per year. This is more than adequate to perform celestial navigation.

Assuming that you have a computer with internet-synced time and good internet, meaning around 1/100 second accuracy, why not compare the watch to the computer over the space of a week?

Sep 04, 2012 | Movado ESQ by Movado BRACER stainless...

1 Answer

Dear Sirs! My new (1month) Longines automatic watch hastens each day (and night) four seconds.Model L4.721.2 Is it normal or I have to turn to the laboratoty to fix the problem?! Thanks a lot Iosif

An automatic watch that gains 4 seconds in a day is good.A new Rolex is rated at 5 seconds per day so 4 seconds is well within what you can expect for your watch.As a tip when the watch is off the wrist place on its side,gravity slows the operation of the watch just a fraction.This is called positional error and may help.

Aug 19, 2010 | Longines New La Grande Classique Presence...

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Need a user manual for the time magazine free chronograph watch

I have NO ideal what kind of watch it is so I am giving general chronograph instructions. You will have to use as it applies to the watch you were given.

These instructions are provided for users who are not familiar with using a mechanical/analog chronograph. The instructions may be applied to any chronograph that has a seconds counter, 30 minute counter, and hour counter.
Please refer to the instructions of the appropriate model to determine the location of each counter on the dial. Note: some of the features described here may not be available on your particular model. Again, refer to the specifications to see if they apply to your model.
Using the chronographe functions:
How to read the chronographe:
For a chronographe that has a center seconds register, a 30 minute register and an hour register. Example 1: If the hour register is between the 1 and 2, but closer to the 1, and the minute register is at 20, and the seconds register is at 35, then the elapsed time is 1 hour 20 minutes and 35 seconds. Example 2: If the hour register is between the 1 and 2, but closer to the 2, and the minute register is at 20, and the seconds register is at 35, then the elapsed time is 1 hour 50 minutes and 35 seconds.
How to read the tachymetre:
If you are driving and want to determine the speed of the car using your tachymetre, start your chronograph when you pass a mile marker, stop your chronographe when you pass the next mile marker. Look at the center seconds hand and read the number on the Tachymetre scale, this number will indicate the miles per hour that the vehicle is travelling.
How to read the pulsometer:
Some watches have a pulsometer instead of a tachymetre. Use it as follows: Start the chronographe and begin counting the pulse. When you have counted 30 beats, stop the chronographe. The number on the pulsometer scale will indicate the pulse rate per minute.
How to read the telemeter:
Some watches have a telemeter instead of a tachymetre or pulsometer. Here is an example of one use for a telemeter: Start the chronographe when you see lighting. Stop the chronographe when you hear the thunder. Read the center seconds hand on the Telemetric scale and the number will indicate the distance separating the observer from the place where the lighting struck. This can give you a good indication of how far off a storm might be.
The many uses of a chronographe:
A chronograph has many practical uses, from timing a plane flight, a car ride, or simply being curious. There are also some uses for the chronographe that may not be so obvious. For example, you can use the chronographe on your watch as a dual timezone indicator. This is done as follows: If it is currently 6 A.M. in your home location and it is 12 noon in London, start your chronograph at exactly 6 o'clock. The number of hours displayed on your chronographe hour register will then show you the current time in London. Of course, these are just some uses of a chronographe. There are hundreds of uses for chronographes.

Instructions: Astronic Chronograph Chronograph Chronometer Power Reserve Chronometer Astronic Chronometer World Time Chronometer Retro Alarm General Chronograph Common Q & A's

Aug 12, 2010 | Watches

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Chronometer won't start

Not sure this is worded right. A chronometer is watch that has been certified by a Swiss organization to keep time within a set +/- seconds per day in several positions and temperatures.

A chronograph on the other hand is a watch that has push buttons on the side for starting/stopping/resetting a set of hands to mark time elapsed.

If this is truly about a chronometer not starting it is either a broken part or needs cleaning.

If it is about the chronometer not starting most likely if it is a mechanical watch the pusher is stuck or broken or a lever is out of place or bent. If the whole watch does not run then it could be a broken mainspring.

If it is a quartz chronometer it could be a bad battery or if the battery has been changed it is most likely the person that changed the battery has damaged one of the coils and or circuit.

A qualified watchmaker can help with any of these problems.

Hope this helps,
Ken Kotoski
Yellowstone Watch Inc.

Nov 28, 2009 | Breitling Watches

3 Answers

Omega Seamaster gaining about 10 minutes per hour

Hi honestfunguy. Take it back! Omega watches are usually guaranteed for 2 years or even 3 years (Co-axial escapement), so you should not have a problem getting it repaired under warrantee. No way should it be be gaining (or losing) 10 minutes per day, let alone 10 minutes per hour. Could be any number of things, from a broken mainspring to problems with the timing regulator, but they are very complex watches and should not be looked at by anyone apart from Omega whilst in warrantee, otherwise you'll probably void the warrantee. Hope this helps; Eagle58

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15 to 20 minutes fast per day

if your caliber is automatic 7s26b something is wrong with the hair spring try a seiko service center anyway isnt something that you can fix by yourself!beware!far away from jewelers and local battery changers and other monkey magicians!automatic watch calibers are delicate and they ruine them!

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I have an Oris BC3 which was never a great time keeper; gaining or losing 5-10 seconds per day. Recently, it started to gain at an alarming rate and I took it to be cleaned and regulated at a watch...

Take your watch back to the watchmaker and ask to regulate the watch again. After a decent repair watch shouldn't loose or gain that much and if properly regulated and tested can keep good time. ORIS is using the same Swiss made ETA movements as Tag Heuer, Ebel, Montblanc, Tissot, Maurice Lacroix etc. These are very good mechanical movements and can be adjusted to allmost perfect timekeeping.

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1 Answer

Watch accuracy

it is ok for a new watch to gain or lose more seconds. it takes time for the movement to settle down.

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