Question about Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

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  • leigh0403 Jan 26, 2008

    thanks soooooo much



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Yes, on this camera you leave the aperture ring at f22 and use the camera's controls to set your f-stop. It won't work is you change the ring on the lens. You gain the control of the aperture in the 'M' and 'A' modes. The 'P' setting is for the camera to pick both speed and aperture for you. 'S' is shutter priority, etc

Posted on Jan 26, 2008

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In traditional mechanical camers, you can use whatever film speed(ISO/ASA),shutter speed and Aperture.

In automatic or semi automatic's, you probably left with a choice of shutter speed or aperture priortiy in a giver film speed.

Your camera falls into the second category.

Wish you doing good with your photo course.


Posted on Jan 26, 2008


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Where is apulture,iso,shutter speed options present in camera

This is one of the biggest drawbacks of a point&shoot camera. You're expected to point the camera and shoot the picture without worrying about minor details like aperture and shutter speed.
You can select the ISO by pressing the FUNC/SET button in the shooting mode and then selecting ISO (third item from the top along the left edge of the screen).
You can control the aperture and shutter speed somewhat by changing the scene mode. For example, the portrait mode will try to give you a wide aperture, the landscape mode will try to give you a small aperture, and the sports mode will try to give you a fast shutter speed.
If you want to take your photography above and beyond the point&shoot level then you need a more capable camera.

May 10, 2012 | Canon PowerShot A420 Digital Camera

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How do I change the aperture on my N6006? And what do I change it to? I keep getting a fE E error message.

That depends on the exposure mode.

In any of the P modes, turn the aperture ring on the lens to its smallest aperture (largest aperture) and lock it. You control the exposure by turning the command dial on the camera.

In S mode, lock the aperture ring as above. Turning the command dial changes the shutter speed and the aperture changes to match.

In A mode, control the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens and the shutter speed with change to match.

In M mode, control the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens and control the shutter speed by turning the command dial.

If the lens doesn't have an aperture ring, you can only use the P and S modes.

Nov 14, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Changing shutter speed for 35mm Canon E0S Rebel camera

You should download a manual.

Specs say it is an autofocus and autoexposure camera with limited manual input required.

Sep 11, 2017 | Canon Photography

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New To This

To manually set the shutter speed and aperture, first set the top command dial to "M". Press the +/- button. Now you'll see yellow arrows beside the speed & aperture. Press the up/down on the navigation dial to change shutter speed & the left/right to change aperture. Scale at bottom will show whether and how much you are over or underexposing.

Feb 03, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S2000hd Digital Camera

1 Answer

F65 shutter speed question

The lens must be set to F/22 on that model so the camer can set the aperture. Setting it to 22 tells the camera it is ready, so the camera can actually set the proper f/stop according to the light level. You can set the aperture yourself using the control knobs on the camera - in manual settings. In Aperture, or Shutter settings, you can set the aperture or shutter speed and the camera will set the right exposure. On Program, the camera sets both aperture and shutter.

Sep 13, 2008 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

You answer to my resent problem on night shots...

Hey matty reps,
Aperture priority is a setting on most SLR cameras where you choose the aperture, which is the size of the opening in the lens that lets light thru, and the camera chooses a shutter speed that provides a correct exposure. The smaller the opening in the lens the less light that gets thru to expose the film so the shutter has to stay open longer to provide a correct exposure, but the smaller the aperture you use the larger the depth of field. Depth of field is how far in front and behind the subject things are in sharp focus. Canon refers to aperture priority as Av mode. With flash photography the camera usually sets the shutter speed to a designated speed called xsync speed, which is probably 1/90th of a second since this is what you said the camera was setting it to, but that speed is irrelevant since the duration of the flash is what determines the exposure time with flash photography which is usually around 1/10000 of a second (easily fast enough to stop almost any action). In aperture priority with a flash the smaller the aperture you use the more that will be in focus but more light will be needed from the flash and the closer you will need to be to your subject. A hotshoe mounted flash will help tremendously. I hope I didn't confuse you more, but as I said before you are attempting something difficult to do in photography. Keep trying and you'll get it!

Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 29, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Night shots

Hey matty reps,
You are attempting one of the most challenging types of photography there is, because you are combing nighttime photography and action photography. If you want to stop the action you normally would be using the highest shutter speed possible, but since you are trying to take nighttime action photographs I would rely on a flash since the flash duration in essence becomes your shutter speed. I would definitely use a hotshoe mounted flash because the built in flash will most likely not be powerful enough for your needs. I would have the camera set to aperture priority so I could control the depth of field, because the smaller the aperture the larger depth of field you will have and the less likely your subject will be out of focus. If you are attempting natural light nighttime action photography you will definitely need a very fast film speed such as 3200 speed film which will provide significant loss of image quality. You will also need a very fast lens meaning a lens with an aperture of at least f2.8 or larger, and your camera in this scenario should be set to shutter priority so you can set the camera to the fastest shutter speed possible but this will present focusing issues. In both scenarios I would have the AF system set to continuous so the camera doesn't require you to achieve focus to be able to trip the shutter. As in all challenging photography situations more photos are better than less, because you should have more failed photos than successful. I hope this helps!

Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 28, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

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Aperture priority, shutter priority

You might try overriding the white balance by setting it for fluorescent. Those bulbs are the usual cause of the green hue

Feb 12, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

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Manual Exposure mode Nikon F80

1) turn the mode switch/knob on the left of the camera to M ( manual mode ) 2) turn your lens to the highest f-stop ( 22 or 16 depending on your lens ) 3) in front of shutter release button you have control for your aperture : turn until the desired aperture is displayed ( view finder or the LCD monitor on the top ) 4) your shutter speed setting is controlled with your thumb with the control situated next to the strap lug on the right hand side of the camera. 5) press shutter release half way and look through viewfinder and see light meter reading and adjust either shutter speeds or the aperture as explained being guided by the l.meter.

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