Question about Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers


Posted by on

2 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points


    An expert that got 10 achievements.


    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 667 Answers

Yes, on this camera you leave the aperture ring at f22 and use the camera's controls to set your f-stop. It won't work is you change the ring on the lens. You gain the control of the aperture in the 'M' and 'A' modes. The 'P' setting is for the camera to pick both speed and aperture for you. 'S' is shutter priority, etc

Posted on Jan 26, 2008

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.


    An expert who has answered 20 questions.


    An expert that has over 10 points.


    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 36 Answers


In traditional mechanical camers, you can use whatever film speed(ISO/ASA),shutter speed and Aperture.

In automatic or semi automatic's, you probably left with a choice of shutter speed or aperture priortiy in a giver film speed.

Your camera falls into the second category.

Wish you doing good with your photo course.


Posted on Jan 26, 2008

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

I just bought the minolta XG-A, will I be able to adjust manually the shutter speed? I just bought it only, still has not been shipped. I bought it mainly for a film photography class but I just read that...

Minolta XG-A can work in full manual mode. The lowest shutter speed is 1 second and it had Bulb mode where the shutter is open as long as you press the button.

Sep 12, 2013 | Minolta XG-A 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I'm doing a project for school and i need to change the aperture for different photos. But my camera refuses to take the photo on any other aperture. Why is there an aperture adjuster if you can't use it....

It depends on the lens.

If you're using a lens with an aperture ring, simply set the exposure mode to Manual or Aperture priority and change the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens. In Aperture priority the camera will set the shutter speed appropriately, in Manual you have to determine the appropriate shutter speed. If you want to use such a lens in Shutter priority or one of the Program modes, you must set the aperture to its smallest setting (largest f/number) and lock it.

If you're using a lens without an aperture ring then it's a bit harder. You can only use the camera in Shutter priority or one of the Program modes. You turn the command dial on the camera to change the exposure, and the aperture will change. If you want to use an exposure different than what the meter suggests, you can adjust it by using either exposure compensation or changing the ISO setting (or both).

If you need a manual, you can download one from

Mar 08, 2011 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How do I change the aperture on my N6006? And what do I change it to? I keep getting a fE E error message.

That depends on the exposure mode.

In any of the P modes, turn the aperture ring on the lens to its smallest aperture (largest aperture) and lock it. You control the exposure by turning the command dial on the camera.

In S mode, lock the aperture ring as above. Turning the command dial changes the shutter speed and the aperture changes to match.

In A mode, control the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens and the shutter speed with change to match.

In M mode, control the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens and control the shutter speed by turning the command dial.

If the lens doesn't have an aperture ring, you can only use the P and S modes.

Nov 14, 2010 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Aperture setting and shutter speed together?

Yes it does. Check your manual. If you don't have a manual you can get a pdf download from canon. This link should get you there.

Sep 01, 2009 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

F stop settings not responding

Try it on bulb, and open the f and check it is working properly the problem might be the computer inside the camera and there's no replacement spare parts, but yoou canfind another ody and swap the computer.

Oct 01, 2008 | Minolta Maxxum 7000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

F65 shutter speed question

The lens must be set to F/22 on that model so the camer can set the aperture. Setting it to 22 tells the camera it is ready, so the camera can actually set the proper f/stop according to the light level. You can set the aperture yourself using the control knobs on the camera - in manual settings. In Aperture, or Shutter settings, you can set the aperture or shutter speed and the camera will set the right exposure. On Program, the camera sets both aperture and shutter.

Sep 13, 2008 | Nikon F65 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

You answer to my resent problem on night shots...

Hey matty reps,
Aperture priority is a setting on most SLR cameras where you choose the aperture, which is the size of the opening in the lens that lets light thru, and the camera chooses a shutter speed that provides a correct exposure. The smaller the opening in the lens the less light that gets thru to expose the film so the shutter has to stay open longer to provide a correct exposure, but the smaller the aperture you use the larger the depth of field. Depth of field is how far in front and behind the subject things are in sharp focus. Canon refers to aperture priority as Av mode. With flash photography the camera usually sets the shutter speed to a designated speed called xsync speed, which is probably 1/90th of a second since this is what you said the camera was setting it to, but that speed is irrelevant since the duration of the flash is what determines the exposure time with flash photography which is usually around 1/10000 of a second (easily fast enough to stop almost any action). In aperture priority with a flash the smaller the aperture you use the more that will be in focus but more light will be needed from the flash and the closer you will need to be to your subject. A hotshoe mounted flash will help tremendously. I hope I didn't confuse you more, but as I said before you are attempting something difficult to do in photography. Keep trying and you'll get it!

Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 29, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Night shots

Hey matty reps,
You are attempting one of the most challenging types of photography there is, because you are combing nighttime photography and action photography. If you want to stop the action you normally would be using the highest shutter speed possible, but since you are trying to take nighttime action photographs I would rely on a flash since the flash duration in essence becomes your shutter speed. I would definitely use a hotshoe mounted flash because the built in flash will most likely not be powerful enough for your needs. I would have the camera set to aperture priority so I could control the depth of field, because the smaller the aperture the larger depth of field you will have and the less likely your subject will be out of focus. If you are attempting natural light nighttime action photography you will definitely need a very fast film speed such as 3200 speed film which will provide significant loss of image quality. You will also need a very fast lens meaning a lens with an aperture of at least f2.8 or larger, and your camera in this scenario should be set to shutter priority so you can set the camera to the fastest shutter speed possible but this will present focusing issues. In both scenarios I would have the AF system set to continuous so the camera doesn't require you to achieve focus to be able to trip the shutter. As in all challenging photography situations more photos are better than less, because you should have more failed photos than successful. I hope this helps!

Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 28, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel K2 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

How and when to use the flash

When you take a shot slower than 1/20, the shutter takes longer to close. This means while it is open, it will record everything. The best way to correct this is not the flash really. Try putting it on a tripod. This way you can lower your shutter speed without sacrificing crisp pictures. Also, with a built in flash, you get a very shallow lit area. If your subject is far from the camera, the flash won't do much good. When this happens, the only thing to do is get a stronger mounted flash or slow your shutter down and open up your aperture. Hope this helps. Keep me posted. Photography is a never ending learning process.

Oct 15, 2007 | Canon EOS Rebel Ti / 300V 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Manual Exposure mode Nikon F80

1) turn the mode switch/knob on the left of the camera to M ( manual mode ) 2) turn your lens to the highest f-stop ( 22 or 16 depending on your lens ) 3) in front of shutter release button you have control for your aperture : turn until the desired aperture is displayed ( view finder or the LCD monitor on the top ) 4) your shutter speed setting is controlled with your thumb with the control situated next to the strap lug on the right hand side of the camera. 5) press shutter release half way and look through viewfinder and see light meter reading and adjust either shutter speeds or the aperture as explained being guided by the l.meter.

Sep 23, 2007 | Nikon F80D 35mm SLR Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera Logo

206 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Nikon 35mm SLR Cameras Experts


Level 3 Expert

93802 Answers

Ric Donato

Level 2 Expert

201 Answers

Bart Pulverman

Level 2 Expert

354 Answers

Are you a Nikon 35mm SLR Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides