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Computer powers off before loading

My computer powers off before booting windows off there are no beeps at post it just turns off after the memory check

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CoolDragon is right. If you have two RAM boards or more, you might even try booting with each one separately, until the computer works, then you'll know which one is bad. Also, you might first try removing and replacing them, it might just be a foreign object (dust, etc.) in a contct preventing the board from making full contact.

Posted on Jan 24, 2008

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If it happens just after the memory test, it could be due to bad RAM chips. Try replacing them.

Posted on Jan 24, 2008

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Quickest way to check if motherboard has problems


If it makes it to the POST (Power-ON Self Test; before the windows/mac boot logo) screen, you're pretty close to golden. You could run a memory diagnostic (such as memtest86+) and/or prime95 in stress testing mode to see if the system is stable.

If the MOBO is bad, the computer, at the most, will sit at a blank screen (never getting to POST). 98% of the time it won't even turn on. Some have diagnostic beeps when booting to POST. If the computer originally had 1 short beep when turned on (when it was working), it may produce multiple short or long beeps. If it never beeped to begin with just disregard this.

The other alternative is manufacturer utilities. The computer or motherboard maker usually has a set of utilities to test the hardware. You'd be able to find it at their website in the support section.

There's a link at the bottom for more information about the POST operation.

Power on self test

May 03, 2016 | Computers & Internet

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How to isolate issues between hardware and software


<p>It has been one of the dilemma of computer users is to identify what is really causing the failure in their computer. Often they think that they bought a defective product since they are getting these kind of errors in the computer. Having an error on your machine does not mean that the machine is defective or needs parts replacement. for all we know it might just need some simple troubleshooting steps to fix the issue. Here is a tip where you would be able to know if you need to bring your computer to a service shop for parts replacement or you can try to fix it at home by doing some troubleshooting steps that would help fix software failure in the computer system.<br /> <br /> On a Windows based operating system, you should always know when the issue happens. It will help much to observe your computer on how it boots up and what it does before you get to the desktop screen. Take a note on where and when exactly the error occurs.<br /> <br /><b> Power Failure:</b><br /> <br /> This is an issue where there are no lights on the power button of your computer, whether it is a portable system or a desktop computer. Obviously this is a hardware failure. surprisingly, discharging the flea power of your computer sometimes resolves these kinds of issues. Otherwise, you will definitely need to have a local technician look at your system for parts replacement.<br /> <br /><b> Note:</b> flea power is the charged power of our computer system. A computer system is made up of electronic components such as capacitors which hold electronic charges. To be able to discharge it, you should disconnect all power source from your computer and hold the power button for at least 5 seconds.<br /> <br /> <br /><b> POST Failure:</b><br /> <br /> POST is an abbreviation for Power On Self Test. as the name implies, it is the test that a system goes through to test the basic hardware components needed for a computer to boot. The components that it tests are as follows: Processor, BIOS (Motherboard), Memory, keyboard and video card. If there is a POST failure, the system would give you a black screen with lights on the front panel. Sometimes it will give you beeping sounds which would normally mean that you have a memory failure on your system. If you encounter such issue, you will need hardware technical support to guide you isolate further on what could be causing the failure.<br /> <br /><b> Boot Failure:</b><br /> <br /> Boot failure is when the computer is able to complete post. You will be able to know this if you hear a single beep on your computer. Isolating a boot failure from a post failure simply requires you to boot to the System Setup/configuration Screen (BIOS). If you are able to get to the BIOS, that means all the POST hardware component are good to go. However, booting to the BIOS differs per system. You just need to do trial and error on the following keys to tap as you turn your computer on.<br /> <br /> Del<br /> F1<br /> F2<br /> F10<br /> F9<br /> ESC<br /> <br /> To isolate an issue whether it is a software or a hardware issue, you just need to boot from the BIOS. If you are able to boot from the BIOS, chances are it is not a hardware failure and needs servicing.<br /> <br /> <p><img src="vincent_von_0.jpg" /><br /> <p><br /> If booting to the BIOS works, to further isolate the issue whether it is the advanced software, you need to boot to Safe mode. Safe mode is a troubleshooting state where only the basic applications and drivers are active. If you are having errors or boot failure, try to boot to Safe Mode. If you do not encounter the failure in Safe Mode, that means that there are advanced software being loaded in your operating system that fails. It is just a matter of knowing what that software is.<br /> <br /><b> Booting to Safe Mode:</b><br /> <br /> 1. turn computer on and tap on F8 before Windows starts.<br /> 2. You will be getting the Advanced Boot options. Use the arrow keys to get to the option for Safe Mode.<br /> <br /> <p><img src="vincent_von_0.png" /><br /> <p><br /> <p><br /><b> Safe Mode Definitions:</b><br /> <br /> Safe Mode: Just basic software are being loaded. Network drivers are not included which means no internet connection<br /> <br /> Safe Mode with Networking: Basic software and Network drivers are being loaded.<br /> <br /> note: for Vista or Windows 7, it includes wireless network drivers. This means that you can still connect to the internet with a wireless connection. In Windows XP, the wireless driver is not included even if you boot to Safe Mode with Networking<br /> <br /> Safe Mode with Command prompt: this is a troubleshooting state where you will be able to utilize DOS based commands.

on Jul 15, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Computer will turn on but will not boot up


Dear,
Did this situation come with any beep sound. Because, most of the time, in this situation; the computer beeps. Here are some codes. Check if any of these condition apply to your system.

No Beeps Short, No power, Bad CPU/MB, Loose Peripherals
One Beep Everything is normal and Computer POSTed fine
Two Beeps POST/CMOS Error
One Long Beep, One Short Beep Motherboard Problem
One Long Beep, Two Short Beeps Video Problem
One Long Beep, Three Short Beeps Video Problem
Three Long Beeps Keyboard Error
Repeated Long Beeps Memory Error
Continuous Hi-Lo Beeps CPU Overheating

best of luck!

Mar 07, 2012 | Gateway 510XL (2800446) PC Desktop

2 Answers

Getting 3 beeps on my MSI 870-G45 motherborad


If they're happening during POST (After the bios screen loads but before the OS boots), it could mean a memory error. Also, it can depend on the length. If they're three short beeps, it's the memory. Long and short combinations mean different things as well. You can find a good description of different beep codes in the source.

You can verify a memory error using memtest86+. It's a burnable ISO you can easily find on google. Turn it on and let it go and it will let you know if any tests fail. If they do, it could just be one of your cards. Try taking one of the cards out and turning the computer on to see if it still beeps. If it does, switch cards. Also try putting them in different slots. Usually the combination of switching cards/slots will let you know if it's a bad card, or a bad slot.

Source: http://ec.transcendusa.com/helpdetail.asp?Help_No=70 - beep codes
Everything else is experience :)

May 28, 2011 | MSI 870G45 AM3 AMD 770 ATX AMD Motherboard

1 Answer

My dv6-1247 cl when i turn on the power it beep 8 times and the screen does not come on help


Yu will need to determine which BIOS you have a see below
The computer beeps several times
If you hear several beeps from the PC speaker, it means that the computer failed its power-on self test (POST) because a problem was detected. The POST is a procedure that tests several components such as power, BIOS, CPU, memory, and video. Only if all those tests pass, the computer will then allow the operating system to load. But if one or more of these tests fail, beeps indicate a problem and the boot process is halted. These errors are a little more difficult to troubleshoot.
To diagnose the problem, listen to the beeps carefully and write down the sequence. Is it one long beep? Is it several short beeps? How many? Once you have the beep sequence documented, you need to find out what it means. What BIOS do you have? When you first turn on the PC, look at the top of the first screen to find out. Common BIOS types are Award, Phoenix, and AMI.
Award:
1-2-2 Indicates a video error has occurred and the BIOS cannot initialize the video screen to display any additional information Any other beeps Most likely a RAM problemYou can find more detailed information about Award error messages on Award's web site.
Phoenix:
1-2-2 Indicates a video error has occurred and the BIOS cannot initialize the video screen to display any additional information 1-2-2-3 BIOS ROM Checksum 1-3-1-1 Test DRAM Refresh 1-3-1-3 Test Keyboard Controller 1-3-4-1 RAM Failure 1-3-4-3 RAM Failure 2-1-2-3 Check ROM Copyright Notice 2-2-3-1 Test for unexpected interrupts 1-3-4-3 RAM FailureYou can find more detailed information about Phoenix error messages on Phoenix's web site.
AMI:
1 beep Refresh failure 2 beeps Parity error 3 beeps Base 64K memory failure 4 beeps Timer not operational 5 beeps Processor error 6 beeps 8042 - gate A20 failure 7 beeps Processor exception interrupt error 8 beeps Display memory read/write failure 9 beeps ROM checksum error 10 beeps CMOS shutdown register read/write error 11 beeps Cache memory badYou can find more detailed information about AMI error messages on AMI's web site.
If you get beep errors, you should try to think what happened right before they started. Did you add a new piece of hardware? If so, it might be faulty or not installed right. Remove it, then try again. If everything is fine without the hardware, try to reinstall and configure the hardware again. If that does not help, try exchanging it and see if that corrects the problem. If the error persists, narrow it down systematically. Remove everything but the CPU, memory, keyboard, and video card, then boot again. Does the error still occur? If not, then add one piece of hardware and try again. Repeat until one new component causes the error and you now know who the culprit is. If yes, then reseat your CPU, memory and video card and try again. If the error still happens, try replacing the CPU, video card and memory one by one to see if one of them is the troublemaker. If that does not help, you could have a bad motherboard. Check the motherboard carefully for any signs of damage. Also check for shorts, a metallic object could have found its way onto the motherboard, or the motherboard is not installed correctly and touches the case somewhere.
Page 1: Computer boot problems
Page 2: This page
Page 3: System hanging after POST
Page 4: POST running OK but Windows not starting

Good luck

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Apr 02, 2011 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Problem with ASUS P5GD1 mobo


Is the cpu fan working, remove all the memory,but one stick, then try each stick you have. Then, When you get your post, enter safe mode, this does not use full video, so if you can, and it works in safe mode, it is probably your video, if not it is either
your power supply or another piece of hardware.

Unless you installed something on windows just before this problem.

Post back if you need more help, any code errors would be great to post.

Feb 05, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

At start up, before windows loads, a consistent series of annoying beeping occurs....


If they're occurring right as you turn the computer on, it's your Power On Self Test (aka POST) letting you know. Since I can't be more specific, here's a synopsis of POST beeps:

One single beep followed by three, four, or five beeps -- System-board problems, possibly with DMA, CMOS setup chip, timer, or system bus. The computer usually won't boot when this is the problem.

Two beeps -- The POST numeric code is displayed on the monitor, usually nothing to be concerned about, but you might google the code on another computer and see what you get.

Two beeps followed be three, four, or five beeps -- First 64K of RAM has errors. Solution is to replace RAM.

Three beeps followed by three, four, or five beeps -- Keyboard controller failed or video controller failed. Either you won't be able to see or type with this error.

Four beeps followed by three, four, or five beeps -- Problem with serial or parallel ports, system timer, or time of day. Check your BIOS settings (usually F2 at start up) to make sure everything is correct.

Continuous beeps - problem with power supply. Probably won't do much with this error. At the very best, your computer will boot and run very, very slowly.

Hope that helped.

Sep 01, 2009 | Compaq Computers & Internet

1 Answer

No Post No Video Just Beeps


Clear the cemos battery and change the slot you place you memory

Aug 23, 2009 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Desk top emachine powers on


You state that thre are no beeps coming from the PC upon boot. If you remove the memory entirely and reboot, you should get a series of BIOS post tones. If you do not get these, I would first test your power supply to make sure it is working properly. If it is, you most likely have a failed hardware component: either motherboard or processor. If you get no post tones without memory loaded and with a known good power supply, the motherboard will be your problem child.

If you DO get post tones with a known good power supply, try replacing memory 1 stick at a time (if you have more than 1). If 1 works, you have your culprit. If neither work, then you most likely have a bad processor.

Process of elimination...sucks sometimes :-(

Jun 18, 2009 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

2 Answers

Blank screen with beeping sound


when a computer turns on it performs a POST (Power On Self Test) it check everything to see if everything is Kosher if so then it loads drivers then boots the OS (thanks to the BIOS) but if it come upon an error it immediately halts the POST and gives you a code...if it finds a problem after the drivers load (like the lake of an OS for example) then it would display the error rather that beep it...either way it wants to inform u of the error. based on ur situation the error was found prior to the loading of the drives. i recommend no doing anything and taking it to the geeks at geeksquad or someother PC service place (dont go to the flash attractive PC places however) hopefull the geeks at geeksquad will help you...

May 16, 2009 | HP Computers & Internet

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