Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

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I have loved this camera but everytime I take a flash picture it causes the subjects to close their eyes. I've never had this problem with other cameras. Is the flash not timed properly or is it too bright? Can you help?

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Are you using the red-eye setting? An initial flash causes the pupils of your subjects to contract, followed by a second full flash 1 second later.

The trouble is that the first flash is bright, and subjects think its all over so they blink, rub their eyes, look away, and even the photographer may be pointing the camera elesewhere by then.

It is better not to use that setting, and fix the red eye afterwards.
With the flash open, hit the right button until the eye icon goes away.

Posted on Dec 14, 2009

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Every picture has red eye


That's because of the flash position being so close to the center of the lens. You are not alone with this problem as pretty well every point and shoot camera will suffer some type of flash red eye.

Some of the upper level pint and shoot have a red eye reduction mode that can be used check your manual. What this does is sends out a high intensity light so your subject's pupils will close down then the pictures is made. Others will have a red eye correction function built into the camera. If you have Photoshop I believe under tools there is a red eye correction tool. I'm using Photoshop CS4 and it's in that and I believe it's on PS 7 and PS 5 I'm not sure if Elements has it or not.

There isn't a whole lot you can do about it due to the location of the flash. The flash needs to be above the center line of the lens by at least 6 inches and even then depending on the subject to camera distance it's possible to get red eye.

Mar 04, 2011 | Kodak EasyShare C330 Digital Camera

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Red eyes appear in all my photos how do I eliminate that? Also if I am taking photos outdoors on a snowy day with not much sunlight how can I get good photos?


Red eye is cause by the internal flash being mounted to close to the lens center axes and is a common problem with most all cameras built this way. Many manufactures have attempted to use "red eye" reduction which fires a pre-flash to close the subjects retina before the actual flash for exposure. Does it work in my opinion no it just cause the subject to think "Oh there's the flash the picture has been taken" and they move while the actual pictures is being made. Yet others tried to send a high intensity light in the subjects direction and that wasn't much better. To get around the red eye with a point and shoot camera you need to get the flash away from the camera. It's called "Off Camera" for your camera it would require an optional digital flash that will sync with the camera flash shutter speed mounted to a bracket that holds the flash above the camera at least 4 inches. However in the case of a pocket camera such as what you have, there now comes the problem of how to trigger the optional off camera flash. This can be done but requires a little non intrusive hacking and a piece of aluminum foil. All this extra gear has now pretty much destroyed the concept of a pocket point and shooter but you asked how to eliminate it as well. The U bracket and flash can be obtained through camera accessory manufactures another item you will need is a photo cell slave mounted on the flash which is mounted to the U bracket. T tripper the flash a small piece of reflective foil is taped in front of the flash angling the reflected light towards the photo cell slave. The slave "sees" the flash from the camera and triggers the optional flash. There are no wires involved so in fact this second flash could be mounted on a tripod to the side of the subject just as long as the camera flash is directed toward it. Once you get one optional flash to fire it is possible to connect multiple flash units using slave cells and create a studio lighting effect. You have now taken a point and shoot camera and turned it into a studio camera cool huh? Okay to address your second problem I feel as if I have to tell you what is happening before i explain what to do. Due to the mass amount of snow and possible overcast conditions you camera built in light meter "sees" this as a lot of light and closed down the aperture and or increases shutter speed, which in fact will under expose the scene. To work around this problem you need to switch you camera off any type of auto exposure zone and go to a manual setting. Look at the cameras light meter reading and purposely over expose it in most cases by two stops of light. I know this most likely all appears to complicated BUT, it's not beyond the capacity of your camera.

Dec 26, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SD750 / IXUS 75 Digital...

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Everytime I snap a picture, the camera flashes three times. Help!


The camera is in Red-eye Reduction mode. The preflashes are intended to get the subject's pupils to contract, reducing the red-eye look.

Press MENU to display the menu. Press right-arrow to select the toolbox icon (Setup). Press the arrow keys to select Red Eye Reduction, and turn it off.

May 14, 2010 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-S40 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Red eye on sanyo digital camera xacti,always theres a red eye when taking pictures,i already adjusted everything,still occuring red eye.


Do you mean your subject's eyes are showing "redeye"? This is a common problem with cameras that have the flash very close to the lens. Almost every photo editing program has a tool to remove red-eye. Check your computer to see what you have installed. In the future, most cameras have a red-eye flash setting which shoots a short flash before the main flash to close down the pupils in your subjects eyes to eliminate red-eye. You could also turn up the lights in the room...sometimes that helps.

Apr 28, 2010 | Sanyo Xacti VPC-T700 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Pictures that I take come out very white/bright. you cannot tell details. I have changed batteries and have the setting on auto.


Double-check your flash settings. You mentioned the camera is in Auto mode, but the flash has separate settings from the camera's shooting mode. With the camera in shooting mode AUTO check the Flash settings (Auto, Red-Eye Reduction, Fill-In, Off) It may be set to 'fill' causing your photos to be too bright.

Also, depending on how close you are to your subject the flash may not be needed. Using the flash when too close to your subject (less then 3 ft.) will cause bright/white photos. Turn the flash OFF if you are taking macro or photos closer then 3ft.

If neither of these fix your problem, turn the flash mode OFF, and camera shooting mode to AUTO and in a naturally well lit area, take a photo, if the photo is still too bright, you may have something mechanically wrong with your camera.

Nov 03, 2009 | Olympus FE-210 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Blurry and out of focus


Hey ammarhazem,
What is most likely the cause of your blurry pictures is that the on camera flash is not powerful enough to provide light coverage to your subject and the movement of your subject is causing the blurry images. Another problem I see is that you are shooting in Program mode, because in program mode you should have no control over the aperture and if your subject is far away and you are using the on camera flash you would want as wide of an aperture as you can get. I would shoot in aperture priority where you can choose the aperture and the camera sets the shutter for you and I would also invest in a more powerful hotshoe mounted flash. In regards to your red eye problem it is probably due to the distance of your subject from the flash also. How red eye reduction works is the flash fires a # of times prior to the exposure to shrink the pupils so the flash doesn't reflect of the subjects retina which produces the red eye problem. A hotshoe mounted flash would also solve this problem because the angle of the flash would not be as parallel to the lens as the on camera flash would be. I hope this helps!

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.

May 29, 2008 | Olympus EVOLT E-500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Red Eye


If the red-eye reduction is turned on, and you can verify that the pre-flash is functioning, you may need to think about shooting technique. With ultra-compact cameras, the flash is necessarily placed close to the lens. This is the worst design possible to avoid red-eye. To reduce red-eye as much as possible, ensure the red-eye reduction system is turned on (and functioning properly), and get close to the subject. I mean "physically" close, not just close by zooming. Use as little zoom as possible. If the subject is small, move closer, without relying on the zoom lens to make the subject appear closer.

Mar 08, 2008 | Canon PowerShot SD1000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Red Eye


Does your camera's flash have a redeye reduction mode? It should tell you in your camera's manual. Some cameras use a pre-flash method which causes the flash to fire several times in succession before firing the shutter in order to give the subject's eyes time to adjust to the bright light.

Redeye is actually caused by the flash being too close to the camera's lens. That's why you see professional photographers using a flash attached to their cameras by a cable so they can move it away from the lens. Because you have a compact camera, there is no way to change this flash to lens distance.

You might also try just turning the flash off. Unless you are taking pictures in a very dark area, you may find the results to be very satisfactory.

Dec 26, 2007 | Fuji FinePix A500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash causing a white out!


you are possibly using it too close to subject. Make a softening/dimming filter with layer of tissue paper over the flash- the more tissue the less light gets out

May 23, 2007 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W30 Digital Camera

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