Question about Intel ASUS Pundit Celeron 2.0GHz Slim Computer System (SYSINTCMM03) Barebone

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Manual I have an intel celeron 1100 mhz and would like to add memory. It currently has 384? in memory. What is the max it can accept?

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Re: manual - Intel ASUS Pundit Celeron 2.0GHz Slim Computer System (SYSINTCMM03) Barebone Barebone Systems

Check mb. documentation

Posted on Jan 28, 2008

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MSI MS 163c motherboard processor upgrade

Doubtful. You can only go up to a T1500 on your board.

Jul 06, 2013 | MSI MS-163K Barebone

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I cant overclock my system but i go to bios now whati had to do

The BIOS. Overclocking is best done in the computer's BIOS (Basic Input/Output System or Binary Integrated Operating System). There are also some motherboards that let you do a basic increase in power by setting a jumper, but this is dangerous and you have no real stability control.

There are some software programs available which allow you to overclock inside the operating system, but the best results are achieved by changing BIOS settings. Usually you can get into your BIOS by pressing DEL (some systems may use F2, F10, or Ctrl-Enter) as soon as your computer begins the POST

(Power On Self Test - when it shows the RAM size, processor speed, etc.).

Here, you can change your FSB (front side bus), memory timings, and your CPU multiplier (also referred to as CPU Clock Ratio).

Clearing your CMOS. Sometimes, an overclock can become unstable. If this happens, or your computer will not boot, you will need to reset the BIOS back to default and start over again.

This is done by clearing the CMOS (a small piece of memory on the motherboard which stores your BIOS configuration, and is powered by a small battery). Some newer motherboards will bypass user settings in the CMOS if the computer fails POST (often caused by a faulty overclock). However, most motherboards require a manual clear.

This can be done in two ways, depending on your motherboard. The first way is by changing the position of the clear CMOS jumper on your motherboard, waiting a few minutes, then repositioning the jumper to its original place.

The CMOS Jumper

The second way, if your motherboard doesn't have this jumper, consists of unplugging your computer, removing the little CMOS battery, then pressing the power button (your capacitors will discharge), and waiting a couple of minutes.

Then you have to refit the battery and plug in your computer. Once your CMOS is cleared, all BIOS settings are reset back to default and you'll have to start the overclocking process all over again. Just so you know, this step is only necessary if your overclock becomes unstable.

Locked or Unlocked. The first thing to know when you start the process of overclocking, is whether your processor is multiplier locked or unlocked.

To check whether your CPU is locked, lower your multiplier via the BIOS one step, for example from 11 to 10.5. Save and exit your BIOS and your computer will restart.

If your computer posts again and shows the new CPU speed, it means your CPU is unlocked. However, if your computer failed to post (screen remains black) or no CPU speed change is present, this means your multiplier is locked

Multiplier Unlocked Processors. Usually, your max overclock is limited by your memory, or RAM. A good starting place is to find the top memory bus speed in which your memory can handle while keeping it in sync with the FSB. To check this, lower your CPU multiplier some steps (from 11 to 9, for example) and increase your FSB a few notches (e.g.: 200 MHz to 205 MHz).

After this, save and exit your BIOS. There are a few ways to test for stability.

If you make it into Windows, that is a good start. You can try running a few CPU / RAM intensive programs to stress these components. Some good examples are SiSoft Sandra, Prime95, Orthos, 3DMark 2006 and Folding@Home.

You may also choose to run a program outside of Windows, such as Memtest. Load a copy of Memtest onto a bootable floppy, then insert the disk after you have exited the BIOS.

Continue to increase your FSB until Memtest starts reporting errors. When this happens, you can try to increase the voltage supplied to your memory.

Do note that increasing voltages may shorten the life span of your memory. Also, another option is to loosen the timings on the memory (more on this a bit later). The previous FSB setting before the error will be your max FSB. Your max FSB will fully depend on what memory you have installed. Quality, name-brand memory will work best for overclocking.

Now that you know your max FSB, you'll figure out your max multiplier. Keeping your FSB @ stock, you raise your multiplier one step at a time. Each time you restart, check for system stability. As mentioned above, one good way to do this is by running Prime95.

If it doesn't post (reread the section about clearing the CMOS), or Prime 95 fails, you can try to raise the core voltage a bit. Increasing it may or may not increase stability. On the other hand, the temperature will also be increased. If you are going to increase the core voltage, you should keep an eye on temperatures, at least for a few minutes.

Also note that increasing voltages may shorten the life span of your CPU, not to mention void your warranty. When your computer is no longer stable at a given multiplier setting, lower your multiplier one step and take that as your max multiplier.

Now that you have your max FSB speed and your max multiplier, you can play around and determine the best settings for your system. Do note that having a higher FSB overclock as opposed to a higher multiplier will have a greater impact on overall system performance.

hope this helps

May 30, 2012 | Barebone Systems

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Im using foxcom N15235 motherboard with Phonix-AwardBIOS v6.00PG Procerssor Intel(R) Celeron(R)CPU 430@1.80GHz Memory:896RAM DirectX 9.0c But i can play games wat must i buy so i can play pc video games

You may not need to upgrade your computer to play PC games.
I recommend before you purchase a PC game, have a look at the PC requirements on the packaging on the box for that game you wish to buy and it will state the minimum PC requirements for that PC game.

May 20, 2012 | Foxconn Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Sir/Maam, i have intel celeron D331 processor 775 lga socket . i want to upgrade Motherboard, can i use ecs G31T-M7 (775 lga socket)? if not, what board brand/model do i have to use?i want latest ddr2...

As long as the socket is the right type for the processor, you can use the motherboard. Just be aware that changing the motherboard won't make the processor any faster, so you might not see a big performance improvement unless you upgrade the processor along with the motherboard and RAM. Many vendors offer package pricing on motherboard/CPU combinations, so you may want to look into that.

Jun 26, 2011 | Intel Barebone Systems

1 Answer

I am facing the problem of since one year not detecting sound drivers in my PC. configuration:O/S win7 ultimate 32bit, system manufactures: eSys, system model :p4m800/478, processor : intel celeron...

Please download the later driver from HERE
Unpack the driver file(s) into

Install the sound driver from one of this directory.

Feb 15, 2011 | VIA Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Sir i have purchased mercury PI 945 GZD MOTHER BORAD BUT I AM NOT diceded which processor support this board pls help me

Designed for the latest Intel® Core™ 2 Duo/ Pentium(Dual-Core inside)/ Pentium D/Pentium 4/ Celeron D Processors with LGA775 Socket ...

Jun 20, 2010 | Intel Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Are OCZ PC3 1333 ddr3 1.65v memory compatible with

Intel's web site for the board has the following:

The Desktop Board supports the following memory:

  • Four 240-pin Double Data Rate 3 (DDR3) SDRAM Dual Inline Memory Module (DIMM) connectors with gold-plated contacts arranged in two channels
  • 1333/1066 MHz DDR3 SDRAM interface
  • Support for single- and dual-channel memory interleaving
  • Unbuffered, non-registered single- or double-sided DIMMs with a voltage rating of less than 1.6 V. Using a DIMM with a voltage rating higher than 1.6 V may damage the processor.
  • Non-ECC DDR3 memory
  • Serial Presence Detect (SPD) memory only
  • Up to 16 GB maximum total system memory
You need to contact TigerDirect and have them change out the memory for sticks that meet the above specs.

Jan 25, 2010 | Intel Barebone Systems

1 Answer

Watch movies-net isnt working?

Install adobe flash player and Apple Quicktime player.. It will be worked.
Good Luck

Mar 07, 2009 | Intel ASUS Pundit Celeron 2.0GHz Slim...

3 Answers


Your laptop can have up to 1 GB of memory. You should have two slots and you can install 512 MB per slot. Your laptop is using 200 Pin DDR PC2100 266 MHz CL 2.5 SODIMM. You can also install PC3200, but your laptop will clock it down to 266 MHz.


Feb 27, 2008 | ASUS A2H (A2HOB) Barebone

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