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Furnace not blowing hot air but cold, gurgling sound from the unit, likely condensation lines.

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Hi,
It sounds like a vent pipe sagged or the condensate drain trap is plugged.
You did not say what make and model furnace you have so I'll have to give you some generic intructions.

(1) Find the condensate trap and pull a plastic hose off of it and blow it out as best you can. Also you can pull the bigger hose that most furnaces have at the bottom of the heat exchanger off and blow through it.
Check all of the hoses to make sure that they are not plugged or filled with water. Methodically go through each one carefully pulling and replaceing exactly where they came from. Do not just pull all the hoses and expect to remember where they came from.

(2) Check the intake and exhaust pipes, assuming that this is a two pipe furnace. If there is water build up in the exhaust pipes the furnace will not operate.
Check for places that the pipe could be sagged or trapped. Even a sag will allow enough water to pool in the pipe and stop it.

I hope that this will help you to solve your problem!

Thanks for using Fixya!!

Heatman101

Posted on Dec 10, 2009

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Due to the many different questions I see about Air Conditioning, I am including this overview to help us better understand each other for trouble shooting. A basic air conditioning system has a Thermostat, Air Handler or Furnace Fan and a Condensing unit. In a split system, the condensing unit (Condenser) is separate from the furnace and usually in the back yard. When working properly, it blows hot air. It connects to the cooling part of the system by 2 copper lines. One large line and 1 small line. The part that cools the house is the "Evaporator" and is usually on top of the furnace inside the square metal box (Plenum). When the Air Conditioner is running, the large copper line should be cold and the smaller line should be warm. Common signs of low refrigerant are that both lines are the same temperature and/or frost or ice has built up on the large line at the condenser. The thermostat will normally display room temperature on till it is touched to change the setting. It could have a "Span" setting as well as times and temperatures. The operating "span" of MOST residential thermostats is 40 to 90 degrees. That means you can set it as low as 40 degrees and no higher than 90 degrees. It probably has a fan switch also. When in the "ON" position, the fan will run constantly, 24 / 7, but the condenser will still cycle on and off as needed to keep the house at set point. If you have a suggestion to include in this paragraph, please let me know.

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