Question about Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

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I tae potrait using apurture 8 but the sharpness i want cant get from it please advice

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First of all, tell me what kind of lens you are using. for example 50mm f1.4., 135mm f 2.8,
and how close to the object from where you stood.


Posted on Jan 26, 2008

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I am a novice photographer, have a nikon 2020 af for 15yrs & it just stopped taking pics. Everything else works

did you clean all contacts? never use anything sharp in or closet to a camera. To clean contacts in a camera and on the batteries, just use a dry cloth and a cotton swab. My 20 year old camera's (same brand and a canon) still work as the first day I used them. they are always stored dry and without a battery, when I don't use the for a longer period.
Recheck the manual (yes most manuals from Nikon are still online) if you did setup the camera correct.

Apr 09, 2014 | Nikon N2020 35mm SLR Camera

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My pictures have a purple tint to them

You're either using old/expired film, or taking photos during dusk. Color film is balanced for daylight photography. Using it under conditions other than that will result in varying color casts on the resulting images.

Fluorescent lighting: Greenish
Indoor bulbs: Reddish/orange
Outdoor at night/dusk: Blueish/purpla
Ourdoor at dawn: Pink/blue

Or, you may have just gotten bad print work done. Try a different lab.

Jun 12, 2011 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

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Best film for Vivitar V3800N 35mm camera

With modern film technology, use whichever one you wish, they're all good.

The differences between brands (even supermarket/drugstore own brands) is largely one of personal preference: some provide more vivid colours which suit certain subjects but to some they look unrealistic, others have a more subdued colour but to some they look too dull. In practice you probably won't notice the difference as the final colours depend upon which company processes the film and prints the photos, the machines they use, the brand of photo paper, the individual human operator, and whether for economy reasons they've stretched the life of their processing chemicals longer than recommended.

What make a bigger difference is film speed. Slower speeds (lower ISO numbers) give finer image resolution but need longer exposures, faster films (higher ISO) allow faster shutter speeds or smaller aperture settings (or both) but give a less detailed image. But it's true that a modern ISO400 film isn't much worse than the ISO100 films were back in the early 1970's. Given the modest maximum aperture of the lens you have I'd recommend that you avoid using IS0100 film unless you know that you'll be shooting the roll in bright lighting conditions. ISO200 is your best all-rounder unless you have longer telephoto lenses in which case you'll find that ISO400 is a better choice.

You can also save a lot of money if you buy out of date film: if it's been stored in cool conditions it's usually good for at least a year after the expiry date, but if you wish to use slide (a.k.a. transparency) film then it's best to reduce that to no more than six months.

The biggest difference to image quality is you and your understanding of how to use the camera, and the single best investment you'll make will be a tripod and shutter release cable: used together you can eliminate camera shake and ensure that your photos are as sharp as possible. Even a small bean bag can be used instead of a tripod if there's something to rest it on.

In short, you'll only find "your" best film by using lots of it, regularly, and experimenting to find a good photo lab and then sticking with it for as long as they do a good job.

Good luck, and I hope that I've helped you. Please feel free to ask me for further clarification if anything I've written is not clear enough, and when you're happy with my answer please take a moment to rate my reply.

Apr 30, 2010 | Vivitar V3800N 35mm SLR Camera

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I dont understand the depth of feid button

Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

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I put the film in the camera, turned on the camera, and the camera will not wind the film. The screen flashes "Err"...I don't know how to solve this.

Just do reset first by taking the battery for 3 hours,if reset button is not available. Then after 3 hours put it back again and see what is the result. If reset does not fix then camera has an internal problem. There are two common problem if the film will not wind . First is the gear is damaged already that can't drive the film and secondly the motor is faulty already.

Good luck:

Don't forget to rate:

Jul 08, 2009 | Nikon N75 QD 35mm SLR Camera

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How do i take photos indoors/ what settings do i use?


well first how far away from the stage will you be?
will you be using available light or a flash unit?
shutter speed and f-stop depend on the light source and film speed. (iso )
the faster the film the less you have to use flash, the lower the f-stop the less depth of field you have, the kind of flash is important, most flash units are good for only around 20 ft.
i would use a high speed film and not use flash. flash will kill any colored lights. try to keep the f-stop at least f/8 and the shutter speed no less than 1/60 sec. have fun.

Dec 13, 2008 | Nikon F60 35mm SLR Camera

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put simply the ISO number is how sensitive the film is to light, the higher the number the more sensitive the film. The ISO on the camera sets the exposure system to give the proper exposure for that film (the f/n80 usually sets the ISO automaticly). Also the higher the ISO the more grainy the picture, I would recommend using ISO 200 film for the pictures you describe. I would set the camera to the P setting it is a good all-around setting.

Nov 18, 2008 | Nikon F80 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Nikon F4s battery holder

I have always found Nikon to be extremely good with spare parts.

Have you gone to a camera store and asked them to order in a replacement battery holder? This will not be an "on the shelf" item. The camera is 20 odd years old, after all! but I suspect that (after a long wait) you should get your part.

If the camera store will not order in the part, try contacting Nikon direct.

Good luck.

May 20, 2008 | Nikon F4s 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Developing pictures

depending on the type of film you are using and where you are taking it could be the problem. if you are using professional film and taking it to a pharmacy to get developed, the chemicals used at these places will erase the images off the film and appear as if the film is blank.

Nov 11, 2007 | Nikon N75 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Premature Film Rewinding

the only thing that I could think of when I read your situation is, that you might not be using a DX coated films. see, the camera reads the bar code on the film and maybe it is not the same program. check the camear manual and make sure you are using the same kind of the suggested film in the manual. good luck

Apr 11, 2007 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

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