Question about Meade LX200GPS Telescope

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Poor viewing I have a 10" lx200 gps, and I can't see things like detail on mars or jupiter, I can see the rings on saturn, but not the cassini division, When I do the collimation test as described in the manual I see the dark black circle (secondary mirror) and a wide bright bigger circle caused by the star, this light is solid and is the same distance in each direction, not the lines that they show in the manual. any ideas John

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You don't state if the collimation is a plain view through the back plate at the sky, or with an evepiece. The description that you gave suggests that that is a view through the telescope back without an eyepiece. The images in the Meade manual are at high power (200x) on either side of focus. What you want to see is circular rings around a star on either side of the best focus point. If the rings are not concentric, then the collimation is off. Other factors can affect the clairity of the image, such as dirt on the optics (need to be really bad to affect the image), or you may be using a poor quality eyepiece.

Posted on May 22, 2008

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Sixth planet from the sun?


Saturn.. The first five are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter.

Apr 07, 2017 | The Optics

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I have a T1000HD telescope . I was wondering what I need to do to be able to see planets such as Mars, Jupiter and Saturn's rings. Is it just a matter of getting different eyepieces? If so what kind?


That scope came with a 25 mm and a 10 mm eyepiece, which will give about a x40 and a x100 magnification respectively. If the seeing is good (clear sky, not dusty or windy, and the planet not too low (at least 30 deg up from the horizon) you should get a reasonable view of the planets, with these ep's

If you do not have any ep's you could buy 2 or 3 plossl type ep's (nothing more expensive is justified) of say 10 mm, 25 mm, and 32 mm. It looks like it takes ep's with a 1.25" barrel.

The theoretical limiting power of your scope is about x 220, which is about a 4 mm eyepiece, but at that extreme you will find the viewing object is dim, fuzzy, hard to get into the field of view, hard to focus, and totally frustrating.

Sadly this scope is just not a very good one, sorry to sound elitist. One of the issues will be that of collimation (optical alignment). You can never properly focus the scope unless it is collimated. Reflector scopes (with a mirror) all have this difficulty. You can tell if it is collimated with a star test

http://garyseronik.com/no-tools-telescope-collimation/

There should be 3 screws on the bottom end of the scope, where the mirror is. These are the collimation screws. Have somebody screw these in and out while you look through the ep. Remember you can only assess the collimation when the defocussed star image is right in the middle of your view.
.

Dec 12, 2016 | Optics

1 Answer

Names of the planets


In our solar system:

Mercury
Venus
Earth
Mars
Jupiter
Saturn
Uranus
Neptune
Pluto*

Oct 07, 2013 | Cambridge University Press Planets To...

1 Answer

What is the nine planets ordered from the sun?


Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune.

That's only eight. Pluto, which used to be the ninth planet, was demoted from "planet" to "dwarf planet" a few years ago.

Mar 15, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a Meade EXT90. A black dot appears in the middle of every object I view (Jupiter, Mars, etc) with the exception of the moon. Any ideas on waht that might be? Thank you.


The black dot means you are way out of focus.

In an ETX90 Mars will always be a TINY disk, except under extreme magnification.

Jupiter is also a small disk but a little bit bigger.

Next time you try for Jupiter focus on the MOONS until they are tiny points of light like little stars.

Also certain eyepieces have this as an unwanted trait. Try another eyepiece -- start with the one with the largest number written on it which will be your LOWEST magnification.

Sep 08, 2010 | Meade ETX-90EC (325 x 90mm) Telescope

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Instructions


I"ve been an amateur astronomer for "over" forty years, started when i was eight. Stars aren't that impressive, most look the same....i spend my telescope time with a cheap $200 21/2 inch "Refractor" and have seen all planets except pluto, i had to use a 41/2 inch refractor just to be able to view Neptune and just barely saw it and yes it was Blue!! Refractors are best for planet viewing. Dont waste your time with viewing Mercury or Venus...not impresive! The best looking (but not in the next few years because of ring alignment) is Saturn...hurry up and you might still get a chance to see the rings a little before they go into what i call hibernation mode, they'll make a straight inclination though the planet which makes for not so impressive views...next most impressive and one i view the most is Jupiter and its for moons Calisto, Ganymede Io, and Europa...you will always see these in different orbits. But i just use a pair or Celestron Binoculars 15 x 70s..i use them to look at the Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Comets, overhead comunication Satilites passing bye..and the most awsome of them all the "Orion nebula" colors are outstanding, and if your real good at knowing your constellations you can locate the Andromeda Galaxy. It'll look like a buffy cotton ball with binoculars..dont view the sky ever with a full moon.it makes for poor viewing,but this is where the Reflectors like a 4"Newtonion or lot bigger like at least an eight inch Cassigrain..these telescope are made to view whats called "faint fuzzies", Nebulas, Galaxies, star clusters etc. 40 years ago i cold look up in my local skys and not have to worry about light polution..so i go out to the deserts with just my binoculars...they are so convienient. Start to learn the sky with binoculars...it"ll be well worth it! The one Great thing about binocs is that everything you view is right side up as opposed to telecopes upsidedown. To locate planets they will track within 10 degrees in the path that the sun takes. If you look and see some really bright stars that dont twinkle, chances are that it will be Jupiter, Saturn or Venus..but you will only see Venus in the early mornings or late evenings..Mars is a little trickier, sometimes its small and red and every few years it can be as bright as Jupiter when its at it closest to the earth!
http://www.paulni.co.uk/images/EarthinPerspective.pdf
type in this link i think above i think you enjoy! later.

Apr 02, 2010 | Galileo (G118DX) Telescope

1 Answer

What level magnification do I use to see jupiter or saturn in a telescope?


Your 3.5 inch telescope has a maximum magnification of about 170 power.

This is under perfect sky conditions and a perfectly collimated telescope. Galileo used 30 power magnification to see Saturn's rings and the moons of Jupiter!

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the focuser do not use the 2x barlow if you have one.

Point it at Saturn. You will see the rings. However they are almost slanted directly toward Earth right now. You will only see a thin line going across the planet.

By the end of 2010 they should open up again enough to make out the "ring" shape.

You only need about 50-70 power to view Jupiter or Saturn, or Venus. Mars is smaller and about 100 power to 120 power should permit you to see the disk of the planet (but it's still very small in the eyepiece).

Dec 29, 2009 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Not seeing a larger, more detailed image w/ Bushnell 78-8850.


Currently the rings of Saturn are nearly edge on so you won't see any details in them. Shortly the rings will appear edge on and the ring will disappear completely for a few months. Gradually, they will return and angle more towards Earth at which time you will be able to see some of the ring details.

There are many factors that can reduce your ability to see planetary detail. I had my Celestron 200mm out the other night looking at Saturn but saw no details because the atmosphere was too unstable. There are also limits to what a telescope can realistically view.

There is a general rule of thumb that states you can expect to view 50x per inch of aperture. Your telescope has roughly 5" of aperture. 5 times 50 equals a maximum of 250x. However, this is a guideline. On bad nights like I had you'll never reach that 250x since objects will appear blurry or unstable. On good nights, you can exceed this.

You can calculate your telescope power by dividing your telescope focal length by the focal length of the eyepiece ( that 4,9,20mm number).

An excellent object to look at when it comes back in view is Jupiter. It's always interesting and you can see four of it's moons.

Good luck and clear skies.

-jodair

Mar 30, 2009 | Bushnell North Star 78-8850 Telescope

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