Question about Kenmore 60654 Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Kenmore over the range microwave

My microwave doesn't heat and has a loud hum and I can smell somethign burning. The resistance readings on the transformer appear ok. I have replaced the high voltage diode and no change.

If this is the transformer or the magnetron does it make sense to replace it or should I just buy a new microwave?

Posted by on

  • cshaugh Jan 13, 2008

    More comments on the above:

    I can't find the referenced 'safety instructions' but I assume it has to do with "unplugging" and clearing the charge from the capacitor. Other comments on similar problems suggest magnetron or transformer. How do I tell which is bad? How much would a repairman charge me to fix it (if I take it to him)?

    This unit was built in 2000. Has it run its life and is it cheaper to buy a new one?

  • Anonymous Apr 20, 2008

    Have A kenmore counter microwave, it will not heat and has a loud hum and I can smell something burning everything else works

×

Ad

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

  • Contributor
  • 1 Answer

Buy

Posted on Sep 26, 2008

  • abnrunner Sep 26, 2008

    purchase a new one.

×

Ad

1 Suggested Answer

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

Ad

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Maytag MMV4205AAB Making a loud noise once turned on, and not heating food


Hello,

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat food and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise.

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Regards.
Walesarumi

Sep 27, 2011 | Maytag MMV4205 Microwave Oven

Tip

What to do if your microwave oven does not heat and you hear a loud buzzing or...


Hello,<br /><br />Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise:<br /><br />Power Diode<br /><br />A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.<br /><br />Testing a diode<br /><br />NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.<br /><br />Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.<br /><br />A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.<br /><br />With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.<br /><br />A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.<br /><br />Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.<br /><br />High Voltage Capacitor<br /><br />A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.<br /><br />Magnetron<br /><br />A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.<br /><br />Testing a magnetron<br /><br />NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.<br /><br />There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:<br /><br />TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.<br /><br />TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.<br /><br />Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.<br /><br />http://<a href="http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor">www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode</a><br /><br />http://<a href="http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor">www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor</a><br /><br />I hope the above is helpful.<br />

on Dec 02, 2010 | Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

It is making a funny noise plus has an electrical burning smell and won't heat.


Hello,

The funny noise is usually called a humming sound. When the microwave begins to bring out this type of sound, it refuses to heat. Below is troubleshooting tip and a fix;

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a noise....

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Apr 10, 2011 | GE Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

Oven has loud hum but will no longer heat food.LRM1260SW Purchased Oct. 09


Hello,

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a loud humming noise/sound.

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Apr 08, 2011 | LG Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

GE Spacemaker microwave works but does not heat. Model # JVM1440WD003.


Hello,

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise:

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Take care.

Feb 15, 2011 | GE Spacemaker JVM1640SJ Microwave Oven

1 Answer

It just started making a louder humming noise and now it doesnt heat up anything at all? any suggestions?


Hello,

Investigate these three areas if your microwave won't heat and you hear a loud buzzing or humming noise:

Power Diode

A diode is an electronic component that readily passes current in one direction only and blocks the flow of current in the opposing direction. If your microwave's diode has become defective, your microwave will not heat and you will hear a buzzing noise. Test the diode to determine if this is the cause of your problem. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a diode

NOTE: Before you test your diode, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you discharge the microwave's capacitor.

Whether it is shorted or open, a defective diode will most likely show some sign of defect. Defective diodes will usually emit an electrical burning smell, signifying its defectiveness. Also, it may have split in two, or it may exhibit a burned crack, or possibly even a blistered spot.

A shorted diode is indicated by a loud humming noise from the high voltage transformer, and no heat produced when a cook cycle is initiated. Whereas little or no heat produced in your microwave, with an absence of a humming noise is indicative of an open diode. In either case, the diode has to be replaced.

With your microwave unplugged, and your capacitor discharged, use extreme caution to remove the lead that leads to the capacitor. You can leave the ground connection attached. The side of the diode that goes to the ground is usually marked with a dot, stripe, or arrow. Set your ohmmeter to R x 10,000 or higher. Touch the positive meter probe to the anode and the negative meter probe to the cathode to measure the resistance across the diode terminals. Remember that the cathode is on the side that goes to the ground, which is often marked by a dot, stripe, or an arrow.

A normal diode, that is a non-defective diode, will read anywhere from 50,000 to 200,000 ohms. Differences in microwave make and model account for this large range in resistance readings.

Reverse the meter probes and measure resistance while touching the positive probe to the cathode and the negative probe to the anode. Reversing the probes like this should result in a reading of infinity. Unless a bleeder resistor is present. The presence of a bleeder resistor would produce a reading of the value of the resistor.

High Voltage Capacitor

A capacitor is an electrical device which stores electricity. A defective capacitor may be why your microwave is not heating but you are hearing a buzzing or humming noise. The capacitor will have to be tested to determine if this is the cause of your problem. A defective capacitor will have to be replaced before your microwave will work again. Make sure you discharge the capacitor before you test it, though.

Magnetron

A defective magnetron is the third possible cause of why your microwave is not heating, but you can hear a buzzing noise. Test your microwave's magnetron. Replace it if it is defective.

Testing a magnetron

NOTE: Before you test this component, make sure your microwave is unplugged, and that you have discharged the capacitor.

There are two tests to conduct in order to determine whether or not a magnetron has become defective. If you receive results other than what are detailed below, you will have to replace your microwave's magnetron. Each test is described for you here:

TEST 1: Locate your magnetron and label each of the wires attached to it so that you know which wires are to be replaced where. Set your ohmmeter to the lowest resistance scale. Take a resistance measurement between each of the magnetron's terminals by touching each probe to one terminal each. Reverse the probes and take a second resistance measurement. Each measurement should read less than one ohm.

TEST 2: Set your ohmmeter to its highest resistance scale. Touch one of the meter's probes to a magnetron terminal. Touch the other probe to the metal magnetron housing. Take special caution to not touch the two probes together. This could result in an inaccurate reading. This test should produce a reading of infinity - indicating an open circuit.

Read the tips on the below links on how to replace your microwave oven's diode and how to discharge the capacitor.

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088355-replace_microwave_ovens_diode

http://www.fixya.com/support/r7088317-discharge_microwave_ovens_capacitor

I hope the above is helpful.

Take care.

Feb 15, 2011 | GE JVM1850 1000 Watts Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Generic problem for all Kenmore Microwave


Loud hum is usually due to faulty hv diod, resonance capacitor, or the magnatrone feed thru capacitor , chk it with a ohm meter , one by one n replace it .. zaheer Islamabad

Dec 31, 2009 | Kenmore Microwave Ovens

2 Answers

Our Sharp microwave oven turns on, makes a loud humming noise, starts to smell like something is burning, but doesn't heat. Well, actually, we don't think it heats, we're too scared to let it run because...


Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman";} This can be caused by grease etc. inside the oven and on the wave guide which is the paper like thing in the oven. If you can remove it look for burnt areas which may can be scraped off or you may need to replace it. An appliance parts store usually has the material you can cut to fit you own.

Dec 10, 2009 | Sharp R-530ES Microwave Oven

1 Answer

Not heating and making a loud humming noise.


you have done well out of the oven . it sounds that certain components are well worn and probably no able to get parts best advice it time to buy a new one

Dec 21, 2017 | Kenmore Microwave Ovens

1 Answer

Maytag Rangehood Microwave Loud Humming


Sounds like you just fried your magnetron. Normally when they go bad, they make a very loud noise like what you described. The smell concerns me because you may have ruined the waveguide as well. If the magnetron burns through the protective painted surface of the waveguide, the waveguide is ruined. In most microwave ovens this means replacing the entire unit because the waveguide is not replaceable. Putting a new magnetron in a damaged waveguide will result in the same arcing and eventual failure. In addition to the magnetron, the following components are part of the same high voltage network: HV Transformer HV Diode HV Capacitor Magnetron Thermal Cut-Out Any one of these components could have also been damaged. I DO NOT recommend taking any voltage measurements inside the HV network. Potentials of over 4000 volts can be reached and make it very dangerous for the do-it-yourselfer. Taking resistance readings with the unit unplugged is strongly encouraged. If you decide to pursue a repair, inspect the magnetron tip and inside of the waveguide first. If the magnetron is melted and/or there are burn marks inside the waveguide, a new microwave may be a in order. This actually may be a better option than an expensive repair. I hope you find this advice helpful.

Jul 31, 2007 | Whirlpool GH4155XP Microwave Oven

Not finding what you are looking for?
Kenmore 60654 Microwave Oven Logo

284 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Kenmore Microwave Ovens Experts

William Miller
William Miller

Level 3 Expert

9098 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17130 Answers

Chuck

Level 2 Expert

228 Answers

Are you a Kenmore Microwave Oven Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...