Question about Hasselblad 110mm f/2 FE Zeiss Plannar Lens

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My Zeiss 110 Planar lens will not stop down to the taking aperture . The depth of field preview switch works but the lens remains wide open at f2.even when taking a picture.

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F2 is wide open, unless you also have an F1.8 stop. F2 is open wide and F16-F22 are almost closed. The smaller the number, the wider the opening.

Posted on Nov 20, 2009

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Pictures not real sharp


Joyce, if your taking the pictures in a low light situation like in the house, the lens opens up wide which gives a shalow depth of field. To get a deaper depth of field use flash or take them outside, the lense will stop down to a smaller aperture and more will be in focus.

Nov 19, 2012 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS7 Digital Camera

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Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the...


Depth of field is the characteristic of how much of, or how deeply, the photograph is in focus. If the main subject is in focus but the foreground and background are blurred, the photo is said to have a shallow depth of field. if most of the photo is in focus, including the foreground and background, the photo is said to have a wide depth of field.

Depth of field is controlled by the aperture setting:

- A wide aperture setting (indicated by a low f-stop number) will provide shallow depth of field, resulting in the main subject being in focus and the foreground and background being blurry. This setting is particularly useful when taking portraits or when using a macro lens.

- A narrow aperture setting (indicated by a higher f-stop number) will provide wider depth of field, resulting in the entire photo being in focus. This setting is particularly useful when taking landscape or wide-angle photographs.

The photographs below are examples of how the same subject will photograph using different aperture settings. Note that as the aperture closes, which will allow less light to reach the image sensor, the shutter speed gets faster to produce the appropriate exposure.



shajanrs.jpg

shajanrs_0.jpg

shajanrs_1.jpg

shajanrs_2.jpg

I think you have got a general idea about depth filed. If you have further questions, you can ask me directly. http://www.fixya.com/users/shajanrs






depth of field - what is depth field - how depth field affects picture - how to adjust depth field - DEPTH FIELD - depthfield - DEPTHFIELD

on Jan 08, 2011 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W50 Digital Camera

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I hae a Canon AE-1. Holding the camera so that one if facing the lens: at the bottom right, at the 5:00 position, up against the lens assembly, is a black switch or button or whatever you want to call...


It's normally referred to as a depth of field preview. It's used to stop down the lens to whatever aperture you've set it to, so you can preview the depth of field to see how much of your scene will be in focus at any given aperture. It's not often used, but can be important in macro and portrait photography when a shallow depth of field and critical point of focus are both necessary.

Sep 18, 2011 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Hi, I have taken over 20 rolls of film so far and haven't had a problem until now. Whenever, I go outside to take pictures (in the daylight), my pictures come out black (last 5 rolls of film) In the same...


I think the aperture is not shutting down to the opening you set it to. In an SLR, the aperture is normally fully open for viewing through the lens. When you press the button, the mirror flips up and the aperture closes to the figure you have set, then the shutter fires. If you have set a daytime aperture and the aperture sticks, you get a wide open aperture and an overexposed shot, but at night, you have set an open or almost open aperture anyway.

It is possible that the shutter is the problem, but the aperture is more likely to go wrong in my experience. It only takes a drop of oil on the blades. There ought to be a button or lever to shut the aperture down for depth of field preview which you could use to test this, or just look in the lens when the shutter fires to see if the aperture closes.

Nov 14, 2010 | Canon EOS-AE-1 35mm SLR Camera

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I dont understand the depth of feid button


Depth of field is one of the most useful creative controls on any camera.

It enables you to see how any given aperture setting will affect how much of your photographic scene will be in sharp focus. Aperture settings don't just affect how much light enters the lens, they determine how much of the scene in front of and behind the subject which you've focussed on will also be in focus. The distance between the nearest object in sharp focus and the most distant is called the depth of field.
Wide open apertures (i.e. lowest numbers) give you the shallowest depth of field and vice-versa.

Modern cameras always show the image in the viewfinder or LCD using the lens aperture wide open, regardless of what you've actually set: this allows maximum light into the lens to allow you to clearly see the scene and the lens only close down to the correct aperture at the moment that you press the shutter. The depth of field button (more correctly called the depth of field preview button) enables you to close down the aperture to what it's actually been set to so that you can see exactly what is in sharp focus; when you press it the scene will darken as there will be less light entering the camera, but if you look at a foreground or background subject which is out of focus before you press the button you'll notice that it becomes sharper when you activate the preview. The button will not have any effect at all if you have the lens set to it's maximum (lowest number) aperture, as the aperture that you're viewing the scene at is identical to the one you're taking the photo at.

Understanding depth of field and how you can manipulate it is vital to taking stunning photos:-

Say you want to take a photo of a bee on a flower: if you leave the camera set to auto, or select a medium to small aperture then the photo will show the bee, the flower, and everything in front and behind making a confusing and busy shot. If you select a wide open aperture then the bee will be in sharp focus (if you're really close, maybe only it's head), the flower, or parts of it will be in sharp focus, and the foreground and background will blur out making the bee and the flower the most important compositional elements in your shot.

Alternatively, you may be in a situation where you need to lift your camera quickly and take a shot without disturbing the subject. You don't know exactly how far away your subject will be, but you know it will be between, say, five feet and twenty feet. If you use your camera as normal, you'll see the shot, lift the camera to your eye, wait for focus (if using an autofocus camera, it might not even focus on what you intend). By the time the shutter has activated the moment has passed or the subject has seen or heard you and gone. Using depth of field you can manually prefocus to a point about a third of the way into your d.o.f. (in this case, ten feet) and select the correct aperture to give you a fifteen foot d.o.f. The setting varies with the lens, but you'll almost always get away with f8). When you see the right shot you just lift the camera and fire without worrying about focus and if you've done so correctly your subject will be sharply focussed. Of course, you could set the lens to minimum aperture, but this can result in the shutter speed being too low for the light conditions and causing unsharpness due to movement of the subject or your camera.

The technique is known as hyperfocal focussing and it explains why some lenses have various markings on them in various colours with aperture numbers next to them, they're a simple depth of field calculator for any given aperture setting. I'd provide a link but it's better if you search yourself as some sites go into what may be far too much detail about the subject.

Hope this has helped you, all that I ask in return is that you take a moment to rate my answer. If there's anything which you want me to clarify further then add a comment to my answer and I'll return as soon as I can to assist you some more.

Jan 30, 2010 | Nikon N80 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Nikon FA depth of field preview lever sticky


The small lever on the inside of the mirror box is what controls the aperture. If the lever on the outside is sticking, it would only hold the lever on the inside down so you would be stopped down all the time. You can try a small amount of lighter fluid at the base of the outside lever and work it back and forth to see if it would free up.

Jan 19, 2010 | Nikon FA 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

M42 adaptor


Quite right too. When the M42 adaptor is fitted there is absolutely no exchange of information between the lens and the body: M42 lenses pre-date all of those later developments. Your camera will also be unable to stop down the lens automatically when taking the picture, most M42 lenses don't even stop down automatically when connected to an M42 body.

You need to do things the old-fashioned way. Your camera needs to be set to meter manually, shutter priority mode may also be used. In manual mode you focus the lens as normal with the aperture ring set to the lowest aperture number (i.e.aperture is wide open).
You then make sure that the lens in in manual mode as well and stop down to whatever you want, if the image remains bright enough then you can adjust the precise focus using the hyperfocal principle if you like which takes advantage of the increased depth of field of a stopped down lens.
In manual mode, you then tell the camera what aperture you have set (read it from the lens barrel) and set the shutter speed using the camera's light meter to guide you. If using shutter priority mode then the camera will choose the shutter speed for you.
Check everything is set as you intend and press the shutter.

It all sounds long winded but is exactly how many of the world's greatest photos were taken and soon becomes second nature. You also learn far more about the relationship between aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings and will be able to talk about reciprocity like you know about it!

Jun 26, 2009 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D / Dynax 7D...

1 Answer

Tamron 90mm 2.5 adaptall man focus lens


You probably have to set the aperture manually on the lens, because it might not have CPU contacts. I think changing the aperture on the camera will probably have no effect, so just try twisting the aperture ring to wide open.

You usually have to set the aperture at the minimum setting (highest number) so that if the camera is choosing the aperture, it can stop down to the required value.

No good having it set at f2.8 if the shot needs f11.

If the lens is very old, it might have a manual iris that you have to set yourself on the lens. The lenses that stop down automatically will have a tiny peg on the mount that a suitable camera can operate. Gentle pushing of this peg while looking through the lens will tell if it is stopping down - set it wide open first.

If you have a depth of field preview button, this will also have the same effect with the lens on the camera if the body matches up with the lens.

Jan 17, 2009 | Tamron Macro 90mm f/2.5 Manual Focus...

2 Answers

Canon T90 eee


I don't have a T90 or an FD lens, so can only guess what this means. This is quoted from the T90 manual:

"When you use the stopped-down AE mode with the FD lens, do not push in the stop-down lever with the lens set at the "A" mark. If you do, "E" marks indicating an error will appear to warn you of incorrect operation (EEEE EE in the viewfinder and EEE on the display panel), and the shutter is locked.

In this case, either push in the stop-down lever again to clear the stopped-down AE or remove the lens from the "A" mark. The error display will then disappear."

The stop-down lever is on the lower left front of the camera, and is what is usually now called the "depth of field preview" button. The "A" mark is the setting on the lens for fully automatic aperture control.

Jan 02, 2009 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Depth of field preeview button


That's a really good question, Denise.

One problem is that a D70 viewfinder is dark to start with. I don't notice this when shooting with mine unless I pick up my old Pentax Spotmatic for some reason, and then I am reminded how bright an optical viewfinder can be. So, in many cases, you will find the DOF preview useless not because it isn't working, but because the scene is simply too dark for you to see the differences.

Second thing is to notice what DOF you are seeing when you DON'T have DOF pressed. I think all modern cameras give you viewfinder at wide open aperatures -- so until you press DOF, you are seeing the focal depth produced by your lens' widest aperature. So don't expect to see much difference if you hit DOF with the aperture set at 2.2 on a F/1.8 lens -- you're comparing very similar lens apertures.

In fact, I notice that with my F/1.8 lens, I don't see any differences in where my focus lies until I have closed the lens down to maybe F/8. But beyond there, I can clearly see that more and more of the scene is in focus.

If you're still curious but not seeing it, try some test shots. Change the aperture and using shutter time to compensate, and see if your photo DOF matches the preview.

Hope that makes sense!
-- eastpole

Nov 28, 2007 | Nikon D70 Digital Camera with 18-70mm Lens

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