Question about Toshiba MK8025GAS 80 GB ATA-100 Hard Drive

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Say's it needs to initialize and comes up with eisa.

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  • aaronmburg Nov 19, 2009

    I tried what you said but it's like it's not turning on. I'm not hearing anything from the drive. The computer management in Vista see's it but it won't initialize. Hope I don't have to send it out. It looks like I probably will.

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The EISA partition is a partition that a computer manufacturer places on the disc to assist in recovery of that maker's files. It is not necessary to have this partition if you do not intend to perfrom a factory recovery. I will include a guide below to assist you in a deletion of that partition. To initialize a disc, it can be done ways, boot the computer and it will advise you the disc has not been initialized and will initiate a wizard to assist. I attach the hard drive to another computer using an EIDE/SATA to USB adapter, it will be recognized as an external drive but will not give it a drive letter because it is not initialized. You have to go to the control panel > administrator tools > computer management > disc management. Look in the right lower pane and it will show the drive with a grayed out box to the left, it may label the drive as drive 03 or 04 etc. Right click on the drive number and choose initiate. The computer will initiate the drive and give it a letter. It will also ask you if you want to initiate the drive as a bootable drive, choose yes. Below is the guide to delete that EISA partition so you can use the drive in any laptop you see fit.

EISA Partition Delete

1. Open a command prompt as administrator.
2. Run Diskpart application by typing Diskpart in the command prompt.
3. In the “Diskpart” prompt, enter rescan command and press Enter key to re-scan all partitions, volumes and drives available.
4. Then type in list disk and press Enter key to show all hard disk drive available.
5. Select the disk that contains the partition you want to remove. Normally, with just 1 hard disk, it will be disk 0. So the command will be:
select disk 0
Finish by Enter key.
6. Type list partition and press Enter key to show all available and created partition in the disk selected.
7. Select the partition that wanted to be deleted by using the following command, followed by Enter key:
select partition x
where x is the number of the EISA based recovery partition to be removed and unlocked its space. Be careful with the number of this partition, as wrong number may get data wipes off.
8. Finally, type in delete partition override and press Enter key.
Once the partition has been deleted, exit from Diskpart, and now users can use the much familiar and much easier Disk Management tool in Windows (diskmgmt.msc) to manipulate the freed unallocated partition. Users can create a new volume (partition) with this space, or simply merge it to existing partition by extending the size of the existing partition.

Posted on Nov 19, 2009

  • Chip
    Chip Nov 19, 2009

    If you right clicked in the right spot and it refuses or states that it cannot initialize the disc, then I would suspect the drive has died. I just had one do the same thing....Not much you can do, if you need the data bad enough, there is data recovery, that can be expensive to the tune of 1500 bucks in some cases. Depends on the capacity of the drive and how much data needs to be recovered. Good luck.

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I would be interested to know if you can still restore your system now using the data that you transferred to a different partition?


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