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My son dropped coins between my piano keys and we can't get them out. we tried removing the screws from the bottom of the keyboard panel but something still seems to be holding the keyboard panel in place. What else do we need to do other than removing the screws? I own the Yamaha Portable Grand DGX 500.

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6ya6ya
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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: No sound when piano keys are pushed on my Yamaha dgx-620

I'm sorry but it sounds like you will have to have it repaired professionally.

Posted on Apr 28, 2009

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Hugh fulton
  • 62 Answers

SOURCE: Kurzweil piano keys are clicking seems to be worn out.

I don't see you doing any damage by having a look but I would get a piano tuner or repairer in to investigate the problem expertly - no slight on you. But if your Church congregation depend on it it's well worth the money.
Good Luck

Posted on Sep 13, 2009

  • 5603 Answers

SOURCE: certain keys do not make a sound..

The wire from pin 1 or 7 of CN1 on the GHL88L (left end) circuit board is open where it goes to the middle circuit board. This could be a bad cable, improperly seated cable connector, or a crack in the circuit board(s) connecting to these wires. These are the common matrix wires associated with only the C# and G keys for the left 1/3 of the keys. If more than 1/3 is dead, then the problem is likely on the middle board GHL88M that connects to the mating cable to the CN1 connector.

There are two wires dedicated to the keys for the two contacts that are used to measure velocity of the key strokes. There is a mechanical position between closing the contacts and the time is measured by the processor as velocity.

If you are the least bit worried about working on electronics you best have a service person do the repair. The keyboard has to be lifted out after removing the top and disconnecting other cables.

Posted on May 03, 2010

rommelalilin
  • 2178 Answers

SOURCE: Can I connect a Yamaha DGX-500 piano to an

yes - use two RCA cables from the left and right audio output and connect it to the aux audio RCA inputs of an amplifier or receiver.

Posted on Dec 06, 2010

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2 Answers

How do I fix a stuck piano key on a upright home piano


You'll likely need to try removing the keys, so you can see if something is stuck underneath it. That would be my first move.
In order to do this, follow these steps:

The front panel and the keyboard fall are designed to be easily removed for tuning purposes anyway.

To check it out....The front panel likely has a little clip either side near the top on the inside. Just undo these clips and lift the panel out. The keyboard fall should then be easy to lift out too.

There may be a long wooden rail which you need to take out also. Once inside, the keys themselves can be carefully lifted off the central spikes on which they sit.

Remember how you did this so you can get them back in again.

Since your piano is so old and worn, Often times, the wooden rail in front of the keys (just above your knees when you are playing) bows inwards a little due to age and temperature/humidity fluctuations. This then causes the little white front bit of the keys to jam against the wood and you have to physically lift the keys back up to return them.
If this is the problem you will need to take out the keys and shave some wood off the inside of this rail to allow the keys to move up and down freely again.
Or sometimes you may find you have a small object caught under a key or two. Much simpler to remove and free up your keys, if this is your problem..
Hopefully, this is all you will find wrong with your piano.
If all else fails...
I wouldn't attempt to tune your piano by yourself. I would seek out an experienced piano tuner for that.
But it is worth attempting to repair it first before you go that far.
Good luck !!

Feb 26, 2015 | Music

1 Answer

How do I replace one key?


You will need to gain access to the keybed, remove screw from back of keybed the fix it to the base of the keyboard. Slide the keybed back making a gap of about 2cm at the front of the keybed.

Look at the back of the key towards where it pivots and you will see a small arrow, push something like a credit card between the keys at this point and the key will pop up, you can then slide forward releasing the key.

If you need more info please ask.

Jun 07, 2014 | Yamaha YDP-161 Arius Graded Hammer Piano...

1 Answer

How to remove keyboard suzuki piano hg425e


It's very difficult. I advise reading through these instructions all the way to decide if you really want to engage.

First, unplug the piano. Then take the large body lid off the piano. Slide out the 2 pins on which the lid pivots on the left side.

As you start the unscrewing phase, I advise carefully labelling the origin of all the screws (in small dishes perhaps) or it will be very tough to put back together.

Unscrew the ~8 screws holding the fabric cover over the speakers. Two of these screws are triangular head so you'll need a special screw driver. Lift the fabric covered wood inner cover carefully - there's a fabric tab on the left side to give you a start. There are two speakers attached to the underside of the inner cover. Unplug two speaker wires from each speaker by pulling the connection points out and away from the speaker.

Next, take off the keyboard lid. There are 2 screws holding it on each side to the main frame box. Lift it straight up since it rests on 2 wooden pivots.

Release the display panel. There is 1 screw on each side into the frame, and 4 sets of 2 screws along its back edge. Once freed, lift it back carefully and out of the way - there are a lot of wires attached to the display panel and it's best if you don't tamper with any of them. The play in the wires should let you rest it on the main piano box.

Next remove the end blocks beside the keys. There are two screws holding each end block to the floor of the cabinet. Once unscrewed, slide the blocks toward the back about 1 cm to free and lift out of place. The left block has the power wires attached so handle it gently and fold back onto the sound box to get it out of the way without disconnecting it.

Next you must remove the front panel and key box. The front panel faces outward just below (and in front of) the keys. The key box contains the keys, the weighted levers beneath the keys, the contact points and the key electronics - all contained or sitting on a metal box.

There are several steps to remove it. The easiest way may be to leave the front panel attached to the key box - and separate them later.

First, unscrew the ~8 screws holding the back of the key box to the floor of the cabinet. (This will also detach the ground wire.) Then trace the wire ribbon emerging from the back of the key box and detach it from the motherboard - you may need to snip a plastic zip tying the ribbon to other ribbons.

Underneath the piano detach the input jack box on the left side (6 screws) and detach the disk player box on the right side (6 screws). Unfortunately these two boxes block some of the screws you must access.

Next, remove the two rows of ~8 screws along the front underside edge. The first row is ~2 cm from the front edge and the second row is about 5 cm from the edge.

You can now remove the key box and front panel. They should slide forward out of the front of the piano.

You can detach the front panel from the key box by releasing two screws on each side.

Set the key box on a work table. To free the keys, remove one of the plates holding the keys from the back. Each plate holds about 8 keys and has 4 screws to remove. The ones on the ends have less. Next, pry up the black plastic strip anchoring the backs of the keys.

Individual keys may now be removed. To remove a key push it straight backwards from it's normal resting position about 3-4 mm. With a little wiggling, the back of the key should pop out of its restraint. With the back released, slide the front forward and lift it off the key box. A key can also be removed by lifting the front clear of the lip holding it, and then sliding the back portion backwards 3-4 mm - although this requires a lot of wiggling. Use the first method if possible. It may be frustrating to get the first one, but it is possible.

You should be able to see the metal cantilevers beneath the keys. These are what stick. The cantilevers pivot on plastic bushings around two metal axles - the ends of which are visible from the end of the key box (once a small plastic cover on each end is removed - one screw each).

The bushings become worn or swell and stick to each other and their surroundings. You can try blasting them out with air and then adding a few drops of lubricating oil.

When this did not work for me, I toyed briefly with removing the two metal axles, This would allow cleaning all the plastic bushings individually by hand and replacing any defective ones. But there would still be little guarantee that sticking would not reoccur at any time, especially since the instrument is now old/compromised. Furthermore, removing the axles would necessitate taking off all the keys, and all the tiny screws along the top of the plates, and removing all the electronics from the key box.

Removing the axles would mean that to re-insert them each key would have to be threaded, (from the edges in). An enormous task.

I decided to call it quits. I'm now looking for either a new key box I can purchase intact, or another piano, not a Suzuki!!

Feb 03, 2013 | Music

2 Answers

1 key does not spring back when it is pressed and 1 key has a bit of resistance when pushed


The elektrotanya website link proposed in the other solution here did not work for me. So with a similar sticky keys problem on my YDP-113 yamaha digital piano, i just started taking it apart.

I found that the problem was that the sticking keys actually had small cracks at the hinge end. See attached photo for a picture of the hinge end of the key. The cracks are very small and hard to see, but if this is your problem, you will see it in a good light. Having the key apart will also allow you to clean the sides well in case there has been a bubble gum attack or similar problem.

After learning that replacement keys are extremely expensive (like $15 per key...) I decided to move the bad keys to the highest and lowest notes on the keyboard (88 key keyboard so there is some seldom used territory). The center several octaves are now free of sticky keys and this is good enough for now.

The procedure on my YDP-113 was:
1. Remove black screws from back panel of unit to allow top to slide forward and then lift off. Set aside.
2. Roll the roll top all the way closed and then simply lift up to remove. Set aside.
3. Remove the six screws which attach the roll top gear rail (3 screws on each side panel). Set aside the gear rails.
4. Remove 2 screws in the key top bracket, and 1 screw from each end of the key top. "Key top" is my name for the small strip which lies along the top of the keys. If you have an official or better name, please share.
5. Remove the 10 or so large screws and two small screws which hold the keyboard panel down in the unit.The keyboard should now be able to slide a few millimeters toward the back of the unit.
6. Remove 1 screw to take out the power switch panel. The front of it hooks in with a tab, so slide it back and then it will lift out.
7. Careful now. I felt this was the one operation where I had an opportunity to ruin the unit if I would have fumbled: Lift the keyboard up slightly and rest its front 'legs' on the front edge of the case. Careful of small wires to not rip them. Careful of the circuit boards that are underneath the keyboard frame. jeff20112011.jpgThe objective here is to allow the keys to come out toward you so that they can be removed and replaced or swapped. You can kind of see in the cracked key end photo, how the keyboard is up and partially out of the unit.
8. You now can do the actual swapping. To remove a key, pry up very gently in back of the key with a small screwdriver. jeff20112011_0.jpgIt will pop up. Then gently work the key around to free it from the return spring without bending that spring. Replace with a new key or swap will a good working key in a little used position. Note that B and E are interchangeable, also C and F. Some other keys also look like they could interchange though I didn't personally try it.
9. Reassemble in reverse order of disassembly.

Apr 06, 2011 | Yamaha YDP223 Digital Piano

1 Answer

I read the solution for removing a key on a yamaha p-80 electronic piano...and is a big help...but was wondering if opening the piano is difficult....i have a bad white key...i live in mexico with no help...


There are a myriad of screws to remove around the edges and maybe a few near the middle of the bottom of the unit. When lifting the top off, be extremely careful of the cables between the top and bottom... have a large work area, padded, and have a helper to hold stuff when lifting top off. Do NOT force anything... feel if something is still connected and preventing the top from comming off. The keys should stay with the base of the unit.

Aug 22, 2010 | Yamaha Music

1 Answer

How do I remove the keys from a Roland KR 4700 piano? We can't figure it out. Please help! I can't afford to get a repairman. I need to replace the contact strip. It's happened before.


If these are semi weighted keys here is a cut and paste from a manual:
19. Disassembling the Keyboard Assembly
* After inserting a round stick (Rod: TX000670)
between the frame and the keys, remove the
circuit boards. (Fig. 23)
19-1 GHD EBUS L, MK SUB Circuit Board
(Time required: about 12 minutes)
Remove the seven (7) screws marked [260A]. The
GHD EBUS L and MK SUB circuit boards can then
be removed. (Fig. 24, Photo 5)
19-2 GHD M Circuit Board
(Time required: about 12 minutes)
Remove the five (5) screws marked [260B] and the
screw marked [262]. The GHD M circuit board can
then be removed. (Fig. 24)
19-3 GHD H Circuit Board
(Time required: about 12 minutes)
Remove the four (4) screws marked [260C] and the
screw marked [262]. The GHD H circuit board can
then be removed. (Fig. 24)
* Keys can be removed without removing the
circuit boards.
* After removing the GHD EBUS L, GHD M and
GHD H circuit boards, and the rubber contacts
can then be removed.
19-4 Rubber contact
Remove the GHD circuit board for the involved key.
The rubber contacts can then be removed.

The rod is inserted above the weighted hammer and the bottom of the keys from one end. It appears to be about 1/4 inch diameter dowel and will run the full length of the keyboard. You might use 3 foot ones from each end.

Screws are removed and the boards removed without taking the individual keys out.

Mar 17, 2010 | Yamaha NP 30 76 Key Lightweight Digital...

2 Answers

Roland hp550g digital piano has a couple of dropped keys


Power off the unit. Disconnect all cables that plug into the speaker base if you have one - It may be wise to document the individual wires to make their reinstallation easier. Remove the unit from the speaker stand and lay it on the floor on something like an old towel - you may get some dark colored grease on the rug. Remove the screws only for the bottom rear, not the front - you don't need to remove them. Do this by gently turning the unit upside down. Only remove the screws from the sides/rear bottom, and note which screw types you removed from where. Once all bottom rear screws are removed gently return the unit right side up. now pivot the top rear cover - the sides of the cover are attached to the rear - pivot it toward the back. No need to remove the ribbon cables - just let the top lay there or prop it up with something if the ribbon cables don't have enough slack for the top cover to lay flat on its back. You should now be looking at all of the keys uncovered. notice the rear of each key is where it hinges. You'll notice the grease at the hinge point. The keys are thin plastic so you must take care not to damage them. The way to remove a key is to spread the ears at the hinge point of the key you want to remove. I use a screwdriver sharpened to a point, but a large pair of needle nose pliers work good too. You insert the tapered point of the tool between the ears gently to spread them far enough to just clear the pins. Once they are spread wide enough you'll feel them disengage. Each key also has two hooks located side by side towards the front of the key on the bottom side - they are not visable until the hinge is released, but you must realise they are there or you'll either snap the key back onto the hinge or not be able to pull the key out once you've got it off the hinge. Pivot the key towards you to remove it. What you now have in your hand is not the defective part. You have the top that is touched when playing the keyboard. The defective part is still setting in the mechanism. What's actually happened is the keys are made of very thin plastic where they are glued around the weight and this plastic breaks leaving the weighted end down there somewhere. Examine where the key top came from and how it works. The key top is the part you took off of the hinge. You can see how the keys on each side work and you'll also see what is missing from the mechanism for the key you're working on. To make things easier I always remove one additional key top on each side of a key that I repair to make access easier. Just place the other keys you remove right behind the key area in the order you took them off so it'll be obvious how they go back on. Now the broken weighted mechanism you can lift right out. Actually you can lift it out easier with the weighted end broken off, but once you glue it back together you can still get it in there without to much trouble. You only need to remove the damaged weighted mechanism for the key you're repairing. I remove the key tops on each side of the damaged key for visability only. Take your pair of needle nose pliers and pick out the broken end. Now fit it onto the end of the weighted mechanism in preparation for glueing - just so you can see how it's going to go on there. I use a high quality modeling super glue. Before I came across this glue I used JB Weld, but it takes a few hours to dry. The high quality super glue allows you to put everything back together immediately. Installation is reverse of removal: Snake the weighted mechanism back in once you've repaired it - you can always examine those on each side if you get confused. Hook the key top front first then smoothly snap in place the hinge ears over the pins. Make sure to check the movement of the repaired key, and check also to see if anymore keys are setting lower as they may be in process of breaking off. Once all keys are repaired, carefull lower the top rear cover onto the key assembly. While holding the cover onto the key assembly/base, gently turn the unit over onto its back and reinstall the screws. Should be all washer headed screws - do not over tighten. Check the keys again. Set the keyboard onto its base (if it came with one) and you're done. A little practice and it'll take you less than a half hour to fix the key and get it back together

Feb 28, 2010 | Roland Music

1 Answer

I have a CDP-100 and need disassembly instructions for access to internal keyboard assembly. Unit was dropped while unloading from car. Now some keys are akimbo and won't play as though they are off their...


I just fixed my CDP 100 which had a similar problem - dropped and two keys not working up one end.
1. Lay keyboard upside down on soft surface. Under keyboard is plastic cover held on by 17 screws. Remove all these and lift cover away. The metal key ends are all revealed.
2. Locate the disloged keys. Carefully press them back into position - they will "click" into place. Make sure the corresponding key on the keyboard isn't stuck in an "up" position - you may have to remove the metal key part and replace it again while making sure the key is correctly seated.
3. Replace cover and screws.

Feb 22, 2010 | Casio Music

1 Answer

I need a service manual for Roland FP8 piano, or..


Did you ever get hold of an FP-8 service manual? The weight replacement is relatively simple: The case opens by removal of eight screws, four at each end on the underside. The top then hinges up. Keyboard assembly is removed by first unplugging the two white ribbon connectors at the center, then removing the screws at the front edge (underneath) and the screws (gold) at the back of the assembly (accessible from the top). Keys pop out by spreading the two "wings" at the pivot point, and then the weights (Roland calls them "hammers") lift out. Roland will sell you new ones, but I have no idea whether the replacements are any better than the originals. I've done two of these pianos so far, and have a third waiting to be worked on. I do have a service manual, but I think I downloaded it freebee somewhere.
The other failure mode on this piano is the electolytic coupling caps on the output board - I've replaced all of them on both pianos - don't remember the value offhand.
Paul Prestopino presto11@verizon.net

Sep 21, 2009 | Music

1 Answer

Kurzweil piano keys are clicking seems to be worn out.


I don't see you doing any damage by having a look but I would get a piano tuner or repairer in to investigate the problem expertly - no slight on you. But if your Church congregation depend on it it's well worth the money.
Good Luck

Sep 02, 2009 | Yamaha NP 30 76 Key Lightweight Digital...

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