Question about Telescopes

1 Answer

Sear's Refractoring telescope Parts

200 power astronomical telescope focusing parts andsun and moon filters, Thanks

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.


    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.


    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.


    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Contributor
  • 44 Answers
Re: Sear's Refractoring telescope Parts

Most of the refractors sold by Sears were made by Towa of Japan. These used the Japanese standard .965" barrel diameter eyepieces. These are hardo come by today and usually not worth the hunt. Get an 1.25" to .965" "hybird" star diagonal that will permit the use of 1.25" accessories. Orion sells this item. HTH, Geo.

Posted on Mar 02, 2008

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Focus the celestron 21043

What power eyepiece are you using? Use an intermediate power eyepiece like 20mm. This will give you a really nice view of the Moon. Too high a magnification eyepiece, will cause blur views.

Jan 04, 2015 | Celestron PowerSeeker 60 EQ Astronomical...

1 Answer

Jessops 600-50 Junior Astronomical Telescope instructions

try not looking so closely into the eye piece. back off a few inches so the moon is completely in view.

Jan 11, 2012 | Telescopes

1 Answer

Cannot sed anything in my brand new telescope. I have a full moon in the cross hairs of the viewfinder, but the moon is faint in the scope.

New telescope users are taken by surprise at the difficulty of just pointing the telescope in the right direction to see anything. The field of view is quite limited, especially if you are using a high power eyepiece. The higher the power of eyepiece on a telescope, the dimmer the image, the more difficult to aim it at any chosen object, and the more difficult to focus. When the scope is not focussed, even if there are stars in the field of view, they will only be faint blurs.

It is best when you are starting out with a telescope to try it with the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the highest number) to begin with, until you become more familiar with how it works. Do NOT use the Barlow lens if one came with the scope.

The finder scope is meant to help you get the main scope lined up on the object you want to view, but it won't be any use in pointing the telescope until you adjust it to precisely line up with the main scope. Telescope manuals recommend that you do this in daylight, by pointing the scope at an object on the horizon and adjusting the finder to match (never point a telescope toward the Sun!). Once you have a tree or mountain peak in the center of the main scope's image, you can then adjust the screws around the finder scope to get the crosshairs (or red dot) centered on the same object. It is very difficult to do this job in the dark, especially as objects in the sky are constantly on the move.

You will find that there is a very wide range of movement in the focus mechanism, because different eyepieces focus at different points, but the actual focus range for any eyepiece will be a small part of the overall range afforded by the focusing mount. It is much easier to familiarise yourself with this in daylight.

At this point you will learn that astronomical telescopes usually show an upside down image. There is a good reason for this- erecting the image needs more bits of glass in the light path, which reduces the amount of light and increases aberrations. Even if this is only slight, astronomers prefer to avoid it, and they don't really care which way up the Moon or Jupiter appear. It is possible to fit an erecting prism or eyepiece to most astronomical telescopes, and some of them come with one, but one wouldn't bother to do this with the small finder scope.

Once you have done the above, you can try the scope at night, on an easy to find bright object like the Moon. Looking at random stars will probably be disappointing, as they don't look different under magnification. You will have to find planets, star clusters or nebula to see anything interesting. You will also find the the object you are looking at swims out of the viewing field, and you must continually move the scope to follow it. This will be more pronounced at higher magnifications. Again, use the least powerful eyepiece. Small scopes are often advertised as having unrealistic powers (300, 500) which can never be practically achieved. You just get dim blurs.

There is an excellent website for beginner telescope users at THIS LINK

Jan 19, 2011 | Celestron PowerSeeker 114 EQ Telescope

1 Answer

Polaris by meade all set up but cant see anything but a white light.

Sounds like it is severely unfocussed. Finding the focus point on an astronomical telescope is often difficult until you have had experience with it, as the range of adjustment is very long to accommodate eyepieces of different focal lengths.

I suggest that you try the telescope first in daylight (NOT pointed at or near the Sun), using the least powerful eyepiece (the one with the largest number). Try it on objects on the horizon, remembering that they will appear upside down. This is a good time to get the accessory viewfinder scope lined up with the main scope, too. When you have become familiar with the low power eyepiece, try a higher power, which will focus at a different point (and be harder to find objects with). Then try it out at night, on a bright easily found object like the moon.

Nov 30, 2010 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

1 Answer

I can't see anything out of the large scope

Use the 20mm to view an object (building, tree etc.) far away during the daytime. Align the finderscope to the object.
To view the moon, leave the scope out to equalize the temperature for at least 1/2 hour. Use the 20mm and no barlow. Point the scope towards the moon by sighting along the barrel of the scope, then use the finder to zero in on the moon. You may then switch to the 4mm eyepiece. for a more magnified view of the moon. You will have to keep moving the telescope because of the earth's rotation. The higher the magnification, the more you will have to adjust the scope. Because of the cheap finderscope, finding the planets will be difficult. Best to always sight down the length of the scope to get you close. The planets will be small and indistinct.
This is not a astronomical telescope! May be used for views of the moon but the cheap mount is not suitable for other planets. Max power would be 225x NOT 420x as advertised. The erecting prism is for terrestrial use only.
Nothing discourages an amateur astronomer more than a toy store telescope. My advise would be to use this scope for nature watching and go buy a good telescope (Meade, Celestron, Orion etc.). Even Those 60mm refractors are superior to this! A descent scope would cost a minimum of $200

Nov 03, 2010 | Bushnell Deep Space 78-9512 (120 x 60mm)...

1 Answer

Repacment parts, Bauseh & Lomb Professional series telescope

Here is a link to their repair and customer service web site:

Jun 02, 2010 | Bausch and Lomb Professional 200 (200 x...

1 Answer

We have a 675 power/6mm astronomical refractor telescope and we can't seem to get it to work. there are no manuals with it either.

Forget about the 675 power. You will never get that much magnification.

Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the telescope. Take the scope outside duringg the day and practice focusing on a distant object. DO NOT use the 2x barlow if you have one.

The moon should be your first night time target.

Oct 26, 2009 | Simmons Outdoor Telescopes

2 Answers

Trying to identify older tasco telescope and put it together

There are only two types of telescopes --- REFRACTORS, and REFLECTORS-

The refractor has a lens on the front of the tube and you insert different eyepieces in the back-- the larger the number written on the eyepiece the LOWER the magnification-- (DO NOT USE THE 2x or 3x barlow which you may have!-- this creates too much power for this small telescope!-- put it away and never use it!)

A reflector has a main mirror on the bottom of the tube, and a small secondary mirror under the eyepiece hole (focuser end) - front end-- put the lowest power eyepiece into the focuser.

Now with either type telescope go out side during the day and practice focusing on a distant object-- turn the knob SLOWLY. At night the moon should be the first target you try.

If you received what appears to be a smaller telescope -- that is the finder scope-- attach it to the top of the tube on the main telescope. Again during the day line up the small finder scope with the main scope-- look at a distant telephone pole (the very top-- and center this in the main telescope. Without moving the main scope use the finder scopes "screws" to adjust the cross hairs so they are pointing exactly where the main scope is pointed. Now you can use the small finder scope to point the telescope in the exact direction--

The moon should be your first night time target.

Good luck--

Mar 17, 2009 | Tasco Astronomical 302675 Telescope

1 Answer

How use a telescope celestron 21041

The power seeker 60's are hard to use a high power due to the 60mm objective. try starting out with a 25mm eyepiece on the moon or some think bright and work from there.

Dec 03, 2008 | Celestron PowerSeeker 60 Astronomical...

Not finding what you are looking for?
Telescopes Logo

Related Topics:

464 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Telescopes Experts

Joe Lalumia aka...
Joe Lalumia aka...

Level 3 Expert

3185 Answers

Geoffrey White
Geoffrey White

Level 3 Expert

3961 Answers

kenneth njonjo

Level 3 Expert

1575 Answers

Are you a Telescope Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides