Question about Sony Alpha A200W 10.2MP Digital SLR Camera Kit Digital Camera with Super SteadyShot Image Stabilization with 18-70m... Lens

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How do I stop shadows on my subjects faces when photographing outside

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Force the flash to go off, this will get rid of any shadows on people. If it's bright outside, the flash won't fire automatically, you need to force it.

Posted on Nov 16, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How do I take a high key photo outdoors? What is typical settings? I have a Canon EOS 1200d with a 35-55mm lens


A high key photograph typically has a light-coloured subject exposed to just retain details in the highlights, with very little shadow detail.
Impossible to give technical details, as it depends on the subject and the ambient lighting - best advice I can give is to try various settings until you get a result that suits you, then check the exposure details in the EXIF file.

May 31, 2016 | Canon Eos Cameras

1 Answer

Portrait Professional Studio 10


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Jul 10, 2015 | Cameras

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Using the flash puts a shadow on the right side of the face. Seems to show only on faces and only when the flash is used.


Nothing "wrong" with that. All cameras do exactly the same.
The stronger the flash, the more pronounced the shadow is.

One way to reduce it is to step back and zoom on the subject, or if your camera has such feature, reduce the intensity of the flash.

If you need some tips, please Google: How to avoid flash shadows?
Apparently many people have this same problem.

Jun 24, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

How can i reduce my reduce my shadows


There are several things that you might try to reduce shadows. Be aware that you're not going to eliminate shadows completely, unless you're photographing a flat wall.

1. Move the flash off camera. This will require either a sync cord or some method of triggering it wirelessly.

2. If your primary concern is shadows on a wall, try to move your subject further from the wall. Obviously, the size of the room and the furniture may not allow this.

3. Diffuse the flash to soften it. You can buy a dedicated diffuser, or you can try draping a single thickness of a white napkin or tissue over your flash unit.

4. Use multiple light sources. If you want to use multiple flash units, again you'll need sync cords or a wireless system.

Hope this helps.

Dec 20, 2009 | Quantaray QDC-900WA TTL Flash

4 Answers

Photography techniques


I suggest you join a good online photography course to get basic knowledge. it is helpful in your photography.
assignment 1-lxpsgkj4qldi1whs44e4wdvs-4-0.jpg

Nov 29, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Direct Sunlight...


Try adding a bit of fill in flash. It's difficult in direct sun, as if the sun is behind YOU the subject may be squinting. If the sun is behind the subject you will need lots of flash to compensate for the face being in shadow.

If you are posing the shot, put the sun behind and to one side of the sitter and use a good reflector to bounce light back toward them with the reflector at eye level. The reflector does not have to be a special bought item. A sheet of really thick whit card, taped to a tripod will do just as well.

If you are taking pics on the go and can't lug equipment around with you, meter on the face, use a little fill and bracket a stop either side to make sure.

Jul 07, 2008 | Nikon Cameras

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Help setting shutter speed and adjusting a lense properly


Hey little22,
I would set this camera to auto mode to begin with. This cameras auto mode is actually an aperture priority mode which means you choose the aperture on the lens and the camera automatically chooses the correct shutter speed. For outside photography the morning hours and the evening hours will provide the best light because the light is softer and the subject will not be lit from above which usually cast unwanted shadows on your subject. If you do have to shoot during mid day I would put an external flash on your camera to fill in the shadow areas on the subject. Inside photography is often more challenging because even though the human eye can adjust to low light levels camera film is not so forgiving. You will either need to shoot with a very high ISO film, or you will need to use a flash. I would suggest using a flash since high ISO film is usually very grainy. If you can I would suggest bouncing the flash off of a white surface this should produce softer light and more pleasing portraits. I have included a link to a download of your camera manual incase you need it. If you have any other more specific questions just ask. I hope this helps!

http://ca.konicaminolta.com/support/manuals/film-cameras/film_mf_slr/index.html

Sincerely,
Allan
Go Ahead. Use Us.


Jun 21, 2008 | Minolta X-370S 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Taking outdoor pics of people when its sunny.


As cameras become more and more automatic, it is harder for thier owners to be 'photographers'. I was trained as a photographer many many years ago on large format, film cameras with no meters and digital was something for the science fiction books. I rarely put any of my digital SLRs in one of the automatic mode.
With your SD600, you have very little control that you can use to overcome this issue. but you DO have some...

First trick is to manually turn your flash on, even in bright sun when shooting outdoors, (this will do two things, turn on the flash which will provide some fill light on the faces of your subjects to reduce the range between the darkest and lightest areas on your people subjects; and it will change the length of time that the shutter stays open to compensate for the slowness of the flash. So you are puttting more light on thier faces and allowing light to pass thru the lens for a longer duration.)

Second, wear a white shirt/blouse. your subjects are in bright sunlight, but the faces are dark - tells me the sun is behind them and in front of you. Thus a white shirt will reflect light and you become a reflector of sorts (this is a short range trick only) Be mindful of the color of your shirts here, color also reflects and may cause their skin tones to become slightly 'off'.

Also try to get your subjects to step into a shady area so that there is not such a high range difference between the brightly lit areas and shadows on them, some cameras, yours included can only do so much -

Look at it this way, I can ask you to someone to swallow a grape in one bite, maybe something the size of a lemon is possible, but you cannot take an entire potatoe into your mouth at one time. In the same way, your camera can only take in a given 'range' of values (intensity) from the darkest to lightest before you exceed it's ability. anything brighter than a given level is simply blown out and anything darker than a given value simply records as black or dark with little or no detail.

This is why a lower pixel count SLR takes better pictures than a high pixel compact camera. Most folks only read the pixel count and go 'ooh ah' - because that is how cameras are marketed. (lots of points recording lower quality range vs fewer points recording higher quality range)

Find ways to stay within the range that your camera can accept. add light to the low end as in tips one and two or reduce the high end, as in tip 3)

Let me know how it works out...

Aug 02, 2007 | Canon PowerShot SD600 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the difference between wide and standard on a picture?


You will see more detail in highlights and shadows (i.e. if you are a few stops over exposed, you will still see the details of a white wedding dress. If you are a few stops under, you will see the details of the shadows of large canyons on the beach) using the wide feature. The wide mode is used to obtain a larger dynamic range with the S3. The standard mode uses the same dynamic range as the S2. If you are looking for faster write speeds, you would use the standard mode, as the wide mode takes longer to write information. Standard is also used to obtain a smaller Raw file size. Based on the scene being shot, only a photographer would know if he would need more dynamic range then usual. It depends on the highlights and shadows of the subject or scene.

Aug 29, 2005 | Fuji FinePix S3 Pro Digital Camera

1 Answer

Reduce shadow


All solid objects cast a shadow; it cannot be avoided. Certain techniques will help control or reduce the shadow by eliminating or reducing the harshness of the flash. Some of these techniques are: Elevate, eliminate or soften the flash: Make sure the flash is above the lens when you camera is turned to vertical (portrait) orientation. If the on-camera flash is higher than the subject, the lens should not "see" the shadow in most situations. Make sure the camera is higher than the subject, but not so high that you make a shadow in the other direction (under your subject's eyebrows, nose or chin, for example). If there is enough natural light, you might be able to turn the flash off, or you can add "natural" light to the scene by opening curtains, turning on room lights, and so on. In low light you can still photograph without the flash by making sure the camera does not move during the exposure. Consider using a tripod or monopod. The auto color balance feature should automatically adjust the color for the light source. Sometimes it is helpful (at least minimally) to include a white or near neutral grey item within the camera's field of view to assist the camera's color balance assessment. Mixed lighting gives mixed results. Illuminate, eliminate, or move away from the object that has the shadow cast upon it (a wall, for example). Or, use it to your advantage by angling for a better position that may bounce and diffuse the light from the on-camera flash by reflecting light off the wall. Some photographers might lay a white sheet in front of the subject to soften the light by bouncing the light off the ceiling.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

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