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Hi I would like to drain the water out of my radiators so I can change the 2 zone valve on my heating system. It is allowing water to bypass so needs replacing but i dont want to flood the house. Please could you advise how I go about this? Thanks in advance Shaun

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  • shaundempsey Nov 14, 2009

    Thanks heatman101, i cant seem to find a suitable place to attach the hose!
    Any ideas?
    Shaun

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Why not turn off both valves going to ur lowest radiator in the house then drain that one rad by disconnecting the valve from one side preferably the one with the half inch nut. when drained connect ur hose to the valve with the half inch thread using a new nut and an olive then open the valve up to drain thru hose. remember if system is tank fed u will have to shut off water supply to tank to stop the system filling. hope this helps

Posted on Nov 26, 2009

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You first need to find the fill valve on your boiler and then shut that off. Then you need to find the drain off of your boiler or heat piping and get a hose on that. If you have a drain on the piping that is lower than the zones valve that would work the best so you dont need to drain the boiler also. Run the hose to a drain which needs to be lower than your piping oor boiler. You may have to open thebleeders on the radiators to let air in for them to drain completely. This can take a long time on some systems. You may also have to manually open the zone valves to get the pipes to drain completely. You can then change your zone valves and then open the fill valve to refill your system. Make sure that you bleed all the air out of the radiators after refilling or they will not fill completely and have diminished heat output.

Posted on Nov 14, 2009

  • D. Floyd Kolb
    D. Floyd Kolb Nov 14, 2009

    If all else fails there always is a boiler drain on the bottom of your boiler somewhere. Sometimes they can be hard to find. If you cannot find anything then I would get a big garage can and cut the pipe over it, run the water into the can and then installa drain while you have the system empty. Then you will be ready for the "next time" you need to drain the system.

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