Question about Edimax ES-5800S Networking Switch

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Loss of link packets

I have had this unit for a number of years without problems.

Just switched to broadband - Connecting via switch causes multiple disconnections and reduced speed. Direct computer connection gives permanent connection and treble the speed.

Broadband supplier (BT) say this is because the 1Gb switch fussy and is missing lots of link packets and I should switch to a 10/100 switch.

Comments please

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  • 139 Answers

Auto-negotiation, or duplex mismatch problems are common between 10/100 and 1Gb devices. Make sure the driver on your computer's ethernet adapter is up-to-date. If that doesn't help, you may need to try an inexpensive D-link or Linksys 10/100 switch.

Posted on Jan 10, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Can the S2700 Switch Function as a Gateway?


The S2700 switch cannot be used as a gateway. The S2700 is a Layer 2 switch. If it is used as a gateway, it sends all packets that need to be forwarded at Layer 3 to the CPU to forward the packets through software. This causes a high CPU usage. Because CAR parameters are configured to protect the CPU, a large number of packets are dropped, affecting forwarding of service packets.

Aug 08, 2016 | Computers & Internet

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How do latency and packet loss determine network performance and what can be...


The triumvirate of network performance metrics are packet loss, latency and jitter.

Almost all network applications use TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) to get their data from point A to point B. About 85% of the overall internet's traffic is TCP, of which specific aspect is that it completely hides the packet-based nature of the network from applications. Whether an application hands a single character or a multi-megabyte file to TCP, puts the data in packets and sends it on its way over the network. The internet is a scary place for packets trying to find their way: it's not uncommon for packets to be lost and never make it across, or to arrive in a different order than they were transmitted. TCP retransmits lost packets and puts data back in the original order if needed before it hands over the data to the receiver. This way, applications don't have to worry about those eventualities.

Network latency
TCP has a number of mechanisms to get good performance in the presence of high latencies:
1) Make sure enough packets are kept "in flight". Simply sending one packet and then waiting for the other side to say "got it, send then next one" doesn't cut it; that would limit throughput to five packets per second on a path with a 200 ms RTT. So TCP tries to make sure it sends enough packets to fill up the link, but not so many that it oversaturates the link or path. This works well for big data transfers.
2) For smaller data transfers TCP uses a "slow start" mechanism. Because TCP has to wait for acknowledgments from the receiver, more latency means more time spent in slow start. Web browser performance used to be limited by slow start a lot, but browsers started to reuse TCP sessions that were already out of slow start to download additional images and other elements rather than keep opening new TCP sessions.
3) Also you may use simple open-transfer-close-open-transfer-close sequences that work well on low latency networks but slow down a lot over larger distances or on bandwidth-limited networks, which also introduce additional latency.
4) Try to use a DNS server close by. Every TCP connection is preceded by a DNS lookup. If the latency towards the DNS server is substantial, this slows down the entire process.

Packet loss
Packets are lost in networks for two reasons:
1) Every transmission medium will flip a bit once in a while, and then the whole packet is lost. Wireless typically sends extra error correction bits, but those can only do so much. If such an error occurs, the lost packet needs to be retransmitted. This can hold up a transfer.
But if network latency or packet loss get too high, TCP will run out of buffer space and the transfer has to stop until the retransmitted lost packet has been received. In other words: high latency or high loss isn't great, but still workable, but high latency and high loss together can slow down TCP to a crawl.
2) Another reason packets get lost is too many packets in a short time: TCP is sending so fast that router/switch buffers fill up faster than packets can be transmitted.If TCP has determined that the network can only bear very conservative data transfer speeds, and slow start really does its name justice, it's faster to stop a download and restart it rather than to wait for TCP to recover.
Jitter - is the difference between the latency from packet to packet
Obviously, the speed of light isn't subject to change, and fibers tend to remain the same length. So latency is typically caused by buffering of packets in routers and switches terminating highly utilized links. (Especially on lower bandwidth links, such as broadband or 3G/4G links.) Sometimes a packet is lucky and gets through fast and sometimes the queue is longer than usual. For TCP, this isn't a huge problem, although this means that TCP has to use a conservative value for its RTT estimate and timeouts will take longer. However, for (non-TCP) real-time audio and video traffic, jitter is very problematic, because the audio/video has to be played back at a steady rate. This means the application either has to buffer the "fast" packets and wait for the slow ones, which can add user-perceptible delay, or the slow packets have to be considered lost, causing dropouts.

In conclusion, in networks that use multiple connections to the internet, it can really pay off to avoid paths that are much longer and thus incur a higher latency than alternative paths to the same destination, as well as congested paths with elevated packet loss. The path selecting process can be performed automatically: learnhow to automate evaluation of packet loss and latencyacross multiple providers to choose the best performing route.

on Jan 27, 2015 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

When a User Connects to Devices Such as a Server Through a Switch, the Connection Speed Is Slow and Packet Loss Occurs Sometimes. Why?


In SV100R001 and SV100R002, packets are discarded when a large number of ARP entries exist on the switch, ARP hash conflicts occur on the chassis switch(such as S3700-52P-EI-24S-AC), entries fail to be delivered, or traffic is slowly forwarded in software forwarding mode. In this case, services are affected. In SV100R006 or later versions, ARP entries are delivered to the defip table after ARP hash conflicts occur. The problem of packet loss is resolved.

Jul 27, 2016 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Packet loss


assuming that this is happening with BOTH wired and wireless....


Connect a PC to one of the switch ports with an Ethernet cable. Login to the Admin utility of the Router and go to "System Tools" at the bottom of the left-pane. it will expand, then choose -Diagnostics-, then use that to Ping yahoo.com or google.com and see if the packet loss is happening there.

If it *IS* happening there, then the problem is not the Router...it's getting what the modem is sending, so your fault would either be with the Modem itself, or with your service provider's equipment. You would call your provider, explain your packet-loss experience and they will check it out for you.

If there is no packet-loss coming-in to the Router, then :
Ensure that the antennae are straight (if the problem is wireless only.)
Ensure that you do not "stack" the Router on top of the Modem or the Modem on top of the Router. The heat from the bottom appliance will, over time, cook the one on top.

Beyond that, you can "save" the Router's configuration file, then perform a "Reset" of the Router, then Re-load the config file and check it out.....

Tallon41

Sep 18, 2012 | TP-LINK TL-WR941ND Advanced Wireless N...

1 Answer

I cannot access the internet via my samsung b3310 mobile


Hello
Internet access on your mobile or mobile broadband is possible by connecting via GPRS (General Packet Radio Service). GPRS 2.5G is a packet-switching service. It allows you to access the Internet by sending packets of data over the Internet. You can send and receive email with GPRS. It supports WAP, SMS text messaging and other data communications. When you click on the Web icon on your mobile phone, you get connected to the Internet. For the internet setting/configuration on your mobile you may contact your mobile service provider by calling on help line or visiting their nearest office.
Hope it helps if so do rate the solution

Dec 27, 2010 | Samsung B3310 Cell Phone

1 Answer

Why i cannot connect broadband connection through switch more than one computer at same time? But only one computer can connect.


Internet through your broadband connection is normally setup for single user.
If you need to use multiple systems to be connected to internet then you need NAT (Network Address Translation) to be enabled.
But unfortunately the D-Link DES-1008D doesnt support that.

Dec 02, 2010 | D-Link DES-1008D 8-Port Ethernet Switch...

1 Answer

I have a Belkin N1 Vision Wireless router and its performance is poor, i have checked it via the pingtest site and it constantly has a packet loss of 20% or higher and poor stats re ping and jitter tests...


PAULUS

The first question I have is have you tried connecting to router via wired and wireless and ran the tests to see if the issue is with your wireless signal.

Then next thing to look at is connecting your modem to your computer and run the same test because the problem could be with your connection in your area. Note even through your modem is working properly you still could have bandwidth issues in your area and your ISP may not tell you that there is an issue like that in your area.

The last thing to look at is how long you have had the router for. If you have had the router for serveral years it is possible that it is just time to have the unit replaced.

Let me know if you have any more problems or questions.

Issken

Jan 30, 2010 | Belkin N1 Wireless-N Wireless Router

2 Answers

Internet Connection won't work


if your router have freeware, like for example you type it on IE, http://192.168.1.1 so this mean you are accessing your router, in this method you can see the default connection of your router itself identifying the IP, DNS and gateway address, this time you know what is your exact address going to you PCs...

Jun 18, 2009 | D-Link DI-604 4-Port Cable/DSL Router...

1 Answer

I have 20mb broadband but only 300kbs download speed


I personally have never known that changing the MTU setting can speed up your connection, as the MTU is the maximum transmition units that is sent to your pc from each web site and if the MTU setting is incorrect then some web sites will not load on your explorer page, the speed at which you download the page will not make any difference.

If you are supposed to get 20MB speed then you must be on cable and not ADSL as ADSL is a max of 8MB, so i would ring up Virgin or whoever and check the speed you should really be getting.

See these details posted on the netgear site, and you'll notice there is no mention of speed:-

Details About MTU
A packet sent to a device larger than its MTU is broken into pieces. Ideally, MTU would be set to the same — large — value on all your computers, routers and switches, as well as on all the parts of the Internet that you access. But you cannot control the MTU on the Internet, and in practice the optimum MTU size on your LAN is related to your hardware, software, wireless interference, etc.
  • Tweaking MTU size may work well in one situation, but cause performance and connection problems in others.
  • When network devices with different MTU settings communicate, packets are fragmented to accommodate the one with the smallest MTU.
  • Windows XP sets MTU automatically, that is, it optimizes computer MTU for you. This Microsoft article explains resolving lack of connection to a broadband ISP using Windows XP: How-To Configure Broadband Connections Using PPPoE.
  • Once a network device fragments a packet, the data stays fragmented until arriving at the destination computer.
Setting MTU size is a process of trial-and-error: start with the maximum value of 1500, then reduce the size until the problem goes away. Using one of these values is likely to solve problems caused by MTU size:
  • 1500. The largest Ethernet packet size; it is also the default value. This is the typical setting for non-PPPoE, non-VPN connections. The default value for NETGEAR routers, adapters and switches.
  • 1492. The size PPPoE prefers.
  • 1472. Maximum size to use for pinging. (Bigger packets are fragmented.)
  • 1468. The size DHCP prefers.
  • 1460. Usable by AOL if you don't have large email attachments, etc.
  • 1430. The size VPN and PPTP prefer.
  • 1400. Maximum size for AOL DSL.
  • 576. Typical value to connect to dial-up ISPs.

Nov 22, 2007 | Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition

1 Answer

MTU


MTU, Partial Loss of Internet Connection, and Performance MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) is the largest packet a network device transmits. The best MTU setting for NETGEAR equipment is often just the default value. MTU is sometimes presented as something that can be easily changed to improve performance, but in practice this may cause problems. Leave MTU unchanged unless one of these situations applies: 1. You have problems connecting to your ISP or other Internet service, and their technical support (or NETGEAR's) recommends changing MTU. For example, these services may require an MTU change: * Yahoo email * MSN * AOL's DSL service 2. You use VPN, and have severe performance problems. 3. You used a program to "optimize" MTU for performance reasons, and now you have connectivity or performance problems. * An easy solution to most problems is to change MTU to 1400. * If you are willing to experiment, gradually reduce MTU as described in "Details of MTU", below. How to Change a Computer's MTU Size Note: If you change MTU on one computer, it is likely you will want to change it on your other computers, switches, and routers, as well. Instructions for changing MTU on other NETGEAR devices is found in the Reference Manuals. The third party Dr. TCP software can be used to change the MTU setting. 1. Download it from this link, choosing the zip file or the exe file at the top of the page. 2. Run the utility. 3. In the Adapter Settings pull down, select the Ethernet driver and adapter used to connect with the network. 4. In the MTU box, type the MTU size you are trying. 5. Click in any other box, without changing the data there. 6. Click Save. 7. Click Exit. 8. Restart the computer. Details About MTU A packet sent to a device larger than its MTU is broken into pieces. Ideally, MTU would be set to the same ? large ? value on all your computers, routers and switches, as well as on all the parts of the Internet that you access. But you cannot control the MTU on the Internet, and in practice the optimum MTU size on your LAN is related to your hardware, software, wireless interference, etc. * Tweaking MTU size may work well in one situation, but cause performance and connection problems in others. * When network devices with different MTU settings communicate, packets are fragmented to accommodate the one with the smallest MTU. * Windows XP sets MTU automatically, that is, it optimizes computer MTU for you. This Microsoft article explains resolving lack of connection to a broadband ISP using Windows XP: http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/networking/learnmore/ppoe.mspx * Once a network device fragments a packet, the data stays fragmented until arriving at the destination computer. Setting MTU size is a process of trial-and-error: start with the maximum value of 1500, then reduce the size until the problem goes away. Using one of these values is likely to solve problems caused by MTU size: * 1500. The largest Ethernet packet size; it is also the default value. This is the typical setting for non-PPPoE, non-VPN connections. The default value for NETGEAR routers, adapters and switches. * 1492. The size PPPoE prefers. * 1472. Maximum size to use for pinging. (Bigger packets are fragmented.) * 1468. The size DHCP prefers. * 1460. Usable by AOL if you don't have large email attachments, etc. * 1430. The size VPN and PPTP prefer. * 1400. Maximum size for AOL DSL. * 576. Typical value to connect to dial-up ISPs.

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