Question about Fuji FinePix S1 Pro Digital Camera

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Overexposed I can`t take shots under sunlight, my pictures always get overexposed the iso setting is 320, I`ve to shoot with f22 and 2000.

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Re: overexposed

Try it in auto mode if it is the same condition do u feel change in color like white turning pink or purple or sort of over exposed pics as u said then i worry that ur CCD HR is going to faulty in coming days later on pics will get pink and purple and then ccd stops working completely , i hope this is not the case do let me know if i can help u

Posted on Feb 21, 2009

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Shoot pictures of the moon best setting for that

Hi. I would recommend first you use a tripod or some stable support, second the best settings would be Aperture priority and use something in the region of f56-f8 or Manual and set f5.6-f8 and use the exposure indicator to adjust the shutter speed, use the spot meter function on the camera if you have it and vary the exposure by shooting at the recommended exposure and also by shooting overexposed and underexposed. Trial and error is really the only way to go.Set the ISO to 100 or 200 to get the best resolution as you will probably have to zoom it up to 200% on your computer screen to have a good image.

Apr 15, 2014 | Canon PowerShot SD1200 IS / Digital IXUS...

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I am shooting with a Nioon D200 and I have to shoot at 100 iso and 1.8 in the shade in the daytime.If I go over 200 all I have it dark pics no matter my f-stop.Is this a camera malfunction.( my friend...

If you're shooting: ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second, it is the same as:
ISO 200, f1.4 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 400, f1.4 @ 1/4000 second, etc.. Because each time you double the ISO value, you need 1/2 the light for a proper exposure. The ISO is the camera sensor (or film) "sensitivity to light". The higher the ISO, the more sensitive it is. That's why in the examples above, the shutter is opened 1/2 as long (or it is twice as fast - whichever you like to look at it). But it doesn't stop there..

That same ISO 100, f1.4 @ 1/1000 second picture is also the same as:
ISO 100, f2.0 @ 1/2000 second, or
ISO 100, f2.8 @ 1/1000 second, or
ISO 100, f4.0 @ 1/500 second, etc.. This is because each FULL f-stop (1.4, 2.0, 2.8, 4.0, 5.6, 8.0, 11, 16, 22 and 32) each allow TWICE as much light than the previous (higher f-stop number). f1.4 allows 2x more light than 2.0, which allows 2x more than 2.8 which allows 2x more than 4.0, and so on. So, if you get twice the light from one aperture than the previous full f-stop, and the ISO is the same, then the length of time the shutter is open must be reduced by 1/2. Hence, 1/500 is half as long as 1/1000, which is half as long as /12000, etc.

It can be represented like the exposure triangle below:
All this shows is that all three variables control the exposure. If your main objective is to change the Depth of Field (DoF), adjust Aperture and one or more of the others to get a properly exposed picture. Likewise, if you want to suggest or stop motion, you'd adjust shutter speed first - faster to stop the motion or slower to suggest motion by creating blur. ISO introduces grain to the image. The lower the the ISO value, the finer the grain is (may not even be perceptible). The smoothest color gradients come from the lowest ISO values - but they need to most light. A tripod may be needed unless shooting in direct sunlight or other brightly lit subject. ISO is a lifesaver for poorly lit subjects, night time photography, or other indoor shooting without a tripod or speedlight. The ability to shoot good looking pictures at ISO 3200 means that you need only 1/32 of the light needed when shooting at ISO 100. That means that under the right circumstances, you could hand hold the camera at ISO 3200 when the same picture taken at ISO 100 would take 32x longer. Of course, grain comes into the mix here. It may be too grainy for your likes. Experiment to how high you can set your ISO with acceptable results.

Below is a chart of the full shutter speeds, stops and ISO values. Many cameras break these down further into 1/3 steps for even more minute control. Basically, if you change the value of either shutter speed, f-stop or ISO values 1, 2, 3, 6, 9 - or however many steps - you need to adjust one or both of the others an equivalent amount to compensate to get a properly exposed picture.


Lastly, make sure you haven't set exposure compensation to a negative value. Press and hold the the "+/-" button (has a green dot) on the top panel next to the shutter release button. Spin the rear thumb dial so that it is niether plus or minus. Minus makes the picture dark (underexposed) and Plus makes it brighter (overexposed).

I hope this was helpful and good luck! Please rate my reply - thanks!

Oct 12, 2011 | Nikon D200 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

My Canon IXUS 120IS has developed some problem. All the shots are overexposed. I have tried all different setting but still the shots are coming overexposed. IS it a problem with the settings or hardware...

Check the ISO it too high for the lighting conditions? Check the "exposure compensation" should be at "0". If you want darker pictures, you can set it to a lower number.

Jan 14, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Overexposed photos on a nikon D60 in sunlight

You could set the white balance to the full sun setting. You could set the ISO to a lower number. You could set the "exposure compensation" to a lower number.

Jul 14, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures are over exposed when outside

You may have the settings wrong. Check in the MENU to see if you have it set to "inside" pics rather than outside.
Also the ISO has a lot to do with the exposure. If the iso is set too low outside sunlight pics will be white or overexposed. Try setting ISO on wheel for various options select program mode button and MENU select ISO 120 or 250. These are are pretty general settings. the flash will only engage inside or outside if the light is low ( like evening) I suspect your ISO setting is at a setting that is incompatible with bright sunlight
Also select White Balance and move it to DAYLIGHT

take a few shots inside and out to see if there is an improvement.

Please rate my help++++Thanks for using FIXYA

May 29, 2010 | Samsung Digimax L60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Overexposed pictures

usually all the digital cameras have a filter to diminishes the quantity of light passed through objective. This filter is enabled by a small relay and that relay is powered by a mobile wire from the mother board. Because this wire are always moved every time when the zoom is used ,this action can cause the interruption of that wire.
The second possibility is that relay to get stuck and can`t be able to switch the filter.

Sep 15, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A460 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures a very overexposed. Inside I can shoot without a flash at 400 ISO and they come out right. Outside they turn white. Also the shutter speed won't register. I can set it at 125 or even 500 and it...

Have you set the 400 ISO, or do you have the camera on Auto ISO?
Go back to your setup menus and set the Sensitivity to the lowest ISO value possible.  Now set the White Balance to Auto. Exit the menus.
Now set the camera to P for program. In effect, you have turned the camera into a point-and-shoot dimwit. It should now take reasonably well exposed shots indoor and outdoor.
If the shutter speed does not register on the body, you should put the dial on Tv and see if you can alter the speeds.  Remember, not all finctions are available for all dial settings.

Jun 22, 2009 | Pentax *ist D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D100 while shooting F--- appears and camera will not work

I had similar problem with D80 try removing the lens and cleaning the contacts. that seemd to work well for me.

Oct 15, 2008 | Nikon D100 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Picture display result

Which mode are you shooting in?
You may have adjusted the exposure compensation so everything is washed out.

Whatever the cause, your images are overexposed. Try shooting in auto and the camera should take over the settings, but if you are in other modes, check your shutter speed, aperture, & ISO also. These are all things that can cause too much light and wash the picture out/OVEREXPOSE.

If you have any other questions or can give me more details, just ask!

Hope this helps!

Jun 01, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A460 Digital Camera

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