Question about Honeywell HFS641P Stand (Pedestal) Fan

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Wall switch I just relocated my ceiling fan from one room to another room. I took down the existing fan and put up the relocated fan. Now the only way I can turn on the light in this room is by using the ceiling fan remote. I would much tather the fan light turn on with the wall switch rather than the remote. The wall switch will not turn the fan or the light on. What can I do to get the light to work by the wall switch.

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Re: Wall switch

I had this same problem (sort of) - my daughter lost the remote to our fan and it would not work from the wall switch. What you have to do is go up to where your fan is connected to the ceiling, slide the canopy down, and remove the remote transmitter. Then just rewire the fan normally - white to white, black and blue to black, and the ground wires together. Turn on the power and your fan light should work with the wall switch. You will have to pull the cord for the fan to work.

Posted on Jan 07, 2008

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Why my Hunter Ceiling Fan does not work?

Its unlikely that the fan is on a separate feed from the breaker box than the rest of the outlets in your room but you never know. It would not hurt to check all of your breakers. If the fan and its light are controlled by the same wall switch then the wall switch may have went bad. Within the fan there are separate wires for the fan and the light so both of them would not go out at the same time. It makes more sense that the problem is at your wall switch.

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Wiring ceiling fan with three cables coming from the box

Both wall switches would have to be connected to the black wire coming out of the fan.

Mar 03, 2013 | Fans

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Box in ceiling has black wire and white wire & the ceiling fan has white wire, black wire and red wire.

BEFORE YOU PERFORM ANY CONNECTIONS BE SURE THAT THE CORRECT CIRCUIT BREAKER FOR THE BOX HAS BEEN TURNED OFF! You must check for voltage between the white and black wires at the ceiling box with each of your two wall switches toggled up or down ONE AT A TIME!
The green wire in the ceiling box (or bare copper wire) is your ground wire and should be connected to the green wire of the fan, and also should be mechanically connected to the electrical box by a screw or clip. If your system was wired correctly you should find that it already is connected to the box.
The white wire in the ceiling box is your neutral wire, so any and all white wires from the fan should be connected to it. You may have one for the fan motor and one for the light kit if there are two separate whites from the fan. Again, they may already be connected together in the fan/light assembly.
The black wire in the ceiling box is switched on and off from either of the two switches in the room, which I assume are located near two different doors to the room. These are called "three-way switches". They are not marked "on" and "off" on the toggle like any single-light switches in your home. That is why you must check for power at the ceiling box with the switches in each position one at a time to make sure that the circuit is de-energized.
Now for the connections:
You will need to connect both the red and black wires from the fan to the black wire from the electrical box. The black wire in your ceiling box is your "hot" wire and will provide power to both the fan motor (black wire) and to the light through the red wire--(sometimes this wire is blue, for others who are following this post).
With this arrangement, your fan and light will only operate with one or the other of your three-way switches completing the circuit from your breaker box. You will have to use the pull chains on the fan to control the fan and lights. So you will probably want to leave the light "pulled on" so that you can control the room lighting from either of your three-way switches, and operate your fan speeds from the pull chain. However, if you want your fan only on at night you will have to "pull off" the fan's light switch.
You may find all this switch flipping and chain pulling an inconvenience. If so, hire an electrician to install wiring so that the ceiling box will be "hot" all the time to the fan's black wire and the fan will therefore be operated by the pull chain only, and the light kit will be controlled by either of the three way switches, via the fan's red (or blue) wire.
One other caveat before you begin: you must make sure that the ceiling box is rated for and mounted sturdily so that it will support the weight of the fan and light kit. Many ceiling boxes are designed and mounted to support only a light-weight fixture. You don't want your fan to come crashing down from the ceiling!

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1 Answer

How to wire this fan

The wiring on most paddle / ceiling fans id such:

White = Fan and Light neutral or "common"
Black = Fan line voltage or "hot"
Blue = Light line voltage or "hot"
Green = safety ground

If you are replacing an existing light fixture - be sure to replace the ceiling box with one designed for use with a fan - as per electrical code. If the existing box had only 2 wires (or 3 counting the ground) that connected to the old light fixture and it was controlled from a wall switch, the wiring would be fixture white to ceiling white, fixture black and fixture blue to ceiling black (or red) and fixture green to ceiling bare ground or connected to the metal box. This would power both the fan and light whenever the wall switch was on and the pull chains for each were also on. This is also the preferred wiring for replacement of a pull chain type light fixture (no wall switch present).

If there are other wires in the box that previously were not connected to the old light fixture, using a meter or tester - determine if there is constant power between the ceiling white wire and any of the these other wires (test with the wall switch on and off to be sure). If you do have constant power available, you might consider using the wall switch to control only the light, and using the pull chain to operate the fan (or vice-versa). Simply connect the black (for fan) or the blue (for light) to the "constant power on" wire and that part of the fixture will work by pull chain only - regardless of the wall switch position. If the fan can be shut off by the wall switch, it is very important that the wall switch remain a toggle (or on / off switch), do NOT replace with a dimmer type switch.

If you'd prefer to operate the fan and light completely independently of each other - you can purchase a 3rd party fan & light remote control device for between $30 - $50.

I hope this helps and good luck! Please rate my reply. Thanks!

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1 Answer

Move existing ceiling fan to another location

make sure light switch is off.
start by unscrewing the fan blades. take out bulbs and bulb covers etc.
once all thats down the fan and light switch cover has three screws you can take out and unplug it to get it out of the way. look around the base for some more screws to take out and remove the big cover thats covering the motor. get it out of the way. now you will see the bracket thats holding the motor in place. remove them screws and bolts, but be careful and ready, the motor is heavy, and as it comes down, normally hamptom bay has a coat hanger type hook that will let you hook the hanging motor on the hook long enuff to disconnect the wires ONE AT AT TIME and then put the wire nut back on it just for safety. when they are all disconnected , you can un hang the motor , and then inspect the new fan bracket, it probably fits the same hanger. but if not, you need to take the bracket motor hangar down and get the wires out of it. if the light switch is off IT WONT SHOCK YOU. just dont touch the bare wires to your hands ANYWAY. if they touch each other thats ok. IF THE WALL SWITCH IS OFF. ok now its removed.

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Unless you want to use pull chains, you will either have to get a different fan with a remote, or you can buy a remote to ADD to an existing fan/light. It hooks up under the base of the lamp. They seem to work better than the factory fans with the built in remotes.

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