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Operating system during installing how do i create or allocate space for each drive....plz hlp

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Just enter the unallocated partition. then delete it and then enter the size you need. work over.

Posted on Jan 06, 2008

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Partation unallocated problem solve


specify which operating system you are using coz it seems during your o/s installation you created a partition which you never confirmed its allocated either d: e: f: you could have selected the partition and click create.

Aug 11, 2013 | Lenovo 3000 Y410 Notebook

1 Answer

Seagate's DiscWizard, Extended Capacity Manager didn't recognize a hard disc with MBR partition style larger than 2TB when trying to maximize the capacity of the 3TB Seagate ST32000641AS drive...


Seagate Extended Capacity Manager

Seagate Extended Capacity Manager lets your operating system support large size discs with MBR partition style, so then you are able to use the space beyond 2 TB: this free space will be recognized as a separate disc, and will be accessible by your operating systems and applications as if it was a regular physical hard disc.

Seagate Extended Capacity Manager wizard will display all hard discs larger than 2 TB (unallocated or with MBR partition style). You can see, which disc space is recognized and allocated by Windows - this space is called Native Capacity in the wizard.

The space beyond 2 TB is displayed as Extended Capacity Zone. You can enable Extended Capacity Discs, and once it is done, this space will be visible by the operating system and ready for disc management operations.

Click Allocate space to see the possible disc space allocation in the next step.

After clicking Apply changes now button, the Extended Capacity Discs will be emulated on your physical disc. In case your physical disc is larger than 4 TB and the host operating system does not support a GPT partition layout, there will be several Extended Capacity Discs.

Note these Extended Capacity Discs are not bootable, and most properties will be the same as a physical disc's.

After allocating the space, you may temporary switch off Extended Capacity Discs by clicking the corresponding option. This will make Extended Capacity Discs invisible for Windows Disc Management tools, though the disc space will remain allocated.

To disable Extended Capacity Discs, click Remove partitions from Extended Capacity Zone and then click Apply changes now button in the next step: these discs will be removed from your system, and as a result - the disc space beyond 2 TB will become inaccessible

Sep 15, 2011 | Seagate Technology Barracuda Xt...

3 Answers

This is a Compaq Presario CQ62. It is 3 months old. The orange Compaq screen pops up but then the computer shuts down after just a few seconds. Have tried it unplugged, plugged in with and without the...


Simple test to determine if it's a hardware or software problem : try to boot in the BIOS. If you can't then it's hardware you should just return it, it's still in the warranty. If you can then Windows is totally corrupted so just reinstall it.

Dec 19, 2010 | Compaq Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Step of installing windows xp professional


Step 1. Basic Installation Start the computer and insert your windows xp cd. After a few seconds, the screen will clear and you will see a 'press any key to boot from CD' prompt. Press the any key..... he he, there is no 'any' key, this is just a test ;)
Press any key to start the install. The prompt allowing you to install will time out after about 4 seconds, so if you don't hit any of the keyboard keys you will have to reboot to install.
The installer program will begin copying files from the CD.


The 'welcome to setup' screen appears. Press enter to continue. View the licensing agreement and hit F8 to continue.
The installation program will then search your drives for any prior installation of XP. If it finds one, you will be given the option to repair it, which essentially reinstalls most system files while leaving the registry and installed programs intact. Otherwise, move forward to the partitioning and formatting section of the install.
The initial screen shows the hard disks connected to your system, and any partitions that may already be created.
A partition is simply a section of the free space on your hard-drive. Operating systems use partitions to logically assign drive letters. For example, if you have a single 40GB drive, you can allocate all the space to a single partition, but then you could only have a single drive (C:) visible in Windows.
If you chose to divide that 40GB into 4 different 10GB partitions, you could have 4 individual drives (say C:, D:, E:, and F:) within your Windows environment. Essentially, Multiple partitions allow multiple logical drives within a single physical drive, and can even allow different operating systems to co-exist on one drive if desired. Once a partition has been created, it must be formatted to be useful.

Aug 04, 2010 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2 Answers

Xp is not install


Best solution is to get and use the original restore discs.
If using a regular XP disc installation requires specific technical steps to boot from the disc , delete the existing partitions, format and install then download original drivers one at a time.
Getting the original restore discs would be alot easier than using an XP disc
hope this helps
Roety

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/eric_ab7c09ec01841771

Apr 03, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

I want to do partition of my hard disk.So please help me


You need to partition your hard drive before you install an operating system on it. If you boot off your windows CD and your hard drive has a partition already you will get a screen that prompts you to format it. You can also dellete the partition and make a new partition. AT that time you can select the size of the partition you want to make and creat multiple partitions. If you choose you can creat one smaller partition from the space available for you to format and install windows on and format the rest of the available space later on after windows is installed from the Administration Tools in control panel.

Jun 02, 2009 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

Recovery partitions


You' want to set aside some space where to create these backups, they are generally 25% of the total drive space.

the assumption is that there is no data on the drive to save. During the install it will ask where you want to install windows, if there are existing partitions delete them all. Then create one partition and specify it to be 75% of the drive (or whatever you prefer). Leave the rest unpartitioned.

Select the partition you created to install windows on.

Once you have installed windows and all the drivers etc, format the rest of the drive in Disk management (part of Computer management in Control Panel). Finally install your favourite software to create backup restore images, and set it to save on the partition you created.

NOTE: you will still need to back up on some external media, if the drive fails all data will be lost.

Hope this helps

Feb 01, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

2 Answers

How to add more space to my c drive using Vista


You have three routes:
1) Buy Partition Magic, install it and re-partition the disc. If you have a way to do it, back up all your data first.
2) Backup your data. Download the free, Open Source partition editor, GParted
Burn it to CD, following the instructions included with it. Boot the CD and change the partition sizes.
2) Back up all your data and re-install Windows from scratch. You may have to create the CD/DVD for this from the disc images already on the PC. There should be a utility already installed to do that if this is required.

Whilst doing so, you will usually (but not always!) be asked which disc partition you want to install Windows into.At this point, you can delete all existing partitions and create new ones (or a single large one) of the size(s) you want. When all is finished, restore your data.

Dec 01, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

Maxtor hard drive installation


Its a long process! First you have to transfer your saved files to disk. CD,DVD, or Floppy. Insert your copy of windows Install disk and turn your computer off and then back on. When Windows asks you if you want to repair or install a fresh version of windows, click fresh version. Have your copy of Serial Numbers ready for your Windows disk. Somewhere in the installation Windows will ask you if you want to install windows to the same drive? Delete this Partition? or Create a Partition?, Know how many Gigabyte or Megabyte your Hard drive is. Click on Delete Partition, Your Hard Drive is now Un-allocated. Now Click Create Partition and enter the amount of Bytes you want to allocate to C: drive, Usually half of what the computer is showing you what you have. Now you have a primary drive of C: and Un-Allocated space, Scroll down with your arrow key and select the unallocated drive and click create drive, the remainder of bytes on your drive will be allocated to that drive and assigned a different drive letter. (D) or what ever. Go back up to C: drive and say install windows to that drive, and from there just follow the windows installation. Good Luck.

Oct 27, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Defragmentation


Fragmentation occurs when the operating system cannot or will not allocate enough contiguous space to store a complete file as a unit, but instead puts parts of it in gaps between other files (usually those gaps exist because they formerly held a file that the operating system has subsequently deleted or because the operating system allocated excess space for the file in the first place). Larger files and greater numbers of files also contribute to fragmentation and consequent performance loss. Defragmentation attempts to alleviate these problems.
Example Consider the following scenario, as shown by the image on the right:
410px-file_system_fragmentation.svg.png An otherwise blank disk has 5 files, A, B, C, D and E each using 10 blocks of space (for this section, a block is an allocation unit of that system, it could be 1K, 100K or 1 megabyte and is not any specific size). On a blank disk, all of these files will be allocated one after the other. (Example (1) on the image.) If file B is deleted, there are two options, leave the space for B empty and use it again later, or compress all the files after B so that the empty space follows it. This could be time consuming if there were hundreds or thousands of files which needed to be moved, so in general the empty space is simply left there, marked in a table as available for later use, then used again as needed.[1] (Example (2) on the image.) Now, if a new file, F, is allocated 7 blocks of space, it can be placed into the first 7 blocks of the space formerly holding the file B and the 3 blocks following it will remain available. (Example (3) on the image.) If another new file, G is added, and needs only three blocks, it could then occupy the space after F and before C. (Example (4) on the image). Now, if subsequently F needs to be expanded, since the space immediately following it is no longer available, there are two options: (1) add a new block somewhere else and indicate that F has a second extent, or (2) move the file F to someplace else where it can be created as one contiguous file of the new, larger size. The latter operation may not be possible as the file may be larger than any one contiguous space available, or the file conceivably could be so large the operation would take an undesirably long period of time, thus the usual practice is simply to create an extent somewhere else and chain the new extent onto the old one. (Example (5) on the image.) Repeat this practice hundreds or thousands of times and eventually the file system has many free segments in many places and many files may be spread over many extents. If, as a result of free space fragmentation, a newly created file (or a file which has been extended) has to be placed in a large number of extents, access time for that file (or for all files) may become excessively long.
The process of creating new files, and of deleting and expanding existing files, may sometimes be colloquially referred to as churn, and can occur at both the level of the general root file system and in subdirectories. Fragmentation not only occurs at the level of individual files, but also when different files in a directory (and maybe its subdirectories), that are often read in a sequence, start to "drift apart" as a result of "churn".
A defragmentation program must move files around within the free space available to undo fragmentation. This is a memory intensive operation and cannot be performed on a file system with no free space. The reorganization involved in defragmentation does not change logical location of the files (defined as their location within the directory structure).

Jul 20, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Server Standard 2003 for...

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