Question about Dryers

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Dryer too hot

My dryer was not providing any heat. I investigated and found that one of the circuits (4 terminal switch) the high temperature cutout switch on the heater duct was open. Replaced the switch and now the dryer appears to be running too hot. The top of the dryer is getting too hot to comfortably touch.

I checked and found thatthere is good air flow throughthe drum and out the vent. Ialso checked that I had not distrubed the position ofthe heater duct and found that to be OK.

Any thoughts on why the dryer is getting much hotter than normal?

Thanks for your help.

John

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  • Yoshu Apr 23, 2008

    I have found that the dryer runs hot only if the timer is set to continue operation after the cloths are dry, i.e. moisture is not available to cool the heated air. This lead me to investigate further and I found an exhaust air temperature sensing switch that was defective. This switch interrupts power to the heating coil when the exhaush air temperature is too high.

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If every thing ok what you say .than ck the same temperture switch. it is not trun off the heat . when it get to the high temperture. it is very dangers for the house

Posted on Jan 05, 2008

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It blows air but it is cold it does not get hot had thermail limi


If your dryer runs, but does NOT heat, you have a problem in the heating circuits. Any one of the following could be causing your problem:

1. Heating Element
2. Thermal Cut-Out (TCO)
3. Hi-Limit Thermostat
4. Improper input line voltage
5. Defective power cord.

The following link gives some advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits are located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand. Just remove the back panel of the dryer for access.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed also have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify the parts you need.

NOTE: In many cases the problem is NOT the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back with your complete MODEL NUMBER and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

NOTE: The door switch is a separate issue. You are right in your assumption that the switch is bad and needs to be replaced. However, a switch that stays on would normally cause the dryer to, not only run, but continue to heat.

Mar 18, 2010 | Kenmore Dryers

Tip

KNOWING ABOUT THERMOSTAT.


Normal 0 MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} What is a thermostat?
A thermostat is a device for regulating the temperature of a system so that the system's temperature is maintained near a desired set point temperature. The name is derived from the Greek words thermos "hot" and statos "a standing".
What is a dryer thermostat?
A dryer thermostat is usually oval shaped and about an inch and a half in length. The thermostat contains a bimetal that opens and closes a pair of contacts depending on the temperature inside the dryer. The bimetal inside the thermostat is designed to bend at specific temperatures. When the bimetal bends, it pushes an actuator. The actuator then pushes on a contact, opening the electrical circuit and breaking the electrical connection to the related component. When the thermostat cools, the bimetal returns to its original shape and the contacts close, allowing the current to flow through the circuit.
Have you ever thought about how hot your dryer gets? Thermostats and thermal fuses are put in dryers for your safety and if you don't maintain them, you could be putting yourself, your house, and your family at risk.
Your dryer uses of a combination of heat and airflow to dry your clothes. The heat generated in your dryer is produced by a heating element controlled by a series of thermostats. If any of your dryer's thermostats are defective, the results can be disastrous.
Here's how it works: The dryer is turned on and heat begins to radiate from the heating element into the dryer's drum. The air in the drum passes by a thermostat. As the thermostat reaches its maximum temperature, the bimetal bends, cutting the power to the heating element. The circuit stays open until the bimetal cools. Because the heating element isn't providing additional heat, the dryer's temperature gradually falls. The bimetal returns to its original shape and the electric current flows to start the heating element again. This process happens many times throughout your dryer's cycle.
There are at least two thermostats in your dryer: cycling (operating) thermostat and hi-limit safety) thermostat. The difference between these two thermostats is their opening and closing temperatures.
The cycling thermostat is typically found in the path of the air leaving the drum. A cycling thermostat is usually found on the fan housing or just under the lint filter area, on the blower wheel housing or inside the venting/exhaust system.
Some dryers may have as many as five thermostats - one for each of the different heat cycles. The temperature setting or cycle selected determines which thermostat is used to control the heat. If your dryer is malfunctioning on the low heat setting, the thermostat for that particular setting is probably defective.
The thermostats for the high and medium temperature selections are not the problem. However, if the dryer isn't working properly for most of the heat settings, it's probably a problem with your vent rather than the thermostats.
The hi-limit thermostat protects your dryer from overheating. This thermostat is usually found on the heating element, housing, or cage assembly. If the airflow in the dryer becomes obstructed by a plugged or improperly installed vent, bad drum seals, or a defective blower, the high-limit thermostat cuts power to the heating element. This means there are other problems with your dryer.
In conjunction with thermostats, dryers use thermal fuses as a safety device. Some dryer models may have two thermal fuses to detect extreme heat. If the hi-limit thermostat fails to cut power to the heating element and the element gets too hot, the thermal fuse blows and cuts all power to the dryer. This could mean that a thermostat is defective or something is wrong with your venting duct, filters, seals, or blower. You cannot reset thermal fuses so once they blow they must be replaced. Get the proper replacement fuse for your model and replace the hi-limit thermostat as well. Never bypass a thermal fuse.
Have a look at your dryer's manual for the locations of its thermostats. It's unusual for a dryer's thermostat to continue operating at a different temperature than originally intended and the only way to test for this would be by checking the temperature of the exhaust. You can do this by placing a pocket thermometer inside the exhaust vent. This test is done with the dryer running, so be extremely careful.
Checking continuity is another way to test your thermostat. There's a wire leading to each of the thermostat's terminals. The wires are connected by metal slip-on connectors. Label the wires before you remove them so that you're able to correctly reconnect them later. To remove the wires use needle nose pliers to pull on the connectors - don't pull on the wires themselves.
Set your multimeter to the RX1 setting. With the thermostat at room temperature, touch one meter probe to one terminal and touch the other meter probe to the other terminal. You should receive a reading of zero. If a thermostat is tested when it's heated to its limit, a reading of infinity should be produced. You should replace your thermostat if it fails either of these tests.
The thermostat is attached to the dryer with two screws. Remove both screws and discard the faulty thermostat. Install a new thermostat, securing it in place with two screws. Reconnect the two wires, put your dryer back together, and restore power to the dryer. Run your dryer through a cycle to make sure it's working properly.
Safety Warning: Before performing any tests or repairs on your dryer disconnect the power source to eliminate the risk of electric shock. You can do this by unplugging the dryer, removing the related fuse from the fuse box, or flipping the appropriate switch on the breaker panel.
For better protection of your family and yourself - maintain your dryer regularly. But if you can't do it yourself, make sure you contact a qualify service technician to do it for you. www.victorwod1234.blogspot.com

on Apr 08, 2010 | Refrigerators

2 Answers

Dryer is a Kenmore 70 Series Model # 110.64732400. Drum is rotating, but there is no heat


If the Thermal Fuse were blown, the dryer would not run at all. There is a difference between a THERMAL FUSE and a THERMAL CUT-OUT. Do not get the two confused.

If your dryer runs, but does NOT heat, you have a problem in the heating circuits. Any one of the following could be causing your problem:

1. Heating Element
2. Thermal Cut-Out (TCO)
3. Hi-Limit Thermostat
4. Improper input line voltage
5. Defective power cord.

The following link gives some advice on how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits are located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand. Just remove the back panel of the dryer for access.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed also have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify the parts you need.
Some part numbers you may need:

Heating Element (279838)
TCO/Hi-Limit Thermostat Kit (279816)

NOTE: In many cases the problem is NOT the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

Mar 09, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

Does not heat


If your dryer runs, but does NOT heat, the following link explains how to troubleshoot an ELECTRIC dryer with a no heat problem:

http://www.fixya.com/support/r3576548-dryer_runs_but_does_not_heat

First, begin by unplugging the dryer and verifying the voltage at the wall receptacle. You should read 220-240VAC across the two Hot terminals (left and right slots). If the voltage is incorrect, check to make sure you don't have a breaker tripped. Some homes use 2 separate 120VAC breakers to provide power to the receptacle vice using one 240VAC breaker.

If the voltage IS correct, leave the dryer unplugged and remove the cover plate on the terminal block in the back of the dryer (this is where the power cord is installed). Plug the dryer back in and take a voltage reading across the two hot (RED and BLACK) wires at the terminal block. You should read 220-240VAC. If the voltage is good, you have an internal heating problem. If the voltage is bad at the terminal block, but good at the receptacle, you have a bad power cord.

NOTE: If the wires at the terminal block are not color coded, the outer two wires (left and right) are the hot leads. The center conductor is neutral or ground.

The reason a dryer will still run if the input voltage is incorrect, is because the drive motor only uses a portion of the 220 service. The motor runs off 110-120VAC, while the heating circuits require 220-240VAC. So, if you are missing 1/2 your input voltage due to a tripped breaker or bad power cord, your dryer may exhibit these symptoms.

If you determine the problem to be internal, the heating circuits will either be located in the rear of the dryer on the right hand, or under the dryer drum on the right hand side. Usually, an easy way to determine is by the location of the lint screen filter. If the filter is on top of the dryer, the heating circuits are in the back of the dryer. If the lint screen is in the door, the heating circuits are located under the dryer drum.

The Heating Element is located inside a heater box. The Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) will be located on the outside of the heater box on the end opposite the heating element terminals. The Hi-Limit Thermostat will be located adjacent to the heating element terminals.

If either the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat are determined to be bad, replace BOTH components at the same time. That is why these components are commonly sold as a set. Failure to do so may result in premature failure of any parts you replace.

Replacement parts (if required) can be found at the following websites:

searspartsdirect.com
pcappliancerepair.com
appliancepartspros.com
repairclinic.com

The average cost of these components varies, so shop and compare. The first three websites I listed have helpful exploded view parts diagrams that can help you locate and properly identify the parts you need. The heating components are usually listed under the "Bulkhead" section.

NOTE: In many cases the problem is NOT the heating element. The heating element has protection devices that are designed to regulate the heat temperatures. If the dryer overheats the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) typically will blow BEFORE the heating element. The replacement kit is much cheaper than purchasing a new heating element that may or may not be the problem.

Read through the information I provided and, if you have any questions, please post back with your MODEL NUMBER (located around the door opening) and let me know. I hope you find this information is helpful.

Mar 01, 2010 | Estate EED4300VQ Electric Dryer

2 Answers

Dryer runs, no heat Whirlpool duet 9250


Most likely, it is the thermostat which controls the heating element. The Bios Thermostat will have two wires connected to a round disc which has a flange and screw holes to hold it next to the blower vent or the center of the drum. Use an ohm meter to see if it open or take it to an appliance parts store to have them check it for you. You may also see a thermal fuse and a high temperature cut-off thermostat which should not read open with an ohm meter. Any open thermostat will prevent the heater element from turning on. The part should be about $25.00.

Feb 15, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

The dryer is not producing any heat. What might


look for reset button for heating element,high temp cutout switch if electric--airflow switch, high temp cutout if gas

Feb 01, 2010 | Dryers

1 Answer

The Dryer does not generate high heat to dry clothes properly. Is it a hard ware problem or the electrical problem? thanks.


HI. There are a few areas i would advise to check to resolve this issue.

The dryer uses multiple thermostats to regulate the temperature. When the temperature is higher than the preset limit of a particular thermostat, the thermostat breaks the circuit and the heater goes off. When the temperature cools enough, the thermostat closes the circuit again and the heat can come on.

Most dryers have a choice of temperature settings, therefore a separate thermostat is used for each setting. The selector switch or timer control then routes the circuit through the appropriate thermostat.

If a thermostat fails, it may prevent the heat from coming on, This happens because the thermostat does not close the circuit when the temperature falls below the operating temperature of the switch. It is a simple matter to test a thermostat; it should show continuity when the switch is cool and no continuity when it is warmer than its rated temperature.

A thermostat can also fail by being always on, no matter what the temperature. This switch would show continuity whether it was hot or cold. In this case, the heater would not shut off and the the dryer could dangerously overheat. As a safety precaution a second thermostat is used, This is called a thermal fuse. The power will be cut to the heating circuit if the maximum safe temperature is exceeded. In most cases, this is a one time fuse. The heater circuit will not function until the fuse has been replaced. Of course, it will be necessary to determine and repair the underlying cause of overheating or the fuse will just cut out again. The most common cause of overheating will be a clogged ventilation assembly. Be sure to inspect the entire ventilation Assembly for build up. This will cause issues, if obstructions exist.

The thermostats are usually grouped together. The are typically oval in shape and about an inch and a half in size. They may be on the blower housing, under the lint trap or inside the vent line. There should be two wires connected to each thermostat.

Label the wires and connections so that you can properly reconnect them later. The wires are connected with slip on connectors. Firmly pull the connectors off of the terminals. You may need to use a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove the connectors. Inspect the connectors and the terminals for corrosion. If either is corroded they should be cleaned or replaced.

To test the thermostats or fuse, set the multimeter to the ohms setting X1. Touch one probe to each terminal. You should get a reading of either zero or infinity. At room temperature, the thermostats should have a reading of zero. When the thermostats are heated to their limit temperature, they should switch off and you should get a reading of infinity. The fuse should be tested at room temperature for continuity.

Dec 04, 2009 | Whirlpool Dryers

1 Answer

How do i get to the heating element for a kenmore dryer # 11062972102


Before accessing the heating element,:it very seldom fails
The most common cause of no heat to an otherwise functioning dryer is failure of the thermal cutout.
As well as the electric line fuses in the circuit there are devices that look like this 7883694.jpg or this c594de5.jpg screwed to the exhaust air duct or fan housing with wires to the terminals, inside the dryer. If there is a lint blockage in the duct or fan or outside vent hood, the air temperature rises and melts out this thermal cutout (also thermal fuse, heat protector, heat cutout & any other names different makers use) before causing a fire.
Test with an ohmmeter or battery and lamp bulb, conducts good, no conducts fail-replace.
Despite the number of models of dryer there are only a few thermal fuses, and the local parts guy WILL have the blown one on the shelf, as GE if not as kenmor part.

Whil the dryer case is opened is a good time to vacuum out the exhaust vents, fan impeller, and vent hood. ounce of prevention and all that

Sep 06, 2008 | Dryers

1 Answer

Guy at Sears parts said


safety thermostat, IS, thermal limit, IS thermal fuse, IS overtemperature cutout,
and probably half a dozen other names for the same item
The most common cause is burn out of the thermal cut-out. These are a small screw on device on the exhaust duct, when exhaust air reaches too high a temperature, like a blockage, they fail before a fire.
Clean the exhaust ducts all the way to the outside wall, lots of vent hoods block over time. then examin the exhaust duct for devices that look like this 2832e78.jpg or like this a5b1531.jpg with wires connected to the terminals. there may be 2(hi lo), test with a flashlilght bulb & battery, or ohmmeter
conductivity good,
no conductivity, replace,
they are not resettable.
There are only a few different kinds the local parts guy will have them. take the dud one for him to match.
Remove the plug from the wall before doing anything, remove the wires from the terminals before testing.
This a187dee.jpg is is the circuit for a kenmore dryer 24032,
220V overtemp cutout in the bottom right corner, is NOT connected to the 110V motor circuit.
The motor still runs when the cutout has blown
Sears sells you a $20 part,
or
arranges a $200 home service call,
somebody gets an attaboy for upsaling

Jul 29, 2008 | Kenmore 63942 Dryer

1 Answer

No heat


First port of call is thermal cutouts - little switches that monitor the temperature of the air going into the drum and cut the heat off before it sets your house on fire if something goes wrong and it all starts to get too hot.

Disconnect the power, then open the machine up. Look for the metal duct that directs the hot air into the drum (you'll recognise it by the funny-shaped blower bit at one end, and the collection of terminals sticking out of it at odd places about halfway along).

You'll find that some of those terminals are associated with flat coin or button like objects held tight against the surface of the duct (the number and exact appearance of these objects varies a little from amachine to machine). Look carefully at these, and you'll find that one or two of them have a little reset button in the middle of them. Check again that the power is off, then give each of these buttons a gentle prod. With a bit of luck, one of them will make a sharp clicking sound - you have just reset a tripped thermal cutout.

Check whether this has worked by running the machine. If it has, then you need to find out what made it overheat in the first place and stop it happening again. This usually just means giving all the filters and ducts a thorough clean to remove lint that's restricting the airflow.

If the thermal cutouts aren't to blame, then the next suspect is the heating element. Diagnosing this is a bit more involved, though still managable as a DIY job. Check the cutouts first, then come back if you need help checking the element.

A.

Feb 24, 2008 | Whirlpool LEQ9858P Electric Dryer

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