Question about Meade 8200 Monocular Microscope

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Focuser broken the focuser knob turns but nothing happens the stage moves up and down slightly manually but not the whole way there are little silver balls visible in bottom of unit

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Re: focuser broken

Its not repairable. Mine fell appart too. You cannot remove the stage. I opened it from the bottom. You would have to pry the whole frame appart. The plastic is too fragile and disintgerates. Never buy a platic framed microscope. Too bad, this one has reasonable optics....

Posted on Jun 29, 2009

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Re: focuser broken

Not really a solution, but anything is better than a posting that get's NO response. It sounds like the rack and pinion drive has collapsed. If you're good with your hands and have a knack for things mechanical maybe you can dissassemble the stage mounting and see how it's meant to work. If something has come loose rather than broken maybe you can fix it. If teeth have stripped from the drive gear - you may be unable to effect a repair. I guess trying to fix it is better than doing nothing. Have a good 2008


Posted on Jan 12, 2008

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The stage is not moving when the focussing Knobs are moved. The stage moves freely vertically. It's not attached, I'm sure it needs to be re aligned and a screw need tightening, but which screws?

Hi Faye , we will probably need more info

Does the stage move freely on its own without the course focus knobs

Can you move the stage up and down with either of the course focus knobs

Instrument details / picture would help .

Oct 07, 2015 | Microscopes

1 Answer

The small knob that moves the slideto the left or right on the platform (the one furthest from the observer) is slightly loose, and instead of rotating in a smooth circular motion it rotates rather...

The knob you are talking about is called the x-axis control knob. It does not directly affect the focus. What affects the focus is the slight manipulation of the stage and or slide while you are adjusting the x-axis control knob. It only takes the slightest pressure to throw the focus off very far. Theoretically you could completely remove the specimen holder and move the slide around with your fingers.
The specimen holder may need to be replaced but without further more detailed knowledge of the mechanical problem I cannot instruct further.

Oct 05, 2010 | Premiere Microscopes P-01310 Monocular...

1 Answer

Why should the coarse focusing knob not be used when focusing with the higher-powered objective lenses

There are two reasons. One reason is that when on high power you are working so close to the glass slide that it is easy to misjudge how much you are moving the specimen toward the lens that you can break a slide before you realize it. The coarse focus moves the stage with the specimen on it very fast and you only have a very very short distance within the focus plane before you run the objective lens into the slide.
Secondly, it is just harder to control the minute adjustments needed at the higher powers with the "coarse" focus knob. If you start at the low magnifications find what you want to concentrate on with the coarse focus knobs and then work your way up to the higher powers, you will have very little trouble moving to the fine focus controls at 40x and 100x while still having control of your image.

Sep 17, 2010 | Zhumell LOMO P-111 modular brightfield...

1 Answer

Stage slides down after focusing

There is a tension adjustment for this. It is located on the coarse focus knob which is on the same side as the switch. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. A strange looking tool should have come with the scope. It is designed to fit into these holes and allow you to adjust the tension on the coarse focus knob. You need to tighten it just a little bit. Not too much or you will have trouble operating the coarse focus knobs smoothly.

Jul 08, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

Swift microscope no 634008 having problem staying in focus when switching magnification

First, a scope of this grade will not be completely in focus as you move from one magnification to the next. But it should be close enough that you do not loose your point of interest.
Be sure you are not pressing down on the stage specimen platform as you change magnifications. It is very sensitive to pressure. Also, be sure that the coarse focus tension is tight enough that the platform is not drifting down imperceptibly as switch magnifications. Look through the scope and watch if the image goes out of focus while you are watching it. If so, you have what is called "stage drift". This is corrected by tightening the tension on the coarse focus knob.
The tension adjustment is on the coase focus shaft. It looks like a chrome ring with about 3 holes in it. There should have been a strange looking tool that came with your scope. It is used to adjust the tension. If your specimen is "drifting" out of focus, simply tighten the tension ring a little bit at a time until the specimen no longer goes out of focus. Do not get it so tight that it is not easy to operate the coarse focus knob.

May 22, 2010 | Swift M2251C Monocular Microscope

1 Answer

Russian Lomo (Biolam?) old monocular-coarse focus wheel slippage

The right hand shaft knob contains the coarse focus locking clutch adjustment mechanisim( big name-simple design). This solution applies if you have the model with the fine adjustment wheel mounted in the base and may or may not apply if your fine focus is in the left-hand knob.

Inside the right hand knob ( as viewed from the rear of the scope) is a threaded disk/nut which has two pins (Slightly and for reasons I don't understand: they are offset vertically, they have different pin diameters and different pin lengths) In theory, they lock into the bushing within the knob proper to keep tension on the clutches while keeping the knob from falling off.

The repair can proceed in two ways depending on if the disk/nut has totally been unscrewed from the focus shaft.

Gently pull the left knob and as you do turn it slowly to see if the pins reseat. If they do you'll feel a slight lurch outward of the knob. Hold gentle outward tension( so as the pins remain seated) as you turn the knob clockwise until the slippage in the clutches is so lessened that your knob is firm and the focus adjustment is operating to your liking.

IF that didn't work it is likely that the threaded disk/nut has come off the shaft and will need to be reset and screwed back down. The disk is easily cross threaded and you'll need tweasers or micro plyers or a hemostat and/or a flat headed finishing nail. Plus I recommend a small bottle of LOC-TITE(tm) semi-solid thread sealer--NOT the kind that freezes the threads

As you unscrew the knob counter clockwise pull on the knob to slid it off the shaft it should come off in your hand revealing about 6-8 washers on the shaft. These are the clutches so be careful not to loose them.

The knob should have a slight rattle and that is the disk nut. To get to the disk/nut put a small finishing nail head first into the shaft whole and push to release the plastic knob insert cover out being careful to not loose the disk/nut.

To clean the threads and insure an easier repair screw the disk onto the focus shaft to insure the threads are clean.

This next part works better with the scope lying on its left side.

This part is optional but not necessary to get the scope back in operation. Place a tiny amount of LOC-TITE thread sealer on the shaft threads. This will make the knob clutch adjustment more stiff but will also reduce the likelihood that the knob will be adjusted out too far again. The loosening occurs when the knob is turned before the operator realizes the pinion gear limit has been reached or by someone who dosen't understand correct opperation of the focusing assembly.. So long as the clutches are engaged the and there is no slack in tension the disk/nut shouldn't come off the shaft again.

Observe the pins in the disk/nut and match them up with the holes in the aluminium/brass knob bushing. You'll have to wiggle the disk around to get it reseated properly. Once you do, hold the disk firmly against the bushing to keep the pins seated as you put the knob back over the shaft, pushing it all the way down against the shaft.(The clutches are springy so don't worry about it locking in place just now).

You may prefer to hold the disk/nut and knob firmly with a finger and spin the left hand knob counter-closkwise for easier threading of the nut but remember this will also move the focus arm. Not a problem if you start with the focus in the range centered.

If using the right knob: Turn the knob clockwise feeling for the threaded shaft maiting back up with the threads. IF it cross-threads, back it off try again. Once the threads are engaged keep the outward tension on the knob so the pins don't slip out. When you/ve screwed it down far enough, the clutches will take up the slack and keep the knob from slipping away from the disk/nut. You'll know the clutches are engaged when the focus shaft turns.

If you are happy with the repair slip the knob cover back on and snap in place. It if falls out place a little of the thread sealer on the rim and try again.

If you like this solution it took me an hour to write it up. Please consider volunteering an hour with a local non profit. I support the American Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity and the USO.

Mar 27, 2009 | Lomo Microscopes

1 Answer

Stage slowly falls causing unfocus

Try holding the Right knob so it does not move, whilst firmly moving the Left knob towards you (clockwise), this is the adjusting method used on Zeiss Jena 1960's High End microscopes, e.g Eduaval & Ergaval.
Good luck,
Alan Mowle

Mar 05, 2009 | Microscopes

1 Answer

Problem with MF-02 binocular microscope stage

I think your problem lies in the way the stage is limited upwards. On top of the stage, right behind it where it slides against the arm, there should be a little screw.  This screw limits the movement of the stage to a certain point upwards.  If the limit exceeds the adjustment gear and its opposing track, then the stage just goes up one notch and then it clunks down.  If you screw it down the stage is limited further down, if you screw it up it's limited a bit higher.  The point of this screw is to prevent objective and slide damage.  Try adjusting this little screw a bit further down and see if it still 'clunks' when you turn it up.  After that we may work on properly adjusting it.  If not, please post again with whatever detail you can provide to aid you with this problem further.

May 28, 2008 | Premiere Microscopes MF-02 Binocular...

2 Answers


Diffrent company having their own system for microscope arm balacing.

Tell me which one microscope you have.

Auxillary arm or microscpe body sloly come down ward.

tell me problem is consult with which part..


Jan 02, 2008 | Tasco 750 Monocular Microscope

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