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CMOS battery replacement

I help my neighbor with her computer. She does not have an owners manual with any specifications. She is receiving two error messages on start up:
1) CMOS/GPNV checksum bad
2) CMOS Date/Time not set

As near as we can determine, she needs to replace the CMOS battery in her Gateway Desktop PC, Model 510S. Is there a specific # 3v lithium battery replacement. We have not checked the tower for the battery placement and do not know if it is visible.

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Your Pc should have an Intel E210882 motherboard in it.
A coin-cell battery (CR2032) powers the real-time clock and CMOS memory. When the computer
is not plugged into a wall socket, the battery has an estimated life of three years. When the
computer is plugged in, the standby current from the power supply extends the life of the battery.
The clock is accurate to ± 13 minutes/year at 25 ºC with 3.3 VSB applied.
When the voltage drops below a certain level, the BIOS Setup program settings stored in CMOS
RAM (for example, the date and time) might not be accurate. Replace the battery with an
equivalent one. Figure 14 shows the location of the battery.
These batteries are very common and can be purchased at Wal-Mart, Walgreens, Etc...
Here is a link to the motherboard manual with battery replacement procedures:
http://www.asi.com.au/support/Drivers/V206/Manual/SR_English.pdf

Posted on Jan 04, 2008

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Get a battery at walmart and put it in.

Posted on Jan 04, 2008

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Go to the setup and Load The default settings and set the time and Date then save the setting and reboot the system. hope this will work for you.

Posted on Jan 04, 2008

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The most common battery is the3 volt CR2032, that is the one most likely in your neighbors computer. You are right on the diagnosis the battery is bad.

Posted on Jan 04, 2008

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How do i remove and replace the cmos battery


If your computer is losing its time or date settings, or you are receiving a message CMOS Read Error, CMOS check sum error, or CMOS Battery Failure, first try leaving the computer on for 24-hours. In some cases, this can charge the battery and resolve your problem. This fixes most CMOS battery issues on computers left without power for several months. If this does not resolve your problem follow the steps...

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000239.htm

Oct 02, 2014 | Lenovo ThinkPad R60 R60e T60 T60p T61p...

Tip

CMOS Checksum error


<b>Issue:</b><br /> CMOS Checksum Bad or CMOS Date/Time Not Set<br /> <br /> <img src="matrix12_1.jpg" /> <br /> <br /> <b>Cause:</b><br /> This issue is caused when the CMOS values are incorrect. This issue can occur because of any of the below possibilities.<br /> * Bad or old CMOS battery. <br /> * BIOS update<br /> <br /> <b>Workaround 1:</b><br /> 1. Disconnecting power from computer without shutting down computer.<br /> 2. Attempt to reboot the computer. If error still occurs after rebooting the computer enter CMOS setup and check all values, this includes verifying the time and date are correct. Once everything has been verified and/or changed make sure you save and exit CMOS setup. <br /> 3. If you have a Phoenix BIOS and have an option for 'Reset Configuration Data', set this value to 'Yes' and save and exit the CMOS. <br /> <p>4. If the computer was had the power disconnected while it was still running it is possible this could cause the CMOS to become corrupt. Ensure that the computer is ready to be shut off before turning off the computer. If you have a laptop computer ensure that the battery is charged before disconnecting the power connection. <br /> 5. If the CMOS values have become corrupted entering the values in CMOS setup and saving and exiting CMOS should resolve your issues.<br /> <p><b>Note:</b> If this issue continues to occur after you turn off your computer off it is possible that the CMOS battery may be failing or already bad. Before considering replacing the CMOS battery try leaving your computer on for several days. <br /> <b>Workaround 2:</b><br /> <p>If you performed workaround 1 and the error occurs again after a complete power down (i..e. removing the power cord), the CMOS battery is likely bad. Most systems use a small coin style lithium battery. These often last 3-6 years, but at some point run out of juice and need to be replaced. For desktops, your system manual or motherboard manual should specify the type of battery and location on the motherboard. For laptops, it is often very difficult to access and may require a professional to replace it. To replace the battery on a desktop system:<br /> 1. Turn off the system and remove the power plug.<br /> 2. Remove the case or side panel to access the motherboard. <br /> 3. Look for a round silver coin cell, typically in a black holder.<br /> <br /> <br /> <img src="matrix12_0.jpg" /> <br /> 4. Remove the battery while noting which way the battery is located. You may need a small flat screwdriver to release the side clip. <br /> 5. Install the replacement battery with the same battery type, being careful to insert it in the same direction as the removed battery (or using the polarity marked on the holder or manual). <br /> 6. Reassemble the case and power. <br /> 7. Turn on the power. You will get the CMOS Checksum Bad error once more, but it should be the last time. Go into the BIOS setup and set the date and time, and any other options you prefer.<br /> <br /> <br /> Hope this will help...Your response is very much appreciated...

on Jan 24, 2011 | Computers & Internet

Tip

CMOS Checksum error


Issue:
CMOS Checksum Bad or CMOS Date/Time Not Set


ae4e911.jpg
Cause:
This issue is caused when the CMOS values are incorrect. This issue can occur because of any of the below possibilities.
* Bad or old CMOS battery.
* BIOS update.

Workaround 1:
1. Disconnecting power from computer without shutting down computer.
2. Attempt to reboot the computer. If error still occurs after rebooting the computer enter CMOS setup and check all values, this includes verifying the time and date are correct. Once everything has been verified and/or changed make sure you save and exit CMOS setup.
3. If you have a Phoenix BIOS and have an option for 'Reset Configuration Data', set this value to 'Yes' and save and exit the CMOS.
4. If the computer was had the power disconnected while it was still running it is possible this could cause the CMOS to become corrupt. Ensure that the computer is ready to be shut off before turning off the computer. If you have a laptop computer ensure that the battery is charged before disconnecting the power connection.
5. If the CMOS values have become corrupted entering the values in CMOS setup and saving and exiting CMOS should resolve your issues.
Note: If this issue continues to occur after you turn off your computer off it is possible that the CMOS battery may be failing or already bad. Before considering replacing the CMOS battery try leaving your computer on for several days.
Workaround 2:
If you performed workaround 1 and the error occurs again after a complete power down (i..e. removing the power cord), the CMOS battery is likely bad. Most systems use a small coin style lithium battery. These often last 3-6 years, but at some point run out of juice and need to be replaced. For desktops, your system manual or motherboard manual should specify the type of battery and location on the motherboard. For laptops, it is often very difficult to access and may require a professional to replace it. To replace the battery on a desktop system:
1. Turn off the system and remove the power plug.
2. Remove the case or side panel to access the motherboard.
3. Look for a round silver coin cell, typically in a black holder.


06928b6.jpg
4. Remove the battery while noting which way the battery is located. You may need a small flat screwdriver to release the side clip.
5. Install the replacement battery with the same battery type, being careful to insert it in the same direction as the removed battery (or using the polarity marked on the holder or manual).
6. Reassemble the case and power.
7. Turn on the power. You will get the CMOS Checksum Bad error once more, but it should be the last time. Go into the BIOS setup and set the date and time, and any other options you prefer.

on May 30, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Main Bios Checksum Error!!!


Take notes of the BIOS settings of your computer for use after replacing the CMOS battery.

To access the computer's BIOS, restart your computer and press the "F 10" function key during the restarting process.


The BIOS configuration panel will then open and you can write the specific settings for your computer down to use for BIOS configuration after replacing the battery.


Turn off your computer and remove the power cable and if installed, battery.

Remove the computer hatch which will vary in method depending on the brand and model of computer you have.


On some motherboards cmos batteries are soldered in


Locate the CMOS battery on the motherboard.

The more popular model of CMOS battery used is annotated with a CR2032 label and is a round shaped button.


Firmly remove the CMOS battery from the motherboard.

Align the new CMOS battery with the positive side orientated towards you and insert into the mother board.


Restore the power cables to your computer and restart the PC.

During the restarting process, depress the "F10" function key to enter the BIOS setup screen.


Update the date in the BIOS and change the BIOS settings to match those you recorded in step one.


After the settings are updated, select the "Save and Quit" menu option and restart your computer to finish the CMOS battery replacement.


hope this helps




Sep 23, 2012 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Start-up and shut down problems, When starting up it says, press f1 to continue, f2 to run set-up.... F1 works but I am getting tired of doing this. Now when the computer starts, it stops at...


Hi names Rui,


For your problem the computer may display a prompt to press F1/F2 or any other key to enter setup each time the computer boots as a reminder on how to enter CMOS. However, if the computer asks to press F1/F2 (or another key) to enter setup and does not continue, this may be caused by any of the below reasons.

  1. New hardware has been recently installed.
  2. Error or confliction with settings in CMOS.
  3. CMOS battery is bad or failing.
Solution:

New hardware has been recently installed

If new hardware has been recently installed into the computer, it is likely that you are receiving the prompt "Press F1 or F2 to enter setup" because CMOS needs to verify that the new detected hardware is properly being setup in CMOS. Enter CMOS setup and save the settings and exit. If you continue to get errors continue to the next step.


Error or confliction with settings in CMOS

If no new hardware has been added or you continue to get this prompt verify no error or conflictions exist in CMOS. Press the key to enter setup and verify that all settings are correct.

If your time and date are not set correctly, your battery is more than likely bad. Try setting the correct time and date, save the settings and then reboot. If after turning off the computer the time and date get reset again replace the battery.

If the time and date are correct and everything else appears to be correct try resetting the CMOS values to the defaults.


CMOS battery is bad or failing

If you continue to receive the prompt to enter setup each time the computer boots up and you have attempted to follow the above suggestions, your CMOS battery is bad. We recommended that the CMOS battery be replaced.


hope this will help you.

Jul 20, 2011 | Dell Dimension 2400 PC Desktop

1 Answer

P5RD1-V BOOT PROBLEM


The CMOS, which stands for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor, is the hardware component of a computer that supports the BIOS, or basic input output system. The two terms are often used interchangeably, and the two technologies work together to perform the same basic function. They maintain the low-level settings on a computer, letting the computer know, even before the computer's operating system starts, what kinds of hardware the computer has available, such as hard drives and video display adapters. A special battery located on the computer's motherboard powers the CMOS. To reset the CMOS on a Dell computer, briefly remove and then replace the battery
  1. Turn off the computer. Disconnect all cables and detach all devices, including USB devices, from the computer. Press and hold the computer's power button for 10 seconds after it has been unplugged. This grounds the system board.
  2. Step 2 Remove the computer cover. All Dell systems have a cover panel on the chassis that you can remove so that you can access the system's motherboard and internal components. For some Dell computer lines, such as OptiPlex, the computer cover is held in place by a release latch located on the back of the computer. Pull the latch to release the cover and then slide the over up and away. Other lines, such as Dimension, have large, slotted thumbscrews. Turn the screws counter-clockwise until they disengage from the chassis, the slide the cover off the computer. Dell computers often ship with the computer's user guide in CD form or with the guide pre-loaded on the system's hard drive. You can locate the instructions for removing the cover from your particular system in the user guide.
  3. Step 3 Locate the CMOS battery on the system's motherboard. CMOS batteries range in size from size and thickness from about the size of a nickel to about the size of a quarter. The CMOS battery will generally be labeled CMOS on the motherboard and will be the only battery openly exposed on the motherboard.
  4. Step 4 Remove the CMOS battery by prying it gently up out of its socket. The sockets are specifically designed to allow the battery to be replaced.
  5. Step 5 Wait 30 seconds, and then replace the battery in its socket. This will reset the CMOS. Replace the computer cover to complete the process.
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Nov 14, 2009 | ASUS P5RD1-V Motherboard

2 Answers

MY LAPTOP(hp compaq presario v2000)BEEPS TWICE AND DISPLAYS PRESS F1 TO RESUME OR F2 TO SETUP!pls help


Hi, and welcome to FixYa
The computer may display a prompt to press F1/F2 or any other key to enter setup each time the computer boots as a reminder on how to enter CMOS. However, if the computer asks to press F1/F2 (or another key) to enter setup and does not continue, this issue can be caused by any of the below possibilities.
1. New hardware has been recently installed.
2. Error or confliction with settings in CMOS.
3. CMOS battery is bad or failing.
Solution:
New hardware has been recently installed
If new hardware has been recently installed into the computer, it is likely that you are receiving the prompt "Press F1 or F2 to enter setup" because CMOS needs to verify that the new detected hardware is properly being setup in CMOS.

Error or confliction with settings in CMOS
If no new hardware has been added to the computer or the new hardware has been removed and you continue to receive the error, it is likely that there is an error or confliction with the CMOS. Press the key requested to enter setup and verify that all settings are correct. If everything appears to be correct try resetting the CMOS values to the defaults and/or Reset Configuration Data. Additional information about how to do this can be found on document CH000976.
If all settings appear to be correct, save changes and exit CMOS setup. If the error continues to appear, enter setup again and restore all CMOS values to default.
· See our CMOS page for additional help and information with the CMOS.
· Additional information about getting into the CMOS / BIOS setup can be found on document CH000192.
CMOS battery is bad or failing
If you continue to receive the prompt to enter setup each time the computer boots up and you have attempted to follow the above suggestions, it is also possible that the CMOS battery may be bad or failing. Generally; when this occurs, the computer is not holding the time or date correctly. If this is occurring it is recommended that the CMOS battery be replaced.

regards
/Teis the Wiz - -> Vote "FixYa" :-)

Dec 05, 2008 | Computers & Internet

4 Answers

Cmos checksum bad...usb current status detected system shut down 15 sec


Situation Remedies If you have encountered this error and would like to fix your computer, here are some remedies for each situation:
CMOS Battery Not Functioning Properly: If you suspect your CMOS battery is not functioning properly you can easily change it. Before changing your battery, reboot your computer to make sure that the error still exists. If it does, go into your CMOS and write down all of the settings. If all settings are lost, you can usually get them from your computer manufacturer. Now locate the battery and remove it, you might need to consult your computers manual or tech support to remove your battery. Take down the CMOS batteries information such as volt, size, etc. Once you have your new battery, you can replace it and reenter your CMOS settings. If your battery was the cause of the CMOS Checksum Bad Error, you should have remedied the problem.
Your BIOS has Been Updated (either by you or possibly a virus): If your BIOS has been updated recently, your CMOS settings may have become reset. Make sure that the values entered in the BIOS are correct or simply reset them to the default settings. If you believe that a virus updated your BIOS settings, run a virus scan and make sure that the BIOS settings are back to the default.
The Computer Was Shut Down Improperly: Sometimes when running MS Windows, if you shut down your laptop or desktop without first properly shutting down your operating system it will corrupt the CMOS settings causing the CMOS Checksum Bad Error. You can easily avoid this error by making sure that you completely shut down your computer before turning off the power. Usually this entails going into the Start Menu/ Turn Off Computer/ Shut Down. If you received the error, shut down the computer properly, if this is the cause of the error, the error message will not return.

May 11, 2008 | ASUS M2N-MX Motherboard

2 Answers

The clock on my Fujitsu Siemens Scalio L computer loses time.How can i fix it?


There is a small cell battery which keeps some data like TIME running and CMOS settings saved...even if the computer is whiched off...Your battery is weak now...replace it with a new one...

May 10, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Zenith supersport 286e how to get to it


1moz-screenshot.jpgmoz-screenshot-1.jpgI can give you the basic idea of what you need to do.
I heard fro a guy who was NOT technical that he replaced the battery in a Zenith Superspot 286
(and it was not a problem)

If your computer is losing its time or date settings, or you are receiving a message:
CMOS Read Error,
CMOS checksum error, or
CMOS Battery Failure
first attempt to leave the computer on for 24 hours. In some cases this can charge the battery and resolve your issue. This often resolves CMOS battery related issues when a computer has been left off for several months.

If this does not resolve your issue follow the below steps.

Open the computer case and find the battery on the computer MotherBoard verify that it will be accessible and that it can be removed.
Most computers today use a coin 'cell' CMOS battery as shown in the image below.
Just know what you are looking for.
If it were like most it would look like this:
10c76b3.gif
But if not, ALL replacement batteries for the Zenith 286e on the market look like this:
4d0daf6.jpg
Here's some example and average specs
(so yes, 3.6 lithium is OK - to answer your 2nd question)

Price $15.75 each Warranty 12 MONTHS Chemistry67 Lithium Volts68 3.6 AmpHours69 0 Description Cylindrical cell with wires and 3 pin connector. Dimensions 1.34 x 1.34 x 0.65

You should be able to solve that.
If you need more specifics go here:

Apr 08, 2008 | Acer Aspire 5500 5570-2609 Laptop

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