Question about Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm Lens

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Beginner need some help please


I just bought my d200 with the image stabilizing 18-200 lense. I have shoot with it a handful of times now and have read half the manual trying to learn the basics. But I am not receiving the same quality as my cheaper old camera I sold to have a nicer product I now don't know how to work. Most of my shoots are coming out blurry. I have it on Auto and the shutter speed you can actually hear how slow it is taking. When I put my flash up it speeds up. But most of the time I don't need any flash because there is plenty of light.

Any ideas would help.

signed, looking for help

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There's absolutely nothing wrong with your camera. You simply need to learn about the basics. Read on the web about exposure, shutter speed, aperture, and how they affect each other. If your shots are blurry, the reason is that the shutter speed was too low.

How can you know when the shutter speed is too low?

- Use a tripod (the VR of the lens must be off in this case)
- Or, for hand-held shots, use shutter priority mode and set a speed as fast as the focal length of the lens. - i.e. for focal length of 100mm, a handheld shot must be taken at 1/100 sec or faster. Of course, the light might not be available for such a faster speed. The VR also gives you some latitude, but it's not panacea.

Additionally, DSLR cameras (esp. if you shoot RAW) produce images that are less saturated and contrasty compared to the blown out photos produced by point and shoot cameras.

You have a remarkable camera, just take your time and learn the basics of photography.

Posted on Jan 03, 2008

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hi

this error 99 is generally occured when the lense is not recognized

this has been a common problem reported

we'll clear the contacts and connect the lense

try turning the Image Stabilization off and this could solve your problem temporarily

hope this helps
cheers

pls reate the solution if this helped any

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Nikon D200 High Speed Performance
© 2006 KenRockwell.com Film vs. Digital About these reviews
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I bought mine from Ritz here. I bought another D200 from Adorama here. Also try Amazon here. Adorama usually has D200/18-70 kits in stock here. It helps me keep adding to this site when you click these links to get yours.
HIGH SPEED PERFORMANCE
General:
My D200 is fast, smooth and quiet. Unlike my D1H, my D200 makes less noise and vibration. It doesn't feel as macho, and allows me to shoot in more places more discreetly. At five frames per second it just hums along sweetly, compared to my bigger cameras which always felt like something was going to come flying off of them from all the clattering.
Buffers versus Memory Card Memory
The D200 uses two very different kinds of memory for storing images.
We're all familiar with the CF cards used to store hundreds of images. These aren't that fast and card makers rate them for write speed. The D200 uses these for recording your images.
The D200, like all professional digital cameras, has a second very high speed internal cache memory called a buffer. You never touch this. This buffer memory stores 25 frames of JPGs, 21 frames of raw or 19 frames of raw + JPG.
The buffer memory is fast enough to store all these frames at the full 5FPS rate, or faster.
The D200 is never slowed by memory speed card. The D200, like other professional cameras, has a second independent set of processors which handle writing the contents of the fast buffer memory to the slower CF card. Because this writing is done with a second set of processors you never know it's working except for the green CF light on the back. The D200 can be busy for over a minute writing to the CF card and you still have the complete ability to shoot at 5 FPS and play back.
The buffer is so deep that even under the heaviest shooting it's unlikely that you'll ever fill it. Even if you fill the buffer you can still make photos and playback, just that the maximum shooting rate will lower a bit until the buffer write and frees up at least one frame.
It takes it a 100 seconds to write 400 MB of data from 19 uncompressed RAW + Large FINE JPG files to my 40x 1GB Lexar card. As a photographer you don't care how long it takes to write. So long as the buffer isn't full the camera works as fast as ever. Even if it is full you can shoot the next shot as soon as the buffer clears enough room. You don't have to wait for everything to write to make a next shot. Even with my slow 40x lexar 1GB card, a constipated buffer and huge compressed raw + JPG Large Fine files I can make a new shot every 3.2 seconds. With uncompressed raw + JPG Fine Large I can get off a new shot with a full buffer every 3.7 seconds. If you ever get to these limits you're doing something stupid. Just shoot JPG and you'll never be able to fill up the buffer faster than you can shoot. With Large FINE Optimal Quality JPGs the buffer clears at the rate of 1 FPS. With Large Basic Optimal Quality JPGs I can run at 2 FPS even with a full buffer. Use the smaller image sizes or the Size Priority JPG setting and you can shoot as fast with the buffer full as empty!
I've had to do seriously stupid tests to fill it up.
Shot Buffer Readout
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Jan 27, 2008 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

Nikon D200


My first question would be what lens are you using - some lenses have auto stability features - please post lens make, type, model number and when you purchased it.

Dec 22, 2007 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

3 Answers

Nikon18-200mm lens


Are you referring to a lens that has the Vibration Reduction? These are the settings:
  • Normal - The image stabilization is on, but is for when you just hold the camera "still" by hand or are using a uni-pod.
  • Active - The image stabilization is REALLY on, it's for when you have a shaky hand, like in a car or boat, or no uni-pod and you need extra sensitivity to control shake.
I have the 70-200mm VS f2.8. Boy, it's great.

Hope this helps, if it does, please set to FixYa!

Nov 29, 2007 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

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