Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ7 Digital Camera

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Starry Sky When I try to take a starry sky picture in the 60 sec. mode, the stars look more like lines. I've checked and the tripod which I'm using isn't moving. Any ideas?

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Re: starry Sky

You need an equatorial mount tripod that can offset the earth movement. The tripod is motorised. Check on Telescope stores.
Astrophotography can only be achieved in this way. Otherwise you will see lines which are mark of stars through the time in relation to the earth
São Paulo, Brasil

Posted on Jan 03, 2008

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Re: starry Sky

The stars are moving!!! the earth is rotating slowly and the position of the stars as viewed from earth moves too.

Posted on Jan 01, 2008

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Images of stars in space

you will need to mount the camera on a tripod. then you need to set a long enough / slow enough shutter time to capture the stars faint light. the camera may even have a nightime setting. bear in mind that streetlights and other town lighting may make it difficult to get a good image of the night sky. maybe go to a state park or campground well away from city lights for a better effect.

Aug 14, 2014 | Digital Cameras

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Can anyone tell me how to set my camera up to capture shots of the Aurora Boreleas?

I don't think there is one correct setting.
There are several ways to find out what is best for your camera. Some (seamy) professional camera's can shoot to very high ISO settings, so they can take pictures in shorter times.
You should start with a good tripod, because your camera will need seconds in stead of tenths or hundreds of a second.
At home, set up your tripod with camera on a bright night. Try to make pictures of the sky with shutter times like 1, 10 and 30 seconds. Look on what picture you have a good contrast between the stars and the background. That should be the starting point when shooting the aurora. Get used to long shutter times and how the camera reacts, because saving a picture that took 10 seconds to take, will take another 10 seconds to save.
You also could look up some pictures from the Aurora Borealis on Dpreview or Flickr and see what the settings of the camera's were. Would be great if you found pictures made with the Canon Powershot SD600, but if nit, you still can see what you can expect .

Nov 08, 2013 | Canon PowerShot SD600 Digital Camera

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I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.

You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak C195 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I live in the Florida Keys and going to try and take some photos of the supper moon tonight. What settings do you suggest for a Sony SLT-A55V. I tried to use my longer lens last night without a tripod...

Take you camera off the automatic exposure setting. Left to itself, the camera will try to make the black sky a middle gray. You want to treat the moon as a landscape under noon sun. If you think about it, that's all it is. The moon is simply a large rock or mountain, lit by the same sun you get at noon. This is where the "Sunny-16" rule comes in. The proper exposure for a full moon is an aperture of f/16 and a shutter speed of 1/ISO. For example, if your ISO is set for 200, the shutter speed should be about 1/200 second. Any equivalent exposure will work as well, for example f/11 at 1/400. You can then review the picture on your display and adjust accordingly. The sky will go pure black, but that's okay. You're not taking a picture of the sky, but of the moon.

Mar 20, 2011 | Digital Cameras

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The flash on my camera will not turn on no matter what I do. The flash button won't bring up a flash menu or anything. Any suggestions?

Flash is deactivated in motion picture mode, scenery, night scenery, sunset, highsens, starry sky, fireworks or aerial photo in scene mode.

Jul 23, 2010 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Digital Camera

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I want to take pictures of The Northern Lights. What setting?

Correct, you don't want the flash.

Some cameras have a fireworks mode, Unfortunately, the SD400 doesn't. As far as I can tell, the SD400 doesn't even have a landscape mode, which would have been my second choice.

I'd start by turning off the flash in Auto mode. Unfortunately, the camera is going to try to make the night sky a medium gray. You'll have to reduce the exposure using the exposure compensation feature. Review your pictures and examine the histograms to fine-tune the exposure.

My other approach would be to use the manual mode, reviewing the images and histograms.

Either way, take lots of pictures. Feel free to experiment with various exposures. Remember, there is no "magic bullet." Your sky isn't going to look the same as mine, so my settings won't necessarily do you any good.

Feb 19, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SD400 / IXUS 50 Digital...

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Hi, i am Lata and the problem i face is the screen appears dark with circular dots resembling stars in the sky on a dark night. Images cannot be viewed and when i click there appear some horizontal lines....

hi, i am del and the problem i face is the screen appears dark with circular dots resembling stars in the sky on a dark night. images cannot be viewed and when i click there appear some horizontal lines. what could be the problem? Can you help please? Rgds del

Apr 21, 2009 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-T33 Digital Camera

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Can't Shoot At An Angle

What mode are you shooting in? If you are in almost any mode except M(anual), the camera may not be able to lock focus once you point it a relatively dark area of the sky. See if the Focus Confirmation light in the viewfinder is flashing. If it is, the shutter will not release. See page 162 in the manual for options, and page 71 for shooting Bulb exposures.

Apr 14, 2008 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Purple Tint Sky

auto white balance should work OK. I was thinking maybe you had accidentally switched it to the Fixed setting. Hmm. You said you were using Normal and Landscape modes. Just to see how it works, I would suggest switching from Program mode to Full Auto. See if that fixes your purple skies. I don't know why it would, but it is something to try

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

2 Answers

One of the pictures has a great blue sky but the green tree is very dark and the other one has the green tree and very bright sky?

The two pictures were shot at dramatically different exposures - the "dark" one at 1/1600 shutter speed, f7.3, the "light" one at 1/320 shutter speed, f4.0. This accounts for the great difference, as the exposure conditions for the "light" one allowed much more light into the image during the exposure period. You didn't tell the whole story of how you set this up, I think you were shooting in a "spot" metering mode, where the particular exposure conditions the camera uses would vary considerably whether you were aiming at a dark area (making the picture light) or a light area (making the picture dark). I would make two recommendations: Switch your metering mode to "center weighted" (the mode labeled "[(•)]"), and also change your ISO setting to AUTO, as there would be no reason for shooting these photos at ISO 200 that I can think of.

Sep 04, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

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