Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-LZ7 Digital Camera

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Starry Sky When I try to take a starry sky picture in the 60 sec. mode, the stars look more like lines. I've checked and the tripod which I'm using isn't moving. Any ideas?

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You need an equatorial mount tripod that can offset the earth movement. The tripod is motorised. Check on Telescope stores.
Astrophotography can only be achieved in this way. Otherwise you will see lines which are mark of stars through the time in relation to the earth
Henrique
São Paulo, Brasil

Posted on Jan 03, 2008

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The stars are moving!!! the earth is rotating slowly and the position of the stars as viewed from earth moves too.

Posted on Jan 01, 2008

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Venturer Tv to Sky


It sounds like your TV is on the wrong input. Look for a button that says input or source. Depending on the TV this will either provide an onscreen menu to select an input or it will simply scroll through the inputs. Turn on the Sky box and run through the inputs until you see something that looks like your Sky Box.

Jul 26, 2013 | Televison & Video

Tip

You Just Bought an EQUATORIAL Telescope Mount!


Even though we warned you not to do this, you bought one anyway! Beginners should never buy an EQ telescope mount as their first telescope. It's too late now; so I guess we will need to teach you how to use it!

Equatorial mounts move in a way that seems not to very intuitive. Unlike the easy Alt AZ mount which moves up and down and left and right, the EQ mounted telescope seems to move in TWO dissimilar directions at the same time.

Additionally you must first polar align the mount on the North star Polaris before you can use it. SEE! we told you not to buy it!

Here are the steps to roughly polar align the telescope so you can use it. If it is motorized the single Right Ascension motor will keep the sky object inside the eyepiece for long periods of time. If you do not have a Right Ascension motor, the slow motion RA knob can be slowly turned to keep the sky object centered in the eyepiece.

Begin by leveling the mount and tripod. Move the entire mount and tripod so it is pointing roughly to North, as close as possible using the steps below or a compass. Don't forget to adjust for your magnetic deviation. My location's compass reading is about 5 degrees away from true North. This is called magnetic deviation. You can find your location's deviation on the internet. Then proceed with the steps below.

First, adjust the Declination to the latitude for your observing site. Declination is the angle that the scope is pointing UP, and it's the same as your latitude. For example Dallas, Texas is about 32 degrees North latitude, adjust the scope so the small indicator reads 32 degrees. By the way, the North star in Dallas, TX is about 32 degrees above the horizon. Your latitude matches the elevation of Polaris (the North star) above the horizon.

Second, either look through the polar alignment scope buried in the axis of the telescope mount, or look along side the axis, and get the star Polaris lined up in the cross-hair of the polar alignment scope, or as best you can by looking along the side of the mount axis, or lining it up using your compass.. This will put the scope to within about 3/4 of 1 degree of the TRUE North celestial sphere. This is good enough for VISUAL observation, but NOT good enough to do astro-photography..

Adjust the DECLINATION up or down, and move the entire mount left or right until you can see Polaris as indicated above, or it is lined up as close as possible.

Now you are roughly polar aligned. Now you can move the tube around by loosening the Right Ascension lock, and or the Declination lock until your sky object appears in the small finder scope mounted on top of the main telescope tube.(DO NOT MOVE THE MOUNT, and the counter weight should never be higher than the telescope tube) Lock down the scope in both axis and use the fine adjustment RA and DEC knobs to center the target. Again, DO NOT move the mount or tripod. The mount should still be pointing at Polaris.

This web site illustrates this procedure:
http://www.astronomy.net/articles/4/polaralign.html

also this web site

http://www.telescopes.com/telescopes/polaralignmentarticle.cfm

You should be able to keep an object within the field of view of the eyepiece by slowing turning the Right Ascension slow motion control knob-------- IF you are actually accurately polar aligned. Small adjustments may also be needed with the DEC slow motion knob since you are not exactly polar aligned using this rough alignment technique.

However it can be used successfully for visual observation. Your scope will now track the motion of the stars as they move across the sky.

Hope that helps you!

Clear Skies!
TelescopeMan

www.telescopeman.tumblr.com

on Dec 29, 2009 | Optics

2 Answers

I would like to be able to take a good picture of a full moon on a clear night.


You're going to face two separate problems here.

One, the moon occupies a rather small portion of the night sky. Even fully zoomed in, the moon is going to be not much more than a bright spot in the sky.

Two, the camera is designed to assume that almost every scene is an average brightness. Given how much of the scene is a black sky, the camera will attempt to render the sky as average (what photographers call a "medium gray"). This will result in a picture with a gray sky and a featureless white blob for the moon.

If you think about it, the full moon is nothing more than a really big rock under a midday sun. Thus what you want is the same exposure as when taking a picture on a clear sunny day. Unfortunately the camera is going to be fooled by all that dark sky and try to compensate for it. What you really need is to be able to bypass the camera's light meter and set the proper exposure yourself. The C195, unlike more sophisticated cameras, doesn't allow you to do so. Sorry, but that's just the way it is.

Mar 24, 2013 | Kodak C195 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Hello my name is greg i have a lx200-acf from my dad when he passed away do not no howto use it ?


This is a great scope. I have a much smaller version :)
1. Take it out on some dark night. 2. Let it auto-align 3. Select something to look at using the AutoStar II 4. Press Go.
Gander at the wonders of the universe.
In the AutoStar, there is a program called Sky Tour. This will pick some things out for you.
Start with a "wide" eyepiece - to see more of the sky. Work your way to high powers as you need or as sky conditions permit.
Goto a few local "star parties".

Jun 02, 2011 | Meade 12 Inch LX200ACF Advanced Coma Free...

1 Answer

The flash on my camera will not turn on no matter what I do. The flash button won't bring up a flash menu or anything. Any suggestions?


Flash is deactivated in motion picture mode, scenery, night scenery, sunset, highsens, starry sky, fireworks or aerial photo in scene mode.

Jul 23, 2010 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ8 Digital Camera

2 Answers

How to use telescope at night?


Many people have the same problem-- with these small telescopes you are stuck with seeing only the moon, and several other planets, and maybe a few bright star clusters.

These are all TINY objects (except for the moon).... when you look through the telescope you are looking at a section of sky about the size of your fingertip held at arms length-- the scope must be pointed DIRECTLY at the object. Practice on the moon first-- and then try to find Saturn which is up in the sky right now-- it looks like a dim (slightly yellow) star.

Download a free star chart at www.skymaps.com ---

Apr 01, 2009 | Edu-Science (10166) Telescope

2 Answers

LX200 EMC MEADE 8 INCH


By doing this trick--

Do a FAKE alignment-- (I assume that the scope is trained and has the proper date, time, and site)-- just push the buttons for the alignment stars that you cannot see. Then do a GOTO to a star that is in your field of view--- center the star and SYNC. Your gotos will now be OK in your limited field of view.

Jan 30, 2008 | Meade LX200R 8 in. (600 x 203mm) Telescope

1 Answer

Tv wont switch to Sky when remote control is pressed


Hi.
On the sky box do the following.

Check scart to tv is in the correct socket marked TV.
Try pressing services
then system setup
then picture settings.
Then try switching scart control to on or off.
If this sorts it great. If it doesnt check scart lead has all pins wired & not only A few.

http://dysonmanuals.llc.nu

Chris..

Jan 19, 2008 | Televison & Video

1 Answer

Zoom


All goto scopes require you to do an alignment on 2 or 3 stars in the night sky-- or they will not find anything. Also the time, date, and site must be accurate-- and the tripod must be perfectly level.

Read the manual again-- and perform all of the setup steps. You can download a monthly star chart here for free:
http://skymaps.com/downloads.html

The alignment stars are ALWAYS the brightest stars in the sky and the first ones you can see when it starts getting dark.


www.telescopeman.org
www.telescopeman.info
www.telescopeman.us

Dec 21, 2007 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8890 (300 x 90mm)...

1 Answer

Purple Tint Sky


auto white balance should work OK. I was thinking maybe you had accidentally switched it to the Fixed setting. Hmm. You said you were using Normal and Landscape modes. Just to see how it works, I would suggest switching from Program mode to Full Auto. See if that fixes your purple skies. I don't know why it would, but it is something to try

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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