Question about Norton Password Manager 2004 (10109252) for PC

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Vista Upgrade I just bought a new Computer with windows vista and I am tryin to move Norton Password mamager over from my old XP system. Is this possiable? If not how can I retrieve my passwords manually so I can access all my programs? Thank You for your time. Biggben0077@yahoo.com

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  • Biggben Dec 26, 2007

    not helping but thanks anyway

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Use a software called PC Mover

Posted on Dec 26, 2007

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Hello, I would take off the norton, and put on AVG, its free
http://free.grisoft.com/ Farren

Posted on Dec 26, 2007

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3 Answers

Software upgrade


Hi!

Well, win xp is absolutly more fun as OS then win 2000:)
To upgrade to win xp will be no problem since Toshiba have drivers for ir. To upgrade to VISTA will...or can give you problem since there arent any drivers for that Tecra S1.

If u deside to upgrade to win xp, here is all the drivers u gona need to do it:
http://www.csd.toshiba.com/cgi-bin/tais/support/jsp/modelContent.jsp?ct=DL&os=&category=&moid=380605&rpn=PT831U&modelFilter=S1&selCategory=3&selFamily=1073768664&selModel=380605%7CPT831U

Good luck
Dont forget to RATE me

Nic

Mar 12, 2009 | Toshiba Tecra S1 Notebook

Tip

Windows Installation Disc VS Windows Upgrade Disc -NOT THE SAME-


Having Trouble Booting To Your Windows Upgrade Disc?

...Upgrade discs aren't bootable discs. To repair a windows installation, you must use either a system repair disc or, better yet, a windows installation disc (genuine Retail/OEM discs are pretty much your only option to completely reinstall your windows operating system, unless you own a previous full installation disc of a previously released Windows version (such as XP or Vista), in which case you could install that windows operating system and then upgrade to a newer windows OS like windows 7. however if you ever need to reinstall windows 7, you would either need to reinstall the older windows OS, then upgrade to the newer one.

If that isn't clear, I'll sum it up....

Let's say you bought a computer, that computer had windows xp home edition. Maybe you wanted to upgrade from Windows XP/Windows Vista or Windows 7?
Well in order to switch from Windows XP/Vista to Windows 7, (or even from Windows 7 home premium- to windows7 Pro or Ultimate), then you must either:
A) Buy an upgrade disc and upgrade to the newer desired version.
B) Or, Buy a Retail Copy of the version you want to install. (keep in mind that a retail Windows 7 disc can be used to perform an upgrade rather than to competely wipe the hard disc and perform a clean install (delete partitions, reformat, and perform a new windows installation), if you so choose.

The bottom line is, you cannot Install a fresh clean copy of windows using an upgrade disc. OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) and Retail Windows Operation System Installation Setup Discs are "Bootable Discs". Windows Upgrade Discs are NOT bootable. (unless one where to "modify that particular disc, which is not legal).

on Jul 06, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

I have two problems with my HP compaq 6830s running VIsta business SP2 1) My inbuilt web cam stopped to work, and i have tried to uninstall and reinstall drivers with no luck. 2)The wireless card,...


If you upgrade your operating system like from windows xp to windows vista, you need to install new hardware driver for your computer like for LAN, webcam, WAN and others because the old driver is only compatible with the old operating system and not with VISTA operating system. Solution would are, download webcam and WAN driver for Windows Vista and install it into your computer. Don't just upgrade your computer because the configuration is not the same with the old operating system. If problem still exist, just upgrade the service pack from 2 to 3. There is available install for upgrading the service pack of each operating system. and surely all your hardwares will function.

Dec 29, 2010 | HP Compaq 6830s Laptop

1 Answer

Windows


If your computer meets the hardware compatibility requirements,

purchase Windows Vista Home Basic 32-Bit at this link for under

$90.00. Install it as an upgrade and your existing files will be moved

to a folder named Windows.old. If you choose to upgrade bear in

mind that Vista puts your system resources under a heavier load

so you may want to add more memory to your machine.

Nate P.

Mar 03, 2009 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

3 Answers

I intalled windows vista on my laptop but i cant get any sound driver to work with it


I have an HP DV1150US, and just bought a Toshiba M305D, 64 bit dual core AMD laptop with Vista. You are actually "Downgrading" by going to Vista, your DV machine doesn't have the CPU power or memory (unless you spent several hundred dollars to bump up the RAM).   If you bought the software with a credit card, return it (they will say you can't, but make them "receive" it ) as defective (Vista is defective as it doesn't support tons of things that work in XP, there is no legitimate technical reason for this) and then arbitrate with your credit card company to get the charge for the software refunded. If everyone did this, then MicroSoft would not produce such incompatible software. The public has had the wool pulled over their eyes ... if you bought a toaster, and it made beautiful toast 39 out of 40 times ... and in 1 out of 40 times, the bread came out on fire ... you'd return it right?  Vista'=flaming bread about 3% of the time.
I have used literally dozens of OS in 30 years as a software professional, and I can say with confidence, that your problems with Vista are just beginning.  You may be happy with Vista and the tens upon tens of hours it takes to get productive again IF and only IF you are a serious Microsoft zealot.
Look at what millions of other users say about moving from XP to Vista.  Microsoft has a policy for Corporate customers only, that if they buy an Vista machine,  they have rights to change (really upgrade) to XP for free (look it up).   
If you stick with Vista, you are on a never ending MicroSoft treadmill to buy new hardware that works with your new OS, then be forced into another new operating system (MS will drop support for Vista and force you to Windows 7 faster than a hot potato)  when they refuse to support Vista read:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_7.
If you stick with Vista and have any significant investment in prior software ... you are going to have to replace a portion of it.  My 4 year old $600 Office XP Pro package for one ... doesn't work on Vista!!!
If you have to have Vista,  you can resurrect your XP OS and install Sun's FREE VirtualBox and run Vista as a "Guest Operating System" within XP !!!   Then you can "play" with Vista to your hearts content, and when you really need something to work (read: your hardware or your existing software), you can use the native XP.    Oh yeah ... you are going to need a new machine to do this, but you would need that for Vista anyway.   For $700 at BestBuy, you can get a Toshiba M305D with 2 Core 64 Bit AMD CPU, 4GB Ram and Vista Premium aldeady installed 160GB or so drive ... much less that it would cost you to upgrade your DV1000 for just the RAM and Drive.  
Sincerely, A. Mayers Programmer / Power user - 30 years experience

Oct 29, 2008 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

3 Answers

WIndows Vista to XP Pro


Owners of the OEM editions of Vista Business and Vista Ultimate can downgrade to Windows XP Professional, including Tablet PC Edition and x64 Edition. Only the OEM editions qualify for a downgrade, so if you purchased a new PC with either Business or Ultimate preinstalled, you're in like Flynn.

Those who aren't: All users of Vista Home Basic and Vista Home Premium, and anyone who upgraded to Vista using a retail edition of any of the operating system's SKUs. You are, as they say, SOL.

How do I downgrade? Install a copy of Windows XP Professional with the product key that came with the copy, and then when you hit the activation screen -- which is near the end of the installation process -- select the activate by phone option rather than the online method. You'll likely end up talking with a live rep; tell him that you're downgrading from Vista to XP, and give him the Vista product key. The rep is supposed to walk you through the rest.

Where do I get the XP install disc? Until this summer, Microsoft put the responsibility on the end users' shoulders. For example, in this Vista downgrade rights document (download PDF) targeting resellers, the company said "media is provided by the customer."

A few months ago, however, Microsoft relaxed, and began allowing resellers to provide Windows XP setup CDs to customers buying Vista Business- and Ultimate-equipped PCs. In some cases, discs are shipped with the PCs; in others, users must request them. Don't bother calling Microsoft; it won't provide installation media, and will instead direct you to your reseller.



If the computer maker won't send a Windows XP Pro disc, you're on your own. While perhaps not easy, getting your hands on the install media isn't impossible. Any copy of Windows XP Professional will do -- it doesn't matter if it's already been installed and/or whether the license is in use -- as long as you can find its product key. Install it (see "How do I downgrade?" above) using that key, then activate over the phone with the Vista key.

As a last resort, buy a copy. This isn't a downgrade, not as Microsoft defines it, but it's what most users think of when they use the term.

What can I do if I don't have downgrade rights? Nothing is stopping you from punting to XP other than the money invested in the Vista license already on the PC and what it will cost to replace it. The total may be inconsequential to some, a deal-breaker for others. But there are options.

Because you're paying for the swap, you can switch to any flavor of XP. Windows XP Home, for instance, typically sells online for between $50 and $90 less than Professional. Windows XP Media Center is usually priced between the two.

Once you pick an edition, you can choose from OEM, upgrade and full product versions, which are priced in that order, lowest first. OEM, often called "system builder," omits support and can only be installed on one machine, ever. Windows XP Home OEM is sold online at for around $90. The upgrade version, which runs about $100, can be installed, removed and installed on another PC, but requires proof that you own a legitimate copy of an older operating system. You don't need to install that predecessor, only insert its CD at some point during the XP installation. Eligible versions for an XP upgrade include Windows 98, Windows 98 SE and Windows Millennium.

Finally, there's the most expensive option: the full edition, which sells for around $190. No earlier Windows version is necessary to install this, and like the upgrade, it can be transferred later to another PC.

Of course, the most affordable downgrade is one using the XP installation CD you saved when you upgraded that well-worn machine of yours to Vista earlier this year. You did save it, right? If you didn't get an install disc with that box when you bought it -- and some vendors don't bother, instead slapping restore files in a hidden partition on the hard drive, which has been, of course, copied over by Vista -- you may be able to pry one from the reseller. Dell owners, for instance, can use an online form to request one free copy of the install CD.

I have XP and I'm ready to downgrade. Now what? From here, a downgrade is just like any clean install. You'll need to back up data files, record and/or copy settings and passwords, and make sure you have installation files and/or discs for the applications you'll reinstall in XP. If you've upgraded to software suitable for Vista, it's likely that the newer programs will also run under XP. Copying data and the application installation files you've downloaded from the Web is easiest if you plug in an external drive.


There aren't any downgrade utilities to do the kind of work that upgrade, or migration tools, provide when you're moving up in the world, operating system-wise, so don't bother looking for them. Pity.

Any caveats? Although Vista has been out for less than a year, that's plenty of time for change. If you bought a machine preinstalled with Vista, make sure there are XP drivers for the PC, its components and any new peripherals before you downgrade. Check the computer maker's site. If you find any major holes, reconsider.

I'm lazy but still want to downgrade. What are my options? If you're fed up with Vista, but not so sick of it that you're ready to face a complete mulligan on the operating system, virtualization might be for you. Add virtualization machine software on the Vista-running PC, create a VM, then install XP into the VM. You'll still need a licensed copy of Windows XP to be legit. Fortunately, unlike Vista, XP's EULA doesn't forbid virtualization. (Only Vista Business and Ultimate, the downgrader's friends, can be legally run in a virtual environment.)

You really have three picks here, including Microsoft's own Virtual PC 2007 (free), SWsoft's Parallels Workstation ($50) and VMware Inc.'s VMware Workstation ($189).

The biggest bonus in going virtual is that if you change your mind -- again -- and decide Vista isn't so bad after all, you can just delete the VM and have your old, or new, machine back.

Apr 10, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

1 Answer

Upgrading windows xp to vista


You can upgrade from your current edition of Microsoft Windows XP or Windows 2000 to a corresponding or better edition of Windows Vista by purchasing and installing an upgrade copy of Windows Vista.
While selecting the edition of Windows Vista that's right for you, it's important to clearly understand what hardware your PC will need to ensure the features you want will run reliably.

Nov 16, 2007 | Computers & Internet

4 Answers

Demo problem


If you have installed vista as a multiboot sytem, then you can do the below: Otherwise you have to do as tom19511 said:

Uninstall Windows Vista on a multiboot system
Applies to all editions of Windows Vista.

You cannot uninstall Windows Vista. However, you can change the code that starts the operating system (often called the master boot code), and then remove Windows Vista from your multiboot system and return to Windows XP or Windows 2000. You will need your Windows Vista installation disc for this procedure.

Before you begin, back up your programs, files, and settings. Removing Windows Vista is an advanced procedure that could result in losing information stored on your computer. For information about backing up data, search Help and Support for "back up."

1) Insert the Windows Vista installation disc.
2) Click the Start button getopencontent.aspx?assetid=4f6cbd09-148c-4dd8-b1f2-48f232a2fd33&documentset=en-us&renderkey=xml, click All Programs, click Accessories, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. getopencontent.aspx?assetid=18abb370-ac1e-4b6b-b663-e028a75bf05b&documentset=en-us&renderkey=xml If you are prompted for an administrator password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
3) Type [DVD drive letter]:\boot\bootsect.exe /nt52 ALL /force and then press ENTER.
For example, if the DVD drive letter is F, type f:\boot\ bootsect.exe /nt52 ALL /force.
4) Eject the Windows Vista installation disc.
5) Restart your computer.
Your computer will start in the previous version of Windows that you have installed.
6) Delete Windows Vista files and folders, such as the Program Files, Users, and Windows folders, manually.

Note: You can also remove Windows Vista by reformatting the partition where it is installed, but do this only if that partition is not the boot partition. Reformatting the boot partition might make your computer unable to start.

Nov 14, 2007 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

Windows vista!!! wont work


Vista is your problem You will have to go to the Ilo web site for vista drivers- if there is not one then yup your name fits.

Jul 31, 2007 | iLO (2 GB) MP3 Player

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