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Converting in order to Resizing an NTFS partition...


I keep hearing about using Diskpart.exe to make my partioned drive bigger. However, I also learned, in order to use this tool I should have FAT not NTFS.

Is it possible to convert the NTFS to FAT and then use the diskpart.exe tool? Then, once I've increased the size of my partition can I simply convert the FAT back to NTFS?

Or does it even matter which one I have?

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Re: Converting in order to Resizing an NTFS partition...

The only way to make your partion bigger is too merge your partitions.

The way the partition is formatted. (ie. FAT, FAT32, NTFS, etc) allows for information to stored differently. These file allocation tables use different size slots to store the information in. When you install a new program, the data is put into the first empty slot on the drive, and if there too much data for 1 slot, it uses the next available empty slot and so on until all the data is stored. If the last bit of data is just a couple of bites. The remaining space is unusable for any other program, thus wasting space.

When you delete a program, those slots are emptied and the next time you install something, it is stored in the first available empty slot. SInce most programs are not the same size, your drive soon becomes fragmented and this slows down the way the OS is able to retrieve information. (That's why defraging is a good thing.)

So using smalller allocated table sizes makes more efficient storage (less wastage of space) but on large drives this also makes for slower retrieval times and makes the OS work harder.

But to answer your question, you cannot easily convert NTFS to FAT,and I don't understand why you'd want to go to FAT from NTFS anyway. NTFS has much better security (FAT has none) and is more efficient than FAT.

But to convert to FAT you would need to do the following:


Then delete the partition that you wish to convert. This is done by going into Disk Management: right click "My Computer" -> Manage -> Disk Management, which is found under the Storage section. Right click the partition you wish to remove, and click "Delete Volume". This will erase the partition. Once you have done this, you must re-create the partition. This is done by right clicking on an unallocated region of a disk, and selecting "Create Partition". Then click "Create Logical Drive". Bear in mind that Windows cannot format a FAT32 partition that is any larger than 32GB. This is the case because FAT32 is terribly inefficient on volumes that are larger than 32GB: fragmentation becomes a serious problem.

To format this new volume, right click it, and choose Format. Again, if the volume you wish to format is larger than 32GB, FAT32 will not be one of the options available to you in the drop-down box. You will have to create multiple partitions if you want to format a large drive as FAT32. (Oops, there goes the reason you were doing this in the first place)

You would be better off just leaving it alone, and if you must have a bigger drive, either buy a larger drive, or merge 2 partitions. (Using the above method to do so)

Hope that helps.

Posted on Dec 25, 2007

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I want to install ubuntu and Mandiva, my question how to Install both operating systems? Thanks

The answer is yes, and no.
Both Mandriva and Ubuntu are Linux based and they do have
similarities and differences. The differences in how things run
may cause you problems, so the easy answer is no. There are
similarities that can be shared, and in this case, you have a

Since you mention XP and Ubuntu halves above, I'll assume you
have your harddrive split in only 2 partitions, perhaps or
preferably 3 partitions, such as.
hda1 = C: = XP ntfs (maybe 15 to 40 GB in size)
hda5 = extended partion which holds Ubuntu and swap
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First, we begin by describing your hard drive geometry.
When IBM compatible PC computers came into existence, the hard
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There were additional limitations, but based on you
describing "halves", your computer does not have the 1024
cylinder problem of long-ago and you are running a more modern
computer with a modern BIOS.

XP does want to be the 1st operating system on the 1st
enabled "primary" partition, so let us leave that as it is since
linux is more flexible and can be put on the extended partitions.

From a linux perspective, the primary reserved definitions would
be 1,2,3,4 (XP will me located in one of these 1..4) and the
extended partitions are 5 to define the partition, then
6,7,8,9.... (your Ubuntu will be located on one of these 6...).

Due to some very old software having had problems in the past,
you will want try to keep within the boundaries of 6,7,8,9 to
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In linux, you may note that your hard drive is described as hda
or perhaps sda and a number.
If you type at the command line fdisk /dev/hda and then
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I'll assume you do not know about moving and remounting
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If you have not done anything particularly important on your
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things, then make a backup of what you want to keep and put those
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install Mandriva. We want to avoid some complicated moves later.

I prefer to backup my machine before causing some major changes
such as these, it is strongly recommended you find a method to
backup your computer at the hard drive "image" level so you can
recover from a disaster if something goes wrong. this may help if
you have another computer available with sufficient hard drive
space. Substitute windows "share" instead of Samba if the other
computer is windows based.
If the above does not work for you, just make sure you make a
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With your Ubuntu install CDrom divide and install your Ubuntu
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hda1 = C: = XP ntfs (maybe 15 to 40 GB in size)
hda5 = extended partion which holds Ubuntu and swap
hda6 = home = Ubuntu (to share with Mandriva, make it
sufficiently large)
hda7 = = Ubuntu (maybe 4 GB or bigger, does not have home)
hda8 = empty partition (same size as hda7 - not defined)
hda9 = swap (approximately 2x the size of your RAM)

I recommend in the order above since you should rarely if ever
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to change and modify everything in between your /home and /swap
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Next, get your Mandriva CDrom install disk, and begin installing
it, during install, you want to re-use the existing Ubuntu /home
and existing Ubunt /swap partitions, so you indicate during
hda1 = C: = XP ntfs (maybe 15 to 40 GB in size)
hda5 = extended partion which holds Ubuntu and swap
hda6 = home = Mandriva (to share with Ubuntu)
hda7 = leave as undefined (it is your existing Ubuntu ""
hda8 = = Mandriva
hda9 = swap (approximately 2x the size of your RAM)

The values 1,6,7,8,9 may not be the same as they are assigned by
the partitioning tool, but the locations on the disk should be in
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similar tools too. After finishing, run XP and do a command-line
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made to XP's partition.

You should now have XP, Ubuntu and Mandriva with a shared /home
partition and a shared /swap partition. thanks

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