Question about Honeywell Electronic Programmable Heat/Cool Thermostat - CT3300A100 Heater

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I'm having a difficult time wiring the thermostat to work with the optional 24 vac.It's working now with the battery but I would like to connect with the 24 vac. I have four wires the orange wire is connected to y. the black wire is connected to G. The white wire is connected to W. The last wire which is red is connected to R. The Manuel instructs that in order to have the optional 24 vac you need to connect a wire to C.I HAVE NO MORE WIRES COMING OUT. How do I make this connection. thanks abe

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You cannot without a 5th wire.

Posted on Oct 06, 2009

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I have 4 wires from my old analog thermostat. Red, blue, white, and green


Look closely at the wire terminal screws on the thermostat. There are raised letters telling you what color wire to connect to it. be careful not to touch the red wire to the others. You can blow the internal fuse on the 24 VAC transformer that supplies the voltage to the thermostat.

Mar 07, 2016 | Honeywell RTH221B 1 Week Programmable...

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Color code for theromstat


Wiring Examples and Instructions
How-To-Wire-It.com
Basic or Common Connection Points
Terminal Colour Signal-Type Description C Black 24 Vac Common Common side of 24 Vac Transformer See Diagram below R or V red 24 Vac Transformer Power Power side of 24 Vac Transformer See diagram below RH or 4 red 24 Vac for heat 24 Vac power before heat switch see diagram below Rc Red 24 Vac for cool 24 Vac power before cool switch see diagram below Y Yellow switched power (cooling) Signal to turn on cooling system see diagram below W White Switched power (heating) Signal to turn on heating system see diagram below G Green Switched power for fan Signal to turn on fan (forced air) see diagram below
Heat Pumps/Multi-Stage Units
Terminal Colour Signal-type Description Y2 Can vary Switched power (2nd stage cooling) 2nd stage cooling signal to compressor W2 Can vary Switched power (2nd stage heating) 2nd stage heating/ sometimes used as emergency heat E Can vary Emergency heat enable Dedicated emergency heat 0 Orange Reversing value Reversing dynamics of the heat pump ----

Nov 22, 2015 | Honeywell Digital Round Thermostat,...

1 Answer

I installed a goodman 5 ton heat cool unit and a 5 wire battery operated tstat, the unit is 2 stage will it work with this tstat cant get anything to work even jumping the tstat


See if there is 124 VAC across the common and the red wire. If not then the thermostat transformer inside the unit will have to be replaced or the fuse changed if it has one(not likely).All t/stats are not the same. If your T/stat doesn't have a provision for the 2nd stage or emergency heat then you have the wrong T/stat That will definitely blow the transformer that supplies 24 vac to the control relays

Nov 15, 2015 | Goodman Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

Where is the low voltage 24 vac transformer located?


The transformer is located in the furnace. You might want to check to make sure the furnace door is on correctly brcause theres a swich that will open for safety . Also some have a fuse on the solid state board.

May 26, 2014 | Rheem RASL024JEC-RHPNHM2421JC 2 Ton 18.50...

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Mitsubishi aircon has e5 come up. whats the problem


e5- Remote control transmission error. Check wire correctly. Touch one of each of thevoltmeter probes to the terminals marked "R" and "C," tocheck for 24 volts of alternating current (24 VAC). If you do not get a voltagereading of 24 VAC, then the thermostat is not getting power. Reset the circuitbreaker, or check for a blown fuse, and replace if need. Use the voltmeter torecheck for 24 VAC between the terminals. If the thermostat still lacks power,check and reset any tripped condensate float switches. Check the power switchon the HVAC equipment and set to the "On" position, if necessary.Replace any broken wires and tighten any loose wire connections to restorepower to the thermostat.Wait five minutes and allow the system to respond.Thanks.

Jan 31, 2011 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I paid $20 last night to talk to someone. He told me how to hook up the Lux DMH110 but when i hooked it up this morning the heater came on when i put it on COOL and the fan just come on when i put it on...


If you have this type of system your thermostat will not work;
  • Multi-Stage Heat Pumps
  • 3 Wire Hydronic Systems
  • Line Voltage Systems (120/240 VAC)

  • This thermostat is only for this type of HVAC systems;
  • Most 24V Heating and A/C Systems
  • 1 Stage Heat/1 Stage Cool: Gas, Oil, Electric, or Single Stage Heat Pump Systems
  • 2 Wire Heat Only Hydronic Systems (Hot Water Baseboard & Radiator)
  • Millivolt Systems (Wall Heaters / Furnaces & Gas Fireplaces)

    1. Never connect a low voltage thermostat to line voltage.
    Two wires control a heat only system.
    1. Connect one wire to W and the other to RH.
    Two wires control a cool only system.
    1. Connect one wire to RC and the other to Y.
    Three wires for forced air heat only system, where the previous thermostat
    did not have a clock or timer.
    1. The previous RH or RC wire is the 24-volt transformer wire. Connect it to RH. Leave jumper connecting RH to RC. Connect the forced air heat system to W, and the fan wire to G.
    Three wires for a heat only, forced
    water system that did NOT have a
    clock or timer.
    1. This system employ 3 wire zone valves. Currently no Lux controls are compatible with this system.
    Three wires control a heat only, forced water system that DID have a clock or timer.
    1. Tape off and do NOT install any clock or timer wire. Often they are labeled C or TC. Install the remaining two wires, one to RH and the other to W.
    Four wires control a heat only system,
    and two of the wires operate clock or timer. The other two wires operate the heater.
    1. Tape off and do NOT install any clock or timer wire. Often they are labeled C or TC. Install the remaining two wires, one to RH and the other to W. The jumper connecting RH to RC may remain or be removed.
    Two wires control heating AND cooling.
    1. Currently no Lux controls are compatible with this system.
    Three wires control heating and cooling. One wire operates heat, one operates cooling and the third provides 24 VAC.
    1. Connect the 24-volt power wire to RH. Install a jumper connecting RH to RC. This jumper is usually pre-wired. connect the heat wire to W, and the cooling wire to Y.
    Three wires control a cooling only system. One wire operates the compressor, one operates the fan and the third provides
    24 VAC.
    1. Connect the 24-volt power wire to RC. Connect the cooling wire to Y and the fan wire to G.
    Four wires control a heating and cooling, electric, gas or oil, forced air system that
    is NOT a heat pump.
    1. Connect the 24 VAC transformer wire to RH or RC. Install a jumper connecting RH to RC This jumper is often prewired. Connect the heat wire to W, the cooling wire to Y. and the fan wire to G.
    Four wires control a Single Stage Heat Pump. They were labeled: G, Y, R or
    RH or RC, With either B or was used.
    1. Do not connect wires to both B and O. Connect the reversing valve wire to B or O, just as the previous thermostat. Install a jumper wire from RH to RC. Connect 24 VAC wire to RH too. Install a second jumper wire from W to Y. Connect compressor wire to Y and the fan wire to G.
    More than 4 wires are connected to the
    old thermostat

    Jun 27, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

    1 Answer

    My cooling and heat pump quit working and the fan outside does not come on. If you push in the contactor in the fan comes on and sounds like the compasator does to.


    Check the voltage at the contactor where the 24 vac connects to the coil for the contactor so you can see if it is making it that far. It will be 2 smaller wires that are not connected to the 240 vac. Let me know if you have 24 vac there. The thermostat will have to be calling for air for the 24 vac to be present. let me know what you find.

    May 05, 2010 | Intertherm P3RA-060K Air Conditioner

    1 Answer

    Hooking up the thermostat


    Typically thermostats only have connections for two wires. All the switching and power control is done in the unit not the thermostat. A thermostat normally runs on low voltage, about 24 vac and only makes a connection for the rest of the unit. It also does not matter which wire you hook to which terminal. Let me know if you need more help.

    hardrocko

    Thanks for using FixYa

    Feb 13, 2010 | Bryant Heating & Cooling

    1 Answer

    My 4yr old Amana heat pump quit working - the thermostat display was blank. I replaced the thermostat but still no luck after confirming it was installed correctly. My S/N is 0407477962, Model VNC60C2A,...


    Your thermostat can get power from either of two power souces. Primary power would be 24 VAC from a transformer mounted inside your air handler. Second (optional) power may be provided from battery backup, with the batteries mounted inside the thermostat itself.

    Since your display went completely blank, then I would venture to guess that it is related to the 24 VAC circuit, sourced from the air handler. You probably do not have battery back up. Use a DVOM (Digital Volt Ohm Meter) to measure the RED wire connected to your thermostat. Make sure to use the VAC setting on the DVOM.

    The "hot" side is the red wire, and will be connected to the "R" terminal in your thermostat. The Common side will be connected to most likely a blue, a black, or a brown wire. The Common terminal will be labeled "C" (but perhaps B) on your thermostat.

    Since the thermostat is just plain dead you should next locate and check the fuse or breaker for the air handler control circuitry. There may be multiple different breakers/fuses for your heat pump's outdoor circuitry, its indoor controls, and its indoor resistive heat strips. Also, the circuit could be either 120 VAC or 240 VAC. Has one of them tripped or blown a fuse?

    If you have breakers, then flip all of your breakers off and then back on. Stay near the breaker box and wait for a minute, listening/looking to see if any breaker has tripped or if a fuse has blown. Otherwise, if the circuit is fused, then examine or test the fuse. Again, use your DVOM, this time in the Ohms setting. Zero Ohms indicate the fuse is good. A very high Ohms reading is a blown fuse (infinite resistance) In this case, verify that the blown fuse is the CORRECT value. Maybe it isn't. Replace it with the correct amperage fuse. Again, wait a few moments and see if it the new fuse blows.

    If either the new fuse immediately blows, or if the flipped breaker immediately trips, then STOP and call a professional. You have a high-power wiring problem. Call around, and find an expert. It could be that a mouse chewed thru some insullation. You don't know, but don't be sold on replacing an expensive component without verifiable proof of the source of the problem.

    Otherwise, go back and check your 24 VAC "R" Red terminal at the thermostat. If it reads 24VAC hot now, then you have solved the problem, at least temporarily. You now need to know why the breaker tripped or the fuse blew.

    If the circuit is on a breaker, then just replace it. They really do go bad after a while. Pop the old breaker out and bring it with you to the hardware store. Replace it with the correct brand, amperage, and configuration.

    If the circuit was on a fuse, then (a) was it really the correct amperage rating? or (b) is there a chance that you had a hit from the power company or a nearby lightening strike? (probably not, or some of your computer/stereo/other stuff would have been knocked out too.)

    Otherwise, you know the source circuits are good, and you know you don't have 24VAC at the "R" terminal of your thermostat. There are now more possibile causes.... to be continued. Marty

    Dec 09, 2009 | Amana PTH123B25AJ Heat Pump Air...

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