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Not focusing or shooting on anything after 5 feet

I can take photos of the floor and close furnatur or people. As soon as I try to shoot a photo acrross room, It dosn;t work. This is while in Autofocus / Auto Exposure

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Re: Not focusing or shooting on anything after 5 feet

Clean the contacts between camera body and lens, if it worked before. If it has never worked, then try a different lens, to determine if lens or camera.

Posted on Jan 16, 2008

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I have a rebel xt 350D , using 75-300mm 5.6f lens to do some girls basketball photography inside a gym. Had camera set on: ISO 1600, M mode, 5.6f, 200 shutter speed (that seem to set automatically), used...

Unless you were up close and personal, the built-in flash was your problem. Anything past about 15 feet and your picture will be dark. You would have been better off turning the flash off and using available light. Once the flash is off, you can set both aperture and shutter speed in M mode. Another choice would be to lay out some extra bucks and get a separate flash unit. They're much more powerful than the built-in flash.

Jan 19, 2011 | Digital Cameras

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I make photos of my oil paintings - placing the painting on the floor and shooting down. The "auto focus" will not focus on some paintings and the photos are blurry. I have tried all settings tn...

I don't know how close you need to be to the paintings, but if it's close enough to need the "macro"setting, then you need to activate it for close focussing.

Nov 08, 2010 | Fuji FinePix J10 Digital Camera

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Camera will not focus correctly. when shutter button is pushed half way down the picture goes blurry, and if you take the photo it actually turns out blurry.

If you are taking close up photos, you might have to use the "macro" setting. The auto focus only works down to around 5 or 6 feet I think. I have an earlier model of that camera. I use mine for normal use and also close up for work related photos.

Nov 30, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S5500 Digital Camera

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Focus problems with Nikon D700

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Jun 17, 2009 | Nikon D700 Digital Camera

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Images aren't very sharp

that is a good lense if its the one for the camera heres the thing clarity in a picture come from the exposure , the time the light is hitting the film or in digital the sensor . try cutting down the time speed up the exposure or change the f stop.
if it happens in all the modes it is a focus problem try shooting some test shots in controled light say 5 feet from a person inside and outside and see what happenes and consult the lab tech they can usualy show you on your camera how to set it up..
good luck

May 27, 2009 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

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EOS 30D is slow to fire.

Are you sure you aren't in the delay setting in drive mode? This camera has 2 delay settings, one for 2 seconds between when you press the shutter and when it takes the photo, and one with 10 seconds delay - often used when you want to be in the photo (e.g. self-portrait or group photo).

If you aren't in the delay mode, then I need to know more about your settings. What shooting mode are you using? What type of photo are you trying to take (portrait, landscape, sports)? Are you shooting indoors, outdoors, bright sunlight, overcast, etc.?

Dec 30, 2008 | Canon EOS 30D Digital Camera with 18-55mm...

1 Answer

I was somehow roped into shooting a friend's night wedding this weekend, even though my photography "expertise" is entirely limited to shooting in natural light. I am a total amateur (and my friend knows...

First, you MUST practice with the flash before you shoot the wedding. If at all possible arrive 2-3 hours before the ceremony with a friend/model to pose for you so you can practice with the settings until you understand what will and will not work.

Use manual exposure settings (e.g. 1/60th at f5.6) on the camera, and let the flash work in automatic mode to provide the light needed to shoot with the manual settings. Don't try to use flash on subjects further than about 10-15 feet as it won't provide enough light to go that distance - light falls off according to the "square of the distance", so the amount of light you have at 10 feet is 1/4th the light you have at 5 feet (rather than 1/2 the light like you might think). Practice with your model to learn how far your model can be before the flash falls off too much. To shoot at the greatest distance, open the aperture (e.g. f2.8). You can use a smaller aperture only when your subjects are fairly close.

I can't give you exact settings for your flash on a Nikon as I'm a Canon shooter. Look in your camera manual and the flash manual for iTTL.

Do NOT try to shoot in aperture priority. The camera will use a very slow shutter (appropriate for that aperture) to gather the background light, and the flash will provide "flash fill" and you will get motion blur from your hand-holding the camera and from the subjects moving during the long exposure.

Most ministers don't allow flash photography during the actual ceremony, so you need to shoot in available light during the ceremony. Normally you can use flash during the procession to/from the altar, but once the bride reaches the altar you need to stop using flash. If the ceremony is in a dark location (dark church) this can be very VERY difficult. You need fast glass, an f2.8 (or faster) lens for this and will need to shoot at the highest ISO your camera offers. You may want to return to the rental place to rent a fast lens if you don't have one already.

Obviously you need to stay ahead of the action. This means you need to get into the aisle near the end of the service and shoot the kiss from that location, and then shoot the couple as they proceed down the aisle after the ceremony.

If at all possible, take posed photos BEFORE the ceremony. Try to have a 1-hour window to take these photos that ends 1-hour before the ceremony starts. If you can't take the posed photos before the ceremony, try to limit the after-ceremony photos to just a few groups - some photos of bride and groom, with the whole wedding party, with the bride's family, the groom's family, and everyone (all family members and wedding party). Take 3 or more shots of each group so you can swap in eyes or faces if someone looks great in one shot and someone else looks great in a different shot.

Good luck!

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I have trouble in understanding the manual on picture taking. I want to take various pictures for ebay. I will be taking some pictures close-up and others 3-5 feet away. Is there a simple way that everything on one setting. Thanks. Precious78

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