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Fujifil Z10fd and Linux

I have a linux computer too, and when i connect my camera into the usb slot, it cannot recognise my camera. and i also cannot find any software on the internet to download for it. :(

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Who knows why Google does not search Sourceforge for the appropriate software; Fedora 10 seems to have come with F-Spot installed, and as such when I connect the camera and turn it on, images flow!  However, they don't flow perfectly; there are movies and voice annotations to transfer, and they seem not to have transferred.  To solve that I'm going to just copy the directory of the SD card over and thus make sure I have the whole captured content.

So; it's a solved problem, just turn the camera on so it can get recognized in a kernel current enough and ready to listen (SuSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, whatever.)  If your choices at hand seem thin, then check out the selection using yum and/or a browser pointed at Sourceforge.net  (or keep reading Slashdot!)

Posted on Nov 14, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

Can I override the bios at startup so that it will recognize a new hard drive - for linux?


There should be no need to play around with your bios settings. Linux will install on a brand new hard drive as the sole operating system, or on an existing hard drive alongside Windows without any problem.

If you haven't already got a Linux distro, have a look at
http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

Download whichever version of Ubuntu you prefer (LTS- the long term support version is recommended).

When the .iso file containing the operating system had downloaded, burn it onto a dvd, or install it on a usb drive.

Insert the dvd into the drive and restart or switch off/switch on the computer. The dvd will then kick in and offer you the choice of trying Ubuntu without installing, or a full install.

If you're using a new, empty hard drive just follow the on screen instructions and Ubuntu will install as the sole operating system.

If you already have Windows on your hard drive Ubuntu will give you the choice of either erasing Windows or installing Ubuntu alongside Windows. It's your choice.

Installing Ubuntu alongside Windows creates a dual boot hard drive. At start up you just choose which OS to use - Windows or Ubuntu. If creating this dual-boot system Ubuntu puts a (Linux) boot loader into the Windows OS so that Linux is recognised.

If you save the Ubuntu file to a usb drive you then have to change the bios settings so that your computer uses USB as the first boot device. Then restart your computer so that it boots in from your usb .. and Ubuntu will begin installing.

Whichever you use - dvd or usb - during the installation process Ubuntu will ask you how many GB of hard drive space it should use? You do not need to physically partition the hard drive. Linux will do it for you.

If it's a desktop PC you are using with Windows on the first hard drive and are fitting a second hard drive to install Linux on, or have installed Linux on the second hard drive .. and find that Linux doesn't appear at start up, it's because there's no Linux boot loader in Windows.

I quit using Windows many years ago.

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Nov 01, 2015 | Everex IMPACT GC2500 PC Desktop

Tip

Damn Small Linux Guide for survival (Live Linux) CD USB flash


Damn Small Linux is a live linux distribution,
less than 50MB runs completely in memory
and can be booted from a CD-ROM or a USB flash drive.
(Because all the applications are small and light
it makes a very good choice for older hardware.)

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1) How to put Damn Small Linux on the CD

1.a) Download Damn Small Linux
ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/distributions/damnsmall/current/dsl-4.4.10.iso

1.b) Damn Small Linux is distributed as an ISO image.
It is necessary to burn it to CD
using the option of your program to burn CDs
Burn CD ISO image (Windows - Nero / Burn Image to Disc, for example)


1.c) Then you need to restart your computer.

1.d) Depending on the options your motherboard,
it is necessary when starting
your computer keyboard press:
F8 or F12 or Esc, etc..
Thus you will appear a menu where you choose your CD drive.
After
Damn Small Linux menu comes before you.

2) How to put Damn Small Linux on a USB flash drive

2.a) Download Damn Small Linux
ftp://ibiblio.org/pub/Linux/distributions/damnsmall/current/dsl-4.4.10-embedded.zip

2.b) Format the USB flash drive in the FAT32 filesystem. (Windows)
(MyComputer, right click on your USB flash drive, Format, File System = FAT32, start)

2.c)Download and run USB Installer for DSL
to create a bootable Damn Small Linux USB Flash Drive
http://www.pendrivelinux.com/downloads/DSL/USB-Installer-For-DSL-v0.2.exe

2.d) Then you need to restart your computer

Depending on the options your motherboard, it is necessary when starting
your computer keyboard press: F8 or F12 or Esc, etc..
Thus you will appear a menu where you choose your USB flash drive.
After
SliTaz menu comes before you.

3.) You can start using your Damn Small Linux easily



on Jan 23, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Wont boot up


I'm not familiar with a netbook with Android, although I've installed Android a couple of times on my Acer 721 11.6" netbook.

I would recommend abandoning Android and installing Linux Mint LXDE, which is a free OS available for free download from linuxmint.com

Linux comes with almost everything necessary to begin using the computer immediately after installing the OS.

To install it on a netbook, I'm assuming you don't have a DVD optical drive so you have to install it from a USB thumb drive.

First download the .iso file on another computer. Use a free program to create a bootable USB using the .iso file. (You can't just copy the file to the USB drive) ... I'd recommend using Active ISO Burner from NTFS.com ... here's the download link ... http://www.ntfs.com/iso-burning.htm

Once you've created the boobable USB drive from the .iso file, you shoud be able to insert it and start the computer and sse the Linux Mint startup screen. It will come up in LIVE mode, without installing itself, so you can try it out.

If you want to install it, make sure you are connected to the Internet and have your AC power adapter plugged in.

If the computer doesn't come up with the Linux screen, you probably just need to reset your Bios boot order so it boots from the USB driver first. Plug in the USB drive and start the computer. Look of instructions for set up or boot order, usually pressing F2 while the computer is starting. Follow the directions to move the USB to the top of the boot devices, i.e. about the hard drive. Save changes and restart the computer. It should now bood from the USB.

When the LIVE mode comes up, it displays the LInux desktop with an Install icon. If you double click the Install Icon you will begin the installation process and just follow the simple prompts and create a password when prompted.

Linux never requires anti-virus and does not become infected. You can visit the main linuxmint.com website and download the .PDF manual if you are interested.

Your computer is probably 64-bit, but if not, there is also a 32-bit version available for download.

The image shown below is from my Acer and is Linux Mint KDE, which is also available from the same website and similar to LXDE, but more full-featured. All Google programs I know of are available for Linux, since Google usese 100% Linux. Android is Linux also.












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Jul 29, 2014 | Wolvol Mini NOTEBOOK COMPUTER Laptop...

1 Answer

Linux dynex webcam install


Linux is an open-source operating system built on the Unix system that was introduced in the 1990s. It's gradually become widely accepted as an alternative to both Windows and Macintosh because of its reliability and the open-source ethos that provides the software for free. Because the Linux operating system is constantly changing, it can quickly adapt to handle new technology, such as installing a USB webcam.

Plug in your USB webcam. Boot up your Linux system and log in. Fire up a program that uses the camera, such as Skype. If the webcam is fairly recent, there is a good chance that it will work with your Linux distribution. If not, keep reading. Open a terminal window and type the command "dmesg ' more" (without the quotes). This command allows you to thumb through your boot-up messages. Check for any messages that relate to the camera. If you do see a reference, go to your "/lib/modules/usb" subfolder to see if there is a module there that exists for it. Depending on your Linux distribution, your "/usb" subfolder may be in a different location beneath "/lib/modules." You will have to recompile your kernel with support for the module, install the new kernel and then reboot the system to try to connect to the USB camera. Open a terminal window and fire up the "lusb" program. If you are running a graphical environment like Gnome or KDE, you can use the v412-tool to check for a list of USB devices attached to your system. Determine which USB device listed is your camera; there are no hard and fast rules, so guesswork prevails. In the listing for your camera is an eight-digit number with a colon in the middle. This number is the manufacturer's product ID, which you can then use to scour the Internet for a Linux driver. Hope this helps. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Webcam

Jan 27, 2013 | Dynex Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How do i hook up to linux


Linux is an open-source operating system built on the Unix system that was introduced in the 1990s. It's gradually become widely accepted as an alternative to both Windows and Macintosh because of its reliability and the open-source ethos that provides the software for free. Because the Linux operating system is constantly changing, it can quickly adapt to handle new technology, such as installing a USB webcam.

Plug in your USB webcam. Boot up your Linux system and log in. Fire up a program that uses the camera, such as Skype. If the webcam is fairly recent, there is a good chance that it will work with your Linux distribution. If not, keep reading. Open a terminal window and type the command "dmesg ' more" (without the quotes). This command allows you to thumb through your boot-up messages. Check for any messages that relate to the camera. If you do see a reference, go to your "/lib/modules/usb" subfolder to see if there is a module there that exists for it. Depending on your Linux distribution, your "/usb" subfolder may be in a different location beneath "/lib/modules." You will have to recompile your kernel with support for the module, install the new kernel and then reboot the system to try to connect to the USB camera. Open a terminal window and fire up the "lusb" program. If you are running a graphical environment like Gnome or KDE, you can use the v412-tool to check for a list of USB devices attached to your system. Determine which USB device listed is your camera; there are no hard and fast rules, so guesswork prevails. In the listing for your camera is an eight-digit number with a colon in the middle. This number is the manufacturer's product ID, which you can then use to scour the Internet for a Linux driver. Hope this helps. https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Webcam

Jan 19, 2013 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Well i have linux on my computer and my logitech camera wont work on skype or anything nothing will pop up to show me what to do when i plug in the cord to my computer is there any solution??????????????


Hello dear Linux user:

Unlike Windows, Linux will not pop a window notifying about a new USB device, unless it's some kind of file storage.
You could check whether or not you USB WEB camera was recognized by your system by opening a terminal window and type: lsusb and press enter. If you device is listed, it's a good sign.
The next step is to configuring your Skype Client. While logged in Skype, open Audio Options Settings and select pulseaudio for incoming and outgoing. After saving your options, open Video Options and select your USB Camera as your video device from the scroll down menu.
I am not sure what Linux Distribution you have. However, Logitech Cameras are usialy working without any problems on Ubuntu 10 or higher.
Hope this helps

Feb 21, 2011 | Logitech QuickCam Connect Webcam

1 Answer

My computer (ubuntu Linux) doesn`t recognise the A430; It is not possible to import images.What needs to be done?


if you do not find a driver for Linux...try a card reader ..this will be seen auto ..and you will be able to manage the files from the card directly .....just like from a memory stick...or any other removable device ...

Jan 14, 2010 | Canon PowerShot A430 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Pictures won't upload to my computer from Fuji Z10fd


Try NOT connecting your camera to your computer.


The best way to download pictures from your camera to your computer involves removing the memory card from the camera and plugging it into a card reader (either built-in to the computer or connected via USB or FireWire). This is likely to be faster than connecting the camera to the computer, and won't run down your camera's batteries.


Once the card is plugged in, it will appear to your computer as a removable drive. You can use the operating system's drag&drop facility to copy pictures from the card to the computer's hard drive, the same way you copy any other files. Or you can use any photo cataloging program such as Picasa.

Oct 26, 2009 | Fuji FinePix Z10fd Digital Camera

2 Answers

Hi there , My Acer Veriton has no sound card and no facility for one as far as I can see. Is it possible to use a USB external type. And if so how would that work? Rudy, from Australia


USB sound cards work quite well, will your PC support USB2? I have never seen a pc without a sound card? No PCI slots?

USB sound cards have their own internal workings not needed by the PC so it should work just fine. Now if they could just make a USB video driver card :)

Joe

May 19, 2009 | Acer Veriton 5500 PC Desktop

4 Answers

My canon S5 IS is not recongnized by Windows XP in my PC


i am afraid this is a microsoft O/S issue. It will not allow 2 imaging devices with twain drivesrs to be recognised at the same time. You have to disconnect one at the usb plug before the O/S can see the other one.

I have a scanner with twain drivers and XP will not recognise my S5 IS until i unplug the scanner. The O/S is recognising the camera as an imaging device rather than a usb mass storage device like for my other cameras.

Either MS need to fix this conflict issue or Canon need to reconfigure their drivers.

Jan 11, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S5 IS Digital Camera

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