Question about Digital Audio DAS692 6"x9" Full-Range Speakers Car Speaker

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What is the rms and peak power of of these speakers?

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Hello jabster628,

They claim 200 watts RMS. Many inexpensive "no-name-brand" speakers are overrated so I'd recommend powering them with no more than about half that

I could not find a peak power rating, but such a figure is useless anyway, since it's whatever the manufacturer wants it to be.

Hope this helps.

Posted on Oct 06, 2009

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Hi,I have two 250w speakers at 8ohms ,could someone tell me if I need to get a amp with higher watts than the speakers?k


Speakers are rated either at RMS (root mean square) average power or Peak Power. An RMS of about 125 watt is equivalent to 250 watt peak. To match the radio and speakers they both need to be consistent. Also do not be confused with total radio power out vs per channel.

So if the speakers are 250 watt peak power then a radio with 125 watt per channel or 250 watt peak per channel would be a good match.
If the speakers are RMS 250 watt then the radio would be 250 RMS/channel and usually with a four channel radio a total of 1000W RMS
With that much power the neighbors should hear you coming!

Dec 02, 2015 | Car Audio & Video

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Watts rms?


It is the root mean square (abbreviated RMS or rms), roughly 0.707 of the peak wattage of an AC source. Crutchfield lists it at >power range: 2-110 watts RMS (450 watts peak power)

Sep 16, 2013 | Kenwood KFC-6986 Coaxial Car Speaker

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Want to run 2 subs of 1 amp ep 4,000 in bridge mode.


You can do that but your subs will have to be monsters or you will blow them out as bridged mode will drive 2400 watts RMS into 4 ohms. Many speakers are rated in peak or program power... these are FAKE specifications. with this amp in bridged mode each of two identical speakers would have to be rated at 2400 watts program or about 3600 watts peak each to survive... When rating speakers and amps ALWAYS compare RMS values... and for safety use an amp of 80% of the RMS rating of the connected speaker or speaker system.

Aug 28, 2011 | Behringer EUROPOWER EP4000 4,000-Watt...

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I have a Sony CDX-M30 Marine Stereo that when the volume is turned up over 20, it cuts off, then comes back on and if you don't turn it down, it cuts off again. Recently, it only has to be around...


One possible cause is a mismatched speaker system. Most stereo equipment specifies 8 ohm speakers to match the 8 ohm amplifier output resistance. A well known electronic formula states maximum power transfer occurs when the resistance in and the resistance out are equal. When there is a mismatch, more power is required to obtain the same sound pressure levels. By turning the volume up higher to do this, the electrical requirements to drive the speakers at that level may be exceeding that which the amp can provide. When this happens, the amp shuts down due to overload. Continued operation in this condition can cause permanent failure.

Another possible cause is the power requirements of the speakers to be driven properly. Larger speakers require more power to move the speaker coil and and cone. Connecting a speaker that requires 10 watts to be driven to an amplifier that provides up to 8 or even 10 watts will require that the amp be operating at 100% of capacity. An amplifier run like this will have a short life.

Connect speakers that match the amplifier's impedance requirements (8 ohm types are pretty standard / common) and will operate with the amount of power (in watts) that the amp can supply. Make sure you're comparing watt ratings in similar units. "P-P" (Peak to Peak), "Peak" (or Max") and "RMS" are typical terms. RMS is the is the most common standard used, but as you'll see below, some manufacturers like to use different units to make their products seem to have more power than they actually do. You can convert easily between the terms like this:

200W P-P equals 100W peak, and also equals 71W RMS

"Peak" is 1/2 the value of "Peak to Peak" (P-P) and "RMS" which stands for Root Mean Squared, is 70.7% of Peak. 200W P-P sure sounds like it's more than 70W RMS - doesn't it? It's all pretty simple once you know. Lastly, the fictional unit "Music Power" can be anything really, but is often either Peak or P-P values. It's just more smoke and mirrors by some manufacturers.

I hope this helps and good luck. Please rate my reply. Thanks!

May 12, 2011 | Sony CDX-C5005 CD Player

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How can i get more power through 8 ohm speakers?


In addition to the impedance rating of a speaker, there is also a wattage rating. Ideally, power output of the amplifier should not exceed the power handling rating of the speakers. The input impedance of the speakers should match the amplifier output impedance for maximum power transfer (Rin = Rout where R is resistance in Ohms). Supplying more power or wattage to the speaker than it can handle will result in distortion, and if the output of the amp is high enough and present long enough, it will damage the voice coil of the speaker. Make sure that when comparing wattage ratings, you are comparing the same rating between amps & speakers. Watts can be expressed three different ways: "Peak", "Peak to Peak" and the industry standard "RMS". The relationship is such: an industry standard value of "70 Watts RMS" (70W RMS) equals "100 Watts Peak" (100W P) *and* also is the same as "200 Watts Peak to Peak" (200W P-P). Furthermore, there is no such thing as 200W "Music Power" (but is often expressed this way to inflate the RMS wattage rating (and usually is close to the P-P rating). A speaker is an electrical device, so most the things that happen to electrical devices when over powered can happen to speakers and amplifiers, too.

Increasing the signal source level (input signal to the amp via volume control) in an attempt to get more audio power to the speaker can overdrive the amplifier - resulting in "clipping". This is plainly heard as "muddied" sound. The otherwise loud, crisp, clean passages in music end up sounding garbled and unpleasant when an amplifier is over driven in this way. This can damage both the amp and the speaker.

Cheap amps with higher THD (total harmonic distortion) ratings sound worse than their counterparts with a lower THD rating - when all other variables are the same. You'll pay extra for lower THD values.

You might be able to make a speaker seem louder by positioning the speakers against a wall, on the floor, etc. Experiment; as it can make a significant difference in sound levels and low frequency bass sounds.

I hope this was helpful!

Jun 11, 2010 | Yamaha Emx62m Powered PA Mixer System

1 Answer

Subwoofer and amplifier wattage problem


No it will sound good if you can put an amplifier with 500 watts rms it will sound better

Jan 27, 2010 | Sony Xplod 1100 Watt Max 10" Subwoofer,...

2 Answers

I installed a sony 600watt amp and it works but old rockford fosgate 200 hit harder how do i make my amp louder and evenly spread throughout my car


Hello jmanbutt99,

The old Rockford-Fosgate was probably producing the rated power. The Sony is most likely overrated. But, it's supposed to be stable on each individual channel down to 2 ohms and will deliver 65 watts RMS into that load. So to get the most from it, your best bet would be a pair of 4 ohm speakers paralleled to each channel. A relatively efficient speaker like the Kicker 07DS600's shown here should provide pretty good sound.

http://www.crutchfield.com/p_20607DS60/Kicker-07DS600.html?tp=105

These will work with as little as 6 watts RMS and can handle up to 50 watts RMS so the Sony should power them really well. They're 4 ohm so a pair in parallel will present a 2 ohm load.

Hope this helps

Oct 30, 2009 | Sony Xplod XM-554ZR Car Audio Amplifier

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Ok...im getting a speaker that has an 8 nominal load and 600W peak 400Wprogram and 200W RMS...two...what is RMS and what kind of amp do i need so that i dont get screwd over. thank you bunchesand also i...


RMs is the average power (really basically) > You need to get an amp that is around 150W - 180 WRMS. You need to be really specific about the rms. Dont let guys tell you 1000 W peak etc. Peak is term that can often have several meanings, but true RMS is the norm standard for assesing proper power in pro gear. Whatever you find check out the specs for yourself in writing!!!
Hope it helps

Jul 26, 2009 | Audio Players & Recorders

1 Answer

Is amp big enough for speakers


Hello,

To run 2 subs, the amp would be a little small. The subs will run OK, they just won't be very loud.

It's usually better to compare and match up the RMS power rather than the peak power. The Sony XS-L10P5B sub has a peak power handling figure of 1200 watts, but the RMS is 300 watts. The Sony XM-ZZR3301 monoblock amp puts out 1100 watts peak, but only 330 watts RMS. They would work great together, 1 sub, 1 amp. But if you add another sub, each one would only be getting about 165 watts. They'd work OK, just not as loud as they could be.

Hope this helps!

Mar 28, 2009 | Sony Xplod 1100 Watt Max 10" Subwoofer,...

1 Answer

Auto decks and speakers


That's a 200W total output, which in a four-speaker system means 50W to each speaker. Keep in mind that this is a peak output, not a continuous power output. When you shop for amps or head units, pay more attention to the RMS rating (most of the better brands will give you both). This is the amount of power the unit puts out continuously. The peak power rating is how much it can put out in a burst. Similarly for speakers, buy based on the RMS rating more than the peak rating - you want to know how much power you can safely pump into the speakers continuously - the RMS rating will give that to you.

By definition, RMS value would be (peak rating) x(.707) but for ease of use, look at a peak value and figure on an RMS (continuous) rating of about half that - it allows you to err on the side of caution.

For what it's worth, 25W continuous to each speaker may not seem like much, but a lot of factory stereo systems put 15W or less to each speaker. 25W by comparison is a significant step up.

Jul 09, 2008 | Car Audio & Video

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