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How do you focus in macro - Cameras

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  • Obertelli
    Obertelli May 11, 2010

    That all depends upon what you're using. Please state the make and model of camera (and lens if it's an SLR) which you want to take close-up photos with.

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  • Cameras Master
  • 1,099 Answers

The zoom in full is speacified in the max. lens extention/zoom.
In order to give you a more accurate number. You will have to specify your brand and model of your product.

Posted on Oct 19, 2009

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1 Answer

Macro focus


That is correct. None of Nikon's 70-300mm lenses are designed as macro lenses. They won't focus closer than about 1.5 meters or 5 feet.

May 20, 2012 | Nikon D7000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

The distance focus ring, is it supposed to turn all the way to the macro symbol when you are focusing on a subject that is very close?


If you're right "on top" of the subject - then, yes - it should indicate "macro". Macro focusing is for "very up close" photography and is exactly as you describe. You simply physically move the camera a little closer to or further from the subject to focus.

Not all lenses are capable of macro focusing. The vast majority of these non-macro lenses are required to be at least a couple (or more) feet away to focus. Macro lenses on the other hand can usually get just inches away - which is a great capability.

Enjoy your macro lens!

Oct 12, 2010 | Canon EF 28-80mm f/3.5 -5.6 USM Lens

1 Answer

Canon SX200 IS macro focus problem


I have the exact same problem, with macro, super macro, or manual focus. Sometimes the macro focus works so well that I can actually capture finger prints on a subject. Other times (most of the time) the focus in macro mode just does not work.

I have read in some forums that it may be related to the amount of light being used when in macro mode; although that doesn't seem to fix the problem for me, maybe that will help your solution. Could you try it out, ie. try macro mode with a brighter light source?

Jan 26, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SX 200 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

I can't get the macro adapter to work ?


Put the macro adapter on the camera and move the camera in and out from an object to try to focus the object in the display. Remember, macro is very small, very close and very small field-of-focus. I hope this helps.

May 28, 2009 | Vivitar Telephoto 100mm f/3.5 Macro Manual...

1 Answer

Lens for Nikon D60


I will try to help you, but please understand that my experience is with Nikon film cameras. Assuming that the D60 works in a manner similar to a Nikon 35 mm body and that Sigma macro lens work like Nikon macro lens, you should be able to determine the usable subject to lens distance by experimentation. First, make sure the lens is in the macro mode. To do this you must set the auto-focus mode control to the manual focus mode (see your manual). On Nikon lenses, you must first set the focus ring to infinity, then move slider switch, which has two positions marked; "normal" and "macro., to the macro position. You should now be able to rotate the focus ring to the macro range. Use the zoom ring to zoom in and out and focus with the focus ring. The the range over which the lens to subject to lens distance will yield an in focus image will be rather limited and in the range of an inch or so to 6 or 8 inches.

Dec 09, 2008 | Cameras

1 Answer

Super macro


Press the macro button once to get it to display the Macro Mode sign. Press and hold it after that to get it into Super Macro

Once you are in Super Macro, you can't move the lens so you MUST use the Manual Focus (MF) button that is located right above the Macro toggle button. While holding the MF button, use the 4 way directional pad to focus in and out. Press the Up and Down to focus.
You have to be REALLY close for Super mode.. less than about 6 inches

Aug 16, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S5 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Canon S5 IS. I am having problems with Macro shooting. As I look through view finder, object seems in focus, but when I press focus lock button (halfway) the image jumps out of focus.


Dear Stefan:

Barring a malfunction with your len's autofocusing mechanism, the problem that you're experiencing is likely due to the limitations of the camera's focusing / zoom range in Macro mode.

You didn't say what ranges you were shooting from but basically, in order to get proper focus, you must first make sure you're within the proper lens to subject distance for the macro mode that you've chosen.

There are two macro modeson the S5, Macro and Super Macro. Macro shooting is done only within the ranges of 3.9 inches to 1.6 feet from your subject. SuperMacro mode (which is entered into by simply pressing the Macro button for one second) will only focus within the ranges of 0 inches to 3.9 inches. So if you are in either of these modes and stray from their focusing ranges, your camera won't focus properly.

Another issue that you may be dealing with is the very limited zoom range in Macro/Super Macro Modes. The zoom is basically meant to be set toward the maximum wide angle end of the zoom range. There is a yellow indicator bar below the Zoom Bar in the viewfinder that indicates the Out-Of-Zoom range in which the zoom basically can't be used. As you may see, only the first 10% or so of the zoom range is useable.

It might be that you could possibly be wavering in and out of the two macro mode focusing ranges and/or zooming into the Out-Of-Range zone during your session. Either can cause a similar effect such as you are describing. It's hard to say without actually being there.

To test this out I would simply set my camera on a tripod or other stand at a known fixed distance from the subject, set the camera to the macro mode indicated by that distance (either MACRO or SUPERMACRO), zoom out to the widest focal length and take the shot to see if it is clear or not.

If so, your camera probably has no problem. If it is still not focusing properly you might want to send it into the service center for a diagnostic. There is no charge to diagnose a problem with your camera and if nothing is found to be wrong you will only be out of the shipping charges spent to send the camera in to the service center. If a repair is needed, it can be done at that time.

Hope this helps you.

Sincerely,
HeavyDLB

Jun 01, 2008 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

Focusing problems


You may be beyond (up to close) the focal capability of the lens. Even though there is a macro setting, the lens may not have the capability to focus on an object that close (without adding an external macro lens). The specification on the minimal distance for focus should be listed in the owner's manual.

Mar 04, 2008 | Olympus SP-350 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Trouble focusing with sigma 70-300 DL macro super lens


It will not focus on anything closer than 5 feet.

(From Sigma lens literature)
Capable of macro photography, this lens has a 1:2 maximum close-up magnification at the 300 mm focal length. It's the ideal high performance lens for portraits, sports photography, nature photography, and other types of photography that frequently use the telephoto range. It also has a switch for changeover to macro photography at focal lengths between 200mm and 300mm with a maximum close-up magnification from 1:2.9 to 1:2. The minimum focusing distance is 1.5m / 59 in. at all zoom settings.

Dec 25, 2007 | Sigma AF 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 DL Macro Super...

1 Answer

Focus in Macro mode


1. Do not use the zoom while using macro. 2. When clicking the Macro button, click it again, only for 2 more seconds at the second click, it goes to 'Super macro' mode for zero distance. This works in the Canon S3 IS, I hope it will help you in the older S2 IS. 3. Use a tripod. 4. Use the timer for no movement when using a tripod. 5. Try using the manual focus, it does the trick when the camera doesn't focus automatically. Good Luck!

Aug 13, 2006 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

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