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Will a compression fitting work on 1/2'' galv. pipe?

I will be doing a little plumbing job that I am worried about. The plumbing was put in aroung 1920 and it is 1/2'' galvanized pipe. Going to try to remove from the end of a line a fitting and connect in with PEX. My fear is when I remove the fitting the threads will peal off and I will have to go to the next joint and have the same thing happen again. If the threads do peal off is there a connection that I can make in the middle of a nipple that does not require the use of threads? I was wondering if a compression fitting will work??

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The best way is to just keep peeling back untill u get a decent joint to goto per, either by using an mip in a fitting or by using an fip on the end of the treaded pipe

Posted on Dec 01, 2012

  • cmartineau
    cmartineau Dec 01, 2012

    *pex not per

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They do make a compression coupling for galvanized pipe, but I don't trust them very much. When you unscrew the joint with a pipe wrench just make sure to back it up with another, so you don't start to unscrew the next joint back.

Posted on Oct 04, 2009

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Sharkbite fittings are not designed for galvanized pipe. They are designed for copper, pex and cpvc gauge pipe. Try to only cut the galvanized pipe with a hacksaw or a pipe cutter ( with wheels). A power tool such as a reciprocating saw will vibrate the rest of the plumbing and cause future leaks. You can go to the next fitting and install a male thread by compression type transition fitting. It is very important to counter hold any galvanized fitting to prevent any movement that may leak.

Posted on Oct 14, 2009

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I'm a big fan of the SharkBite push fittings-- now if you are doing work behind a wall most tradesmen will not recommend using one of these because they have not been tested over extended periods of time-- however from my experience they work great and could not be easier to use!

Here's a site: http://www.pexsupply.com/SharkBite-Fittings-595000

Posted on Oct 09, 2009

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