Question about Hunter Fan Gamo Sport Air Rifle Combo

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How do i set up a lazersight that is mounted on top of a rifle? it would have to be at an angle? how do i make it accurate from any distance?!

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You don't. If you angle the laser, the path of the beam will intersect the path of the projectile fired from the rifle at one point (probably, unless you're shooting at a slightly upward angle and the laser is pointed straight, then the projectile will cross the path of the laser once as it rises, then again as it comes back down.). You've got basically two options. Either you zero the site at a certain distance, say 25 yards. Then you realize that the dot made by the laser is where your projectile is going to hit at 25 yards and the more you change that distance from your target the further off that point of impact will be. The other option is to mount it in such a way as to have the path of the laser beam parallel with the path of the projectile as it exits the barrel. Then just account for the fact the the point of impact will be that distance below the dot. Well, to a point anyway. After a while the bullet will be affected by gravity more and start to drop, but that's probably going to happen around the same time the dot from the laser loses focus.

Posted on Aug 10, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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What does the 15 ys mean?


How to Zero Your Rifle Scope: 15 Steps (with Pictures ...

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wikiHowLearning to properly mount, sight, and adjust a rifle scope will result in accurate shots and saved ... MESSAGES. LOG IN ... Start with a good quality base mount and mounting rings to ensure that your scope will be held sturdy for years to come.

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How does one install this hinge properly?


1. Use somebody, or some clamps to keep the angle set while you mark and install the pieces. The angle is the most crucial feature. The other measurements are secondary to this.
2. Make other measurements from the center of the hinge where it pivots, not the edge of the box. When you use the center technique, you don't need to worry about distance from the back, only distance from the top.
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1 Answer

How to sight in crosman extreme g1 pellet rifle scope


You would sight in an air rifle scope in the same manner as any other standard scope that you might find on a rifle:

You want to secure the rifle as best you can with the sights pointed towards a target, which should be set at the desired distance.

Reduce the error of your sight adjustments either by mounting the rifle in a gun mount or simply resting the stock (not the barrel!) on a solid surface such as a table.

Make sure that the weight of the rifle is carefully supported and the **** is firmly pressed into your shoulder. Looking through the sights, aim at the very center of the target (which for your purposes can be as simple as a piece of paper with a dot drawn in the middle).

Take time to ensure a careful shot, and be sure to avoid any shaking, utilizing the support of the mount/table (try resting the fore-grip of the stock on a roll of paper towels if you're having trouble keeping the rifle steady).

Once you are confident with the placement of the cross-hairs over the center of the target, gently squeeze (don't pull) the trigger.

Determine where the pellet struck the target, and adjust the scope accordingly; while every scope is a little different, the same basic principles for adjustment apply. Unscrew the caps on the top and side of the scope, and carefully read the markings on the adjustment dials.

If the pellet struck low, twist the dial on the top of the scope 'up' (the markings should specify clockwise/counter), and if the pellet struck high, twist in the opposite direction. If the pellet struck to the left or right, follow the same procedure for the dial on the side of the scope.

If the pellet struck low and to the side, make the vertical (up/down) adjustments first, repeat the shot, and only move on to make adjustments left/right once the pellet strikes in vertical alignment with the center of the target.

Take your time, and adjust in increments of only 2-3 clicks to start. Repeat the procedure until the pellets are striking consistently in the center of the target (if you're having a hard time remembering which shot went where, replace the target and continue.

Once you are satisfied with placement of your shot groupings on the targets, replace the dial covers on the scope.

Tips and Notes:
- In order to maintain the accuracy of your rifle, try to avoid resting the rifle on its scope and try to prevent the barrel from contact.

- Take note of your rifle's range, and be aware that the further away you place the target, the less consistent your results will be.

- Be realistic; don't attempt to sight in an air rifle at 50 yards. Remember that even with a rifle that has been professionally sighted, good results still come down to the accuracy of the shooter.

-Sight in your rifle at a range where you are confident in your own abilities; start with a closer target and only move back (i.e. sight in at a greater distance) if necessary.

Further Instruction:
http://www.chuckhawks.com/sight-in_rifle.htm
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLirsAFpsfE

May 05, 2011 | Sport & Outdoor - Others

2 Answers

Can you explain to me about moas? i got this new p4 and im trying to learn how to use it can you tell me? and do i have to site it in at 100 yards first?


If you are going to attempt to sight in your rifle scope for hunting or just shooting, you will need a basic understanding of what a Minute of Angle is.

Think of a circle as it is divided into 360 degrees.

Each degree is divided into 60 minutes.

Each minute is divided into 60 seconds, but we don't use that for ballistics, seconds of angle are just used in machine shops and in rocket science.

Minute of Angle

1 MOA = 1/60th of a degree

1 MOA = 1.047 inches at 100 yards
Most accurate long range scopes are set in quarter clicks (4 clicks = 1 MOA) or eighth clicks (8 clicks = 1 MOA) but less accurate short range scopes are sometimes set in half MOA clicks (2 clicks = 1 MOA)? which to me is the opposite as it should be.


For a .308 the difference between shooting at 100 yards and at 500 yards is about 11 MOA. That adjustment with a scope using eighth clicks is 88 clicks.


Most accuracy testing is done at 100 yards, because it makes the math easier, and it is close enough to see the bullet holes through a spotting scope.

Folks usually say that 1 MOA is equal to 1 inch at 100 yards, which is almost exactly correct, as 1 MOA is only slightly more than 1 inch at 100 yards. But for what we are doing it is close enough. Now think it on out to 300 yards, 1 MOA is then equal to 3 inches. So if your shots are 1 inch off to the left at 100 yards; out at 300 yards, you will be off to the left 4 inches. Clear as mud? Hope this helps.

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2 Answers

1. HOW TO READ SCALING OF SCOPE.? 2. What is


You have not provided enough information for us to help you. What type of rifle? What do you mean by scaling?

With the scope on 3 power you should be able to sight it in at 25 meters. Going to a higher magnification may cause blurring at that distance.

You also may have mounting problems that are causing the scope to move around when you shoot. Your rifle may be fine.

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1 Answer

From a point on the ground, a person notices a 110-foot antenna on the top of a hill subtends an angle of 1.5 deg. If the angle of elevation on the bottom of the antenna is 25 deg, find the height of the...


Draw one right-angle triangle:

D
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/'
/ '
/ '
/ '
A===B

A = your location
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C = bottom of the antenna
D = top of the antenna

The A-B distance is constant.
The B-C distance is unknown.
The B-C-D distance is unknown.
The C-D distance is given.
The C-A-B angle is given as 25 degrees.
The D-A-C angle is given as 1.5 degrees.

Use SINE and COSINE functions to determine the B-C distance.

Tell your teacher that you found the answer to your homework on the Internet.

Sep 24, 2010 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

How do I adjust my scope on my Crossman bb/pellet rifle .177


Assuming the scope is ok, and the gun is ok, it must be the shooter, Not you but the stance, holding, bench rest, something is not consistent. If I was you, I would set up a big piece of cardboard at 15 yards, get the rifle on a beanbag or a bench rest, aim at a one inch spot in the center of the cardboard, shoot about 3 times, depending on where the pellet is hitting, move the adj knobs accordingly, do it again, 3 times, adj, as many times as it takes, get it centered, then, shoot it about 3 times at a clean plate, if it hits it's mark 3 times, then you can try it standing, and you should be able to build confidence in it so you know where it shoots, and won't be discouraged. Now if the rifle is bad, or the scope mounts loose, you will fight the thing all day and end up trashing it. I would blame the mounts first, then the scope, then the rust spot in the barrel, rare. If it is a break action rifle, you can set it up in a box with v's cut into it, look through the bore at the target, make sure it doesn't move, the scope should be looking at the same exact thing, if it isn't, something is wrong. You can set it up this way to start, and then fine tune it with pellets. Check it out, hope this helps.

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1 Answer

How to use the BDC on my rifle scope



  1. Step 1 Take a rifle with a properly installed BDC bullet drop compensating reticle to a rifle range. Using ear protection zero the scope reticle so that the point of impact corresponds to the center of the cross hairs at the distance you have selected - typically 100 or 200 yds.
  2. Step 2 Determine the trajectory of the specific cartridge you have selected. There are several ways to do this. Ammo manufacturers publish trajectory and wind drift information. There are web based ballistic calculators like http://www.biggameinfo.com/BalCalc.aspx which will tell you how much your bullet drops at known distances.
  3. Step 3 Scope manufacturers like Leupold can be a valuable source of information about their reticle: "Leupold® Ballistic Aiming System: Boone and Crockett Club® Big Game Reticle aiming system provides a series of additional aiming points to improve your ability to shoot accurately at longer ranges. Nikon2_bing.gif also provides good information suggesting the marks on their reticle be used for zero at 100yds followed by circles below representing 200, 300, 400 and 500 yds if the cartridge travels around 2800 ft per sec. Nikon suggests the center cross hair be zeroed at 200 yds for magnum calibers traveling around 3000 ft per sec. We understant that each variation of different bullet weight and powder charge changes trajectory and a scope manufacturer can not build a different reticle for each different cartridge made so practice on the range to determine how well the marks relate to the actual impact of where your bullet strikes at a know distance is important. The one thing that people using BDC scopes typically have problems with is that a BDC scope has the reticle in the second focal plane of the scope. If the reticle was in the first focal plane of the scope the reticle would look smaller on low powers like 3x and grow proportionately larger as the power increased to say 9x top power. The problem is that while the marks on the BDC reticle correspond accurately to the bullet drop at the know distances 200, 300yds etc. What happens when you lower the power from the scopes maximum power to any other lower power is the reticle stays the same size and the field of view within the scope increases which means that the distance between these marks on the BDC reticle no longer corresponds to the point where the bullet will strike. In short BDC reticles only work at the maximum power of the scope or at a set specific power. At all other powers these BDC reticles do not accurately represent where the bullet will strike.
  4. Step 4 The center X always remains the same. If you zero at 100 yards and you know that your bullet drops 8 inches at 300 yards you could forget about the BDC marks and hold the center X 8 inches high - that works at any power 3x or 9x and should be used at lower powers. If you zero the center crosshair at 100yds and have the BDC scope at the maximum power 9X then the first line or circle below the center X should be the mark you place on the center of the 200 yard target----- the bullet strike should hit the center. If by some chance you put the scope on 3x and placed that first mark below the center cross hair on that 200 yard target you would shoot over the top of the target. This is because as the power of the scope decreases the field of view increases the angle increase and gets wider. You can experiment with known power settings and see at a specific power say 3x what that first circle down corresponds to and make notes because at any set power what the marks correspond to will be repeatable.
I got this from a website, hope it helps.

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1 Answer

3-9x50 BSA Deerhunter Rifle Scope.


What that means is they are not mounted correctly. The scope mounts should be square with your rifle when fitted, when the scope is placed into the mounts, it should be turned to be square with the rifle.

Firstly, make sure you do not "cant" when you shoot. That is hold the rifle at an angle instead of vertical. Once you are sure that is OK, then put it into a vice using blanket or some other soft material to protect the stock. Get the rifle perfectly square using a spirit level. There should be a flat spot on the top of the action that you can use. Once this is achieved, you loosen off the scope mounts and square the scope up to your satisfaction. Once done, tighten the mounts up and then remove from the vice.

Feb 10, 2010 | Optics

1 Answer

Simmons scope that will not stay on target


Mount the rifle with the scope and make a mark on the backstop right where the crosshairs are pointed at

Shoot several times, several shots will surley jolt the scope some.

If the crosshairs have moved much past your mark then this would indicate the scope is the issue.

If the crosshairs are still pretty well centered to the mark, its not the scope.

If at the same time your grouping looks terrible, and your scope still is on the mark, and the gun is WELL mounted, then the issue is with the accuracy of the rifle.
Make sure the rifle is mounted good for this to ba accurate .
Hope this helps

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