Question about Nikon D300 Digital Camera

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I don't know how to set the Nikon D300 for fast picture shooting.

I 'd like to take some photos of my son in his baseball game but I can't seem to set the camera correctly for Multiple Exposure. Can anyone help?

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Setting it to portrait mode should do it. Hold down the shutter button, it should be working. I'm not overly familiar with nikons, but otherwise it'll be in a menu mode if you switch it to a more manual setting. Probably under shooting mode. Set it to continuous shoot

Posted on Oct 02, 2009

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Flash Setting Causes Delay


Without seeing the image, it's difficult to pinpoint the problem. But, going on the description you've described here, my guess would be that your shutter speed is too low to record any movement sharply, or is recording movement you are making while holding the camera. Some things that you may want to review with the camera to ensure that you're shooting the images correctly:

First, if you can look at the image using a photo editing program, see if you can review the EXIF (also called metadata) file and look at the exposure. Generally, anything under 1/30th of a second will show motion blur introduced from hand-holding the camera. If the shutter speed is below this, you should consider using a higher ISO setting or opening the apperture (this equates to a lower "F" number, so "F4" allows in LESS light than "F2.8") to allow more light into the lens. Remember that doubling the ISO will allow you to make an exposure with HALF the light. The down side to this is that higher ISO settings, particularly in Point and Shoot cameras, introduce higher levels of noise.

Ensure that you are no more than 10 feet from your subject. Most on-camera flash units are much less effective beyond this distance.

If you are photographing sports/action, remember that a shutter speed of 1/250th of a second will eliminate most motion blur.

Also remember that most point and shoot digital cameras are "one chip" cameras and often have multiple tasks to perform while making an image (focus, exposure, flash, recording and writing the file are all performed at the same time...), so it's not uncommon to see delays (also called "shutter lag") in point and shoot cameras (DSLR's have multiple chips, and don't have this issue...). One way to resolve this is to depress the shutter release half way. This keeps the chip "hot" and ready to expose. Doing this with a point and shoot camera greatly increases the responsiveness to the shutter release.

Hope this helps and happy shooting!

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Try change the exposure of the camera: start the camera, set the dial to 'I' (automatic iso), then press the 'up' menu near the display until 'exposure' settings appear. move the slider to the left/right, according to your preference.
I reccomend using the automatic iso for taking pictures, it automatically adjust exposure.

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Can not take a picture, setting are not correct


Digital cameras allow you to take pictures at different quality setting. The higher the setting the better the photo quality. Higher settings use more memory then lower settings. If you intend to make prints, always use a medium or high setting. The low setting should only be used when all you want to do is view the pictures on your computer or send them by email or over the Internet.

Recommended camera settings for portraits:
Focal length: 100 mm
Aperture: F2.8 (as large a f/stop as is available for proper exposure)
Exposure / Shooting Mode: Aperture Priority / Portrait
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Recommended camera settings for landscapes:
Focal length: 38 mm
Aperture: F16 (as small a f/stop as is available for proper exposure)
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Tripod: Yes, for long exposures

Digital Camera Tutorial - Better Photo Taking - Taking Digital ...Jus check this site for more details

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Hello there,
If you are correctly metering the exposure of your photos, and you suspect it may be the camera, try resetting the camera to its default settings using the menu. Clearing all the custom functions as well can sometimes help. I have seen some cameras get "stuck" into a weird shooting mode. Also, don't always trust your LCD. It is only there for reference, but is almost never a true representation of what you're going to get. 
Hope this helps!

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camera makers would like to use flash lights as bright as the sun, so the flash is fine. the problem lies in the exposure time. continue trying different exposure settings. most makers provide these as pre-programmed settings while some offer manual fine tuning.

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Not all cameras can do this. The Nikon N8008, for example, allows you to specify the number of exposures for each frame. The N80, on the other hand, doesn't. You have to cancel the Multiple Exposure mode to advance to the next frame, then set M-E again.

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