Question about Office Equipment & Supplies

8 Answers

My Slim Desktop NEC ML250 has blown it's power supply coded 'FSP-250-50LA'. I'm told tha these are end-of-life...so no replacement. Can you repair the PSU's ???

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  • chrisapadget Oct 01, 2009

    Hi there,



    Thanks for your reply,

    I have the following commnts....



    First, I applied for Premium service with you guys, to get exact 'Fix' information, not a general statement.



    Second, there are refurbished units on the market, & I have read an article relating to thousands of PSU's that were marketed i think by FSP, fitted new in both NEC & DELL equipement. ( About 3yrs ago i think).

    The article talks of faulty batch runs of capacitors fitted in the PSU's.



    I paid my premium with you guys to determine exactly what components need to be changed (known issue...plus typically failed parts that will need replacing)



    If you have no ''fix' knowledge on this subject then please refund the charge...i won't be happy with general chit-chat....the power supply units are not resin encapsulated in this instance.



    Please advise...just need to be objective....maybe i've come to the wrong service-provider...let me know please.



    Regards,

    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 01, 2009

    My Slim Desktop NEC ML250 has blown it's power supply coded 'FSP-250-50LA'. I'm told tha these are end-of-life...so no replacement. Can you repair the PSU's ???

    Comments:
    Oct 01, 2009 - Hi there,

    Thanks for your reply,
    I have the following commnts....

    First, I applied for Premium service with you guys, to get exact 'Fix' information, not a general statement.

    Second, there are refurbished units on the market, & I have read an article relating to thousands of PSU's that were marketed i think by FSP, fitted new in both NEC & DELL equipement. ( About 3yrs ago i think).
    The article talks of faulty batch runs of capacitors fitted in the PSU's.

    I paid my premium with you guys to determine exactly what components need to be changed (known issue...plus typically failed parts that will need replacing)

    If you have no ''fix' knowledge on this subject then please refund the charge...i won't be happy with general chit-chat....the power supply units are not resin encapsulated in this instance.

    Please advise...just need to be objective....maybe i've come to the wrong service-provider...let me know please.

    Regards,
    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 01, 2009

    The end-of-life...is a comment relating to the PSU's no longer being manufactured...& they are a special phsical size to suit 'slim NEC Desktop' units.



    I AM technical & do repar LCD TV & Panel units....wha I'm asking you guys is what goes faulty on the 'FSP-250-50LA' Power supply units & what needs changing to fix them........that's the reason i've come to 'FixYa'!



    If you Guys don't have answers then your not helping..& i really need the cost back.

    If you Guys do have the answer to 'Fixing' the 'FSP-250-50LA'....then please advise



    I have over 30 Pc's to repair due to these faulty psu's



    You were recommended by a colleague....but maybe i'm in the wrong place!



    Please advise...



    Regards,

    Chris.

  • chrisapadget Oct 01, 2009

    The end-of-life...is a comment relating to the PSU's no longer being manufactured...& they are a special physical size to suit 'slim NEC Desktop' units.



    I AM technical & do repar LCD TV & Panel units....wha I'm asking you guys is what goes faulty on the 'FSP-250-50LA' Power supply units & what needs changing to fix them........that's the reason i've come to 'FixYa'!



    If you Guys don't have answers then your not helping..& i really need the cost back.

    If you Guys do have the answer to 'Fixing' the 'FSP-250-50LA'....then please advise



    I have over 30 Pc's to repair due to these faulty psu's



    You were recommended by a colleague....but maybe i'm in the wrong place!



    Please advise...



    Regards,

    Chris.

  • chrisapadget Oct 01, 2009

    I knew that BEFORE i talked to you Guys.

    I came to you Guys for the 'Fixit' info...i believe it's a common problem with this unit.



    As i've paid you Guys to advise what's needed FixIt, can you please get the info to me....or tell me that you can't supply the info, in which case please tell me and avise how i get my funds back.



    I have 30+ of these units to repair !!!



    Regards,

    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 01, 2009

    I knew that BEFORE i talked to you Guys.
    I came to you Guys for the 'Fixit' info...i believe it's a common problem with this unit.

    As i've paid you Guys to advise what's needed FixIt, can you please get the info to me....or tell me that you can't supply the info, in which case please tell me and avise how i get my funds back.

    I have 30+ of these units to repair !!!

    Regards,
    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 02, 2009

    Hi there....



    Here we go again........i'm quite capable of trawling the web & trying to find new power supplies....BUT i've contacted you guys because as you are professionals, I thought i'd PAY to find out the common problem with these power units...i have 30+ faulty at the College i work at in Birmingham, England.



    If you Guys don't know what the 'common-known' problems are with thse units, then i understand...the sooner you tell me you have no expertise on this subject the better....also, the link you provided for sourcing new units is not in the UK...so that's not an option.



    I have to be honest....there were so many of these units with the same fault that i believe is down to faulty capacitors....when they blow, there are going to be named common parts that need replacing....someone WILL know what's needed...i thought you guys would have the resource to know or find out.



    Put me out of my misery...if your organisation can't help or supply a 'Fix'....then say so & pass the fee back to me.....



    i do appreciate that you are trying to help, but it's the expert info that i'm after



    Regards,

    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 02, 2009

    Here we go again........i'm quite capable of trawling the web & trying to find new power supplies....BUT i've contacted you guys because as you are professionals, I thought i'd PAY to find out the common problem with these power units...i have 30+ faulty at the College i work at in Birmingham, England.

    If you Guys don't know what the 'common-known' problems are with thse units, then i understand...the sooner you tell me you have no expertise on this subject the better....also, the link you provided for sourcing new units is not in the UK...so that's not an option.

    I have to be honest....there were so many of these units with the same fault that i believe is down to faulty capacitors....when they blow, there are going to be named common parts that need replacing....someone WILL know what's needed...i thought you guys would have the resource to know or find out.

    Put me out of my misery...if your organisation can't help or supply a 'Fix'....then say so & pass the fee back to me.....

    i do appreciate that you are trying to help, but it's the expert info that i'm after

    Regards,
    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 02, 2009

    OK....you haven't read all the history on this one....it's a funny unusual small slim unit, FSP-250-50L.

    I've got 30+ of 'em all faulty...i know there will be a common fault...i really do not want to pay £75 or £100 each for them...i wantto repair them. Some Expert will know what needs replacing...that's WHY i'm calling on 'FixYa'.



    Also...the web site you give for replacements don't list any 'FSP' unit & i'm in England NOT the USA!!



    Can someone who has valid 'FIX' psu repair information please answer this OR if you have no expert i can trawl the web myself.



    I thought that this would be a quk route to getting the psu 'Fix' info.....but no one at 'FixYa' has the right information yet!!

  • chrisapadget Oct 02, 2009

    OK....you haven't read all the history on this one....it's a funny unusual small slim unit, FSP-250-50L.

    I've got 30+ of 'em all faulty...i know there will be a common fault...i really do not want to pay £75 or £100 each for them...i wantto repair them. Some Expert will know what needs replacing...that's WHY i'm calling on 'FixYa'.



    Also...the web site you give for replacements don't list any 'FSP' unit & i'm in England NOT the USA!!



    Can someone who has valid 'FIX' psu repair information please answer this OR if you have no expert i can trawl the web myself.



    I thought that this would be a quk route to getting the psu 'Fix' info.....but no one at 'FixYa' has the right information yet!!

  • chrisapadget Oct 03, 2009

    Getting Better....the web site you quote is one i've alreadsy visited...but not precise enough for fixing the specific power supply that is known acros the IT Industry for going faulty!!

    OK...now it's time to see if you guys are just web-browsers or really have an answer.....

    i need the typical failure components & a diagram to point me to a 'Fix'....i also note that today during my 'FixYa' advice...the internet browser states that you have at least 9 power supply specialists....no help yet from you guys....just lots of preamble

    If the next person can't get specific info on the fsp-250-50LA issues then lets give it a miss & as i've had no real help...just web browser generic stuff.....how do i get my money back....you guys remind me of myself...helpdesk people whose the web....no real specific people to help....

    Tell me i'm wrong...& give me the right answer..i'm getting fed-up with you guys trying to be nice..but not being helpfull for a specific fix...you appear to be a very misleading solution provider for any accurate specific fixes at present!!

    If you can't help...who do i report unsatisfactory performance to ??

  • chrisapadget Oct 03, 2009

    I am a repairer....jst need the common 'Fix' details for this particular power supply PLEASE !!

    If no ne has i...then pass me to a moderator...i'l have my fee back...the omly comments so far sre non-specific..& just pointers to web-sites i already know of.

    I'm looking for PSU EXPERTS here who know the common faults..in particuralr the silk screened component id's that gofaulty on this psu.

  • chrisapadget Oct 03, 2009

    Thanks,...but you not hitting the button.
    First there was a known problem with sub-standard Cap's going into PD=SU's...FSP units were hit heavily.
    I work asa a technician/Electronic service man for a B'ham College(UK).
    If you read all of my comments, you'll realise hat i'm used to repairing all sorts of electronic items...saved the colleg a fortune repairing an enormous batch of AOC Moniors!!

    So i've come to you guys for accurate 'fix' info for the known issues with these psu's. I know that they are repairable, as you can buy refurbished!!

    What i need is the information on the typically blown bits that need replacing...then i'll do it!!

    I have over 30 units all with the same problem....

    So....i thought i was coming to the experts...yourselves......I can chicken out & say buy new...but that's not professional.

    I can trawl the web....I can give the problem to someone else BUT I'M NOT GOING TO!!

    If you Guys at 'Fixya' havent got spoecific 'FIxya' details then i'm in the wrong place & please organise refunding my fee that was paid in good faith.

    No one on 'Fixya' yet seems to have ANY expert detailed info......please prove me wrong, but i'm getting fed-up of talking to people on 'FixYa' that have no knowleedge...just general advice & chit-chat!

    So it's stand up & be counted time...either give me correctdetailed info on coomon parts tht get blown & need replacing....or leave me alone & guve me my fee back!!

  • chrisapadget Oct 03, 2009

    Thanks,...but you not hitting the button.
    First there was a known problem with sub-standard Cap's going into PSU's...FSP units were hit heavily.
    I work as a technician/Electronic service man for a B'ham College(UK).
    If you read all of my comments, you'll realise hat i'm used to repairing all sorts of electronic items...saved the college a fortune repairing an enormous batch of AOC Monitors!!

    So i've come to you guys for accurate 'fix' info for the known issues with these psu's. I know that they are repairable, as you can buy refurbished!!

    What i need is the information on the typically blown bits that need replacing...then i'll do it!!

    I have over 30 units all with the same problem....

    So....i thought i was coming to the experts...yourselves......I can chicken out & say buy new...but that's not professional.

    I can trawl the web....I can give the problem to someone else BUT I'M NOT GOING TO!!

    If you Guys at 'Fixya' havent got specific 'FIxya' details then i'm in the wrong place & please organise refunding my fee that was paid in good faith.

    No one on 'Fixya' yet seems to have ANY expert detailed info......please prove me wrong, but i'm getting fed-up of talking to people on 'FixYa' that have no knowledge...just general advice & chit-chat!



    So it's stand up & be counted time...either give me correct detailed info on common parts that get blown & need replacing....or leave me alone & give me my fee back please!!

  • chrisapadget Oct 03, 2009

    Thanks,



    Now THAT'S what i call a good technical answer.....my confidence is restored.

    That will do me...i'm now on the case!!



    Resolution accepted....many thanks....



    Regards,

    Chris

  • chrisapadget Oct 03, 2009

    My confidence is restored...great stuff...i'm now on the case!!

    Regards,
    Chris

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8 Answers

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PSU should not be repaired. Often the replacement parts are not of very good quality. A repaired PSU can damage your computer's motherboard and other components.

I advise you to purchase another PSU of the same power rating.

First, make sure you computer is not damaged.

Next, remove the cables connecting the PSU to the motherboard and other components (like CD-ROM etc).

Then unscrew the screws attaching the PSU and remove it from the casing.

Dismantle the PSU and inspect any blown fuses. Frequently, a blown fuse is the cause of the PSU not working.

If the fuse is not blown and the PSU is damaged, take it to a computer hardware store and show the clerk, ask for PSU with equivalent power power rating.

Note: A PSU with higher power rating will cost you more with no extra benefit, but you nust definitely NOT purchase a one with a lower power rating. If the PSU is not available in your wattage rating then opt to buy a one with higher wattage rather than buying one with a lower wattage.

Let me know if you need more help regarding this matter.

Posted on Oct 03, 2009

  • Adnan Bhatti
    Adnan Bhatti Oct 03, 2009

    The most common failure is the switching transistors themselves. The transistors short-circuit, causing
    massive amounts of current to be drawn across the transformer and blowing the fuse.

    Transistor failure is often caused by bad capacitors. It is extremely common to find output filter capacitors that are swollen or leaking. Any capacitor that appears to be bad should be replaced. To prevent a
    recurrence of this all-to-common failure, output filter capacitors should
    be replaced with special "low ESR" (Equivalent Series Resistance)
    capacitors. These capacitors are specifically designed to handle the
    rigors of filtering in a switching supply. Most power supply
    manufacturers do not install low ESR capacitors as original equipment
    because they are somewhat more expensive that conventional capacitors.
    However, it is well worth the money to use them as replacement components
    as they will greatly extend the life of the power supply in the field.


    Diode failure is another common problem. There are quite a few diodes
    in a switching supply and failure of any one of them will cause the
    supply to blow the fuse or shut down. The most common diode failures are
    shorted +12 volt or -5 volt output rectifiers. Failure of these diodes
    will not blow the fuse. The supply simply detects the short and shuts
    itself down. Some of these failures may be caused by using the +12 or -5
    volt outputs to power coin door lamps. The -5 volt output is not over-
    current protected in all power supplies. A shorted lamp socket may blow
    the diode by drawing too much current from the supply. The +12 volt
    diodes may be blown if 6 volt bulbs are inadvertently used instead of 12
    volt bulbs. The high-voltage input diodes may also short-circuit. This
    is often accompanied by shorted switching transistors and will blow the
    fuse.


    Testing and Repair

    All testing is done with the power off. Start by testing the pair of
    switching transistors. These will be mounted on a heatsink that helps
    them run cooler. Test them by using an ohmeter or a digital multimeter
    set to the diode test range. Check each transistor for a short between
    emitter and collector. Replace any transistors you find to be bad.

    These transistors will always seem to test shorted between
    base and emitter when tested "in-circuit." When the switching
    transistors fail, they always short between emitter and collector. If
    you are in doubt, pull the transistors out of circuit to test them. If
    the transistors are shorted, the fuse will have blown. Be sure to test
    the high-voltage diodes as well. The high-voltage diodes are usually
    part of a bridge rectifier, although they may be individual diodes.

    Next, test the output rectifiers. There are three pairs of diodes to test.
    One pair is for the -5 volt output. These will be fairly small;
    approximately the same size as the ubiquitous 1N4004 with which we are
    all familiar. The +12 volt diodes are usually somewhat larger. The two
    +5 volt output diodes are housed together in a "dual-diode" package that
    looks very much like a transistor. Like the switching transistors, this
    diode package is mounted on a heatsink. It will generally have the diode
    schematic symbols printed on it. This diode will usually not test
    properly in-circuit. Testing can be simplified by unsoldering it with a
    "solder ******" instead of removing it completely from the printed
    circuit board. I have seen very few failures of the +5 volt output
    diodes. All diodes must be replaced with high-speed diodes or the power
    supply will generate excessive noise.

    Follow these tests by replacing all the output capacitors with low ESR
    caps and fire up the power supply. The supply should be tested under
    load. Use a 1 ohm, 50 watt resistor or equivalent as a "dummy load",
    connected between the +5 volt output and ground (DC COM). This will draw
    5 amps from the supply, which is adequate for test purposes. If the
    supply is still inoperative, the integrated circuit may be bad. Test the
    IC by removing it from the printed circuit board and installing it in a
    power supply that you know to be good. I have a spare power supply with
    a socket in it that I use exclusively to test integrated circuits. Just
    about all the supplies use the same IC; a type 494. Equivalent
    integrated circuits are: TL494CN, uA494, uPC494C, IR3MO2, and MB3759.
    The over-the-counter replacement for these is ECG1729.


    Minus 5 Volt Output Too High

    Most switching regulator power supplies have three DC outputs. One is the
    main +5 volt DC output that powers the computer system. The others are
    the +12 and -5 volt outputs. These DC outputs are often used to power the
    sound generating system and the audio amplifier itself. When you're
    testing a power supply, it's important to check all three of the outputs.
    This is especially true when you have a game that basically works okay
    but has distorted or missing audio.

    When a switching regulator power supply fails, all three outputs will
    usually drop to zero volts.
    Sometimes, however, the output voltage may rise. If you find that the +5
    VDC and +12 VDC outputs are normal but the -5 VDC output is too high
    (more than -6 VDC), try replacing the -5 output filter choke.

    It is easy to locate the -5 volt filter choke, even without a schematic
    diagram. Just follow the trace on the printed circuit board back from the
    -5 VDC output of the power supply. You will eventually come to a
    component that may look something like a capacitor but will be clearly
    labeled "L" on the board and will generally be accompanied by the
    schematic symbol for a coil as well. The coil is wound on a ferrite coil
    and is covered with a plastic sleeve that has been heat-shrinked over it.
    Examine the coil. If the heat-shrinked cover has been melted or is
    missing entirely, the coil may be bad.

    There are a couple of options for obtaining a replacement
    coil. The preferred method is to take the coil off a junk power supply.
    Alternately, you can pull the burned wire off the ferrite core and rewind
    the choke yourself using the appropriate gauge wire. There aren't that
    many turns of wire on it that you can't rewind a new coil in five minutes.



    Switching Regulator Power Supplies
    Output Capacitor Replacements

    Each power supply requires two of these.

    To make ordering and stocking easier, I use the same capacitor for both
    the +12 VDC and the -5 VDC outputs. It's a 1000 microfarad, 25 volt
    capacitor. The Nichicon part number is UVX1E102M. Although some power
    supplies use a 2200 microfarad capacitor for the +12 VDC output, I have
    found the 1000 microfarad to be perfectly satisfactory. Most power
    supplies use one capacitor each for the +12 VDC and -5 VDC outputs so
    order the same number of 1000 microfarad capacitors as you do the 3300
    microfarad capacitors. When you replace the output filter capacitors,
    it is a good idea to change them all at once.

    Switching Regulator Power Supplies
    Output Diode Replacements

    Output diodes are a common failure item in the switching regulator power
    supply. I would say that around twenty-five to thirty percent of them
    have bad output diodes.

    High Speed Diodes

    There are three pairs of output diodes; one pair for each of the outputs:
    +5 VDC, +12 VDC, and -5 VDC. These are not ordinary diodes. They are
    special, high-speed, "fast-recovery" diodes. High speed diodes are made
    to handle the very fast switching action (around 40 thousand cycles per
    second) of the power supply.

    I have rarely replaced the +5 volt diode assembly in a switching
    regulator power supply. The +12 and -5 volt output diodes are the most
    common failures. It is normal for these diodes to test bad when checking
    them "in-circuit." There is usually a low ohm resistor (normally around
    100 ohms) across the output of the power supply that causes a very low
    reading when checking the +12 or -5 volt output diodes. Most people
    unsolder and remove one end of each diode to test it but you can usually
    bypass this step. When these diodes fail they will generally short
    completely. Instead of reading around 100 ohms, you will get a reading of
    around zero ohms; a dead short!

    Substitute Diodes

    The +12 volt output diodes will usually carry an original part number
    like PXPR302 or FR302. These are 3 amp diodes. The -5 volt output diodes
    will often be type PXPR1502 or similar. Good engineering practice
    dictates that high speed, "fast-recovery" diodes be used in this circuit.



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It can be repaired by the hardware repair shop.the parts can be ordered from www.radioshack.com --------------------- thanks.keep updated.

Posted on Oct 03, 2009

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Hi,

We do not repair PSU's. But, if you wish i would help you to repair it. But, believe me, repair is costlier than to purchase a new one. That's why it is advisable to purchase a new one, There are so many power supply unit available in the market.

I would advise you to go for a Branded one. At least they would work for more than 5 years.

Hope i helped you.

Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!

Do accept the solution, if 100% satisfied from my service!!

Posted on Oct 02, 2009

  • taran_2005
    taran_2005 Oct 02, 2009

    Hi,


    I understand your concern. As we discuss, i can help you in repair than might be a new one. The best i could do for you, if you are satisfied, i could a place where you could get technical assistance for all your PSU ( Remember, you have 30 units and it is NOT easy to fix all 30 ). There are components that you need to replace and usually most of them are obsolete.

    I can refer you to :-

    http://www.com-com.co.uk/NEC/parts/FSP25...

    This is the only site that could help you to offer/replace/repair PSU at a cost which would not affect your pocket.

    Hope i helped you.

    Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!

    Do accept the solution, if 100% satisfied from my service!!


  • taran_2005
    taran_2005 Oct 02, 2009

    Hi,

    There is a nice troubleshooting guide :-

    http://repairfaq.ece.drexel.edu/sam/smps...

    You can check. If that not help, i would be able to assist further if you wanted to repair it yourself.

    Thanks.


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Yes you definately can replace the psu. Go to a website www.directron.com I've dealt with them for over 15 years now and if they don't have the part I need, they will order it for me. They are located about 15 minutes away from my house, and I can personally vouch for them. Whoever told you that they aren't repairable didn't know about your problem. It's only a [power supply and can be bought at about any computer store, best buy, newegg, j&R, anywhere that sells comoputers will be able to get you a new part.

Posted on Oct 02, 2009

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Hi,

All the component of the Power supply unit can be serviced and repaired.

First you have to check the number of components that has been damaged,
If the transformer is damaged or if more number of component is damaged its better to get a good new Power supply.

Else if its with the capacitor or some Small resistor, you can just open and change the component on your own, if you have a good soldering rods..

You can get the new power supply from the following link

http://www.powersourceonline.com/buy/FSP25050LA-b-en.jsa

Please leave comment, if you need further assistance
RNJ VINODKUMAR

Posted on Oct 01, 2009

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You can repair it. Take it to a computer repair shop and have the techs take a look at it, they can repair that kind of stuff no problem. It just needs a transformer and maybe a chip. It may even have a fuse on the board that's blown, have you looked it over yet?

Posted on Oct 01, 2009

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Hi, Chris.

Not certain what you mean by "end of life".

The power supply on that unit: AC - 50/60Hz 220 V and 250.0 Watt is not a repairable, but a replaceable part.

It is fairly straight-forward to replace, but if you are not comfortable "under the hood",
someone should assist you. All power needs to be disconnected from the power supply and the new power supply inserted and reconnected.

Hope this helps.

Posted on Oct 01, 2009

  • NinaE Oct 01, 2009

    Hi again, Chris.

    Sorry it's been so difficult for you.

    In what I have read, the power supply is a replaceable part.

    But, from your notes, you are saying that the power supply cannot be replaced ??


  • NinaE Oct 01, 2009

    Hi, Chris.

    Repairing power supplies ... something I have not done in my 25+ years of experience.

    But, I cannot answer that question for anyone else at FixYa.

    The way it works ... is that if one expert cannot answer, your question goes back to the "pool" of experts and the next person who feels they can answer, will answer your question.

    When I saw your header about a blown power supply and you wanted to fix it, I assumed your level of expertise was such that you needed to replace, not repair, the power supply.

    I believe your question is a bit unusual, so I will place your question in the Expert chat room. But, that is in addition to your process.


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Not usually. When power supply units (psu's) are manufactured the internal electronic components are often encased permanently in resin. This helps with heat dissipation and also gives the psu a greater resistance to being damaged by moisture and knocks/falls. The downside is as you've described: such types are not repairable when they fail.

If your psu is fairly heavy for it's size then it's almost certainly a resin-filled unit. If it's quite lightweight then there may be components which can be replaced but the usual failure is of one of the transformer windings or of one of the surface mounted electronic components on the internal circuit board. Diagnosing where the fault lies and then either bypassing it or replacing the transformer assembly usually costs far more than replacing the entire psu.

If the psu for your model is no longer available then any good electronics shop can usually supply you with a universal alternative: if you don't know exactly what you need then take along the broken psu and they can read the technical details on the casing to ensure you get the correct replacement.

Posted on Oct 01, 2009

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6ya6ya
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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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