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Restore vista How do I restore vista to the computer, I had windows xp installed and have lots of problems, I do not have a restore disc, I need a step by step to get to the partition and what to do once there to restore back to factory installed vista

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If you formatted your hard disk you may no longer return to your previous operating system, you need to reinstall vista. if you just installed with out reformatting you may press F8 upon booting and after reading all your hardware then select the O.S. (vista)

Posted on Dec 19, 2007

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SOURCE: I have freestanding Series 8 dishwasher. Lately during the filling cycle water hammer is occurring. How can this be resolved

Hi there,
Save hours of searching online or wasting money on unnecessary repairs by talking to a 6YA Expert who can help you resolve this issue over the phone in a minute or two.

Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repairmen in the US.

Here's a link to this great service

Good luck!

Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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I was wanting to do a systems recovery on my computer. It came with XP home ed. installed. Vista has been bought and installed, and XP completely wiped as far as I can tell. I don't have the Vista or...


do you have a recovery key (f1,f2 etc) for the desktop, it flashed when you boot your desktop, press that key, it will recover your desktop to the os installed from the factory, it will be windows xp home edition

Aug 03, 2011 | Dell Computers & Internet

Tip

How To Repair Your Operating System


A Repair Install will replace the system files with the files on the XP CD used for the Repair Install. It will leave your applications and settings intact, but Windows updates will need to be reapplied. Here is how to run an OS Repair using the Operating System CD in XP, Vista, or 7:


Windows XP

1. Boot the computer using the XP CD. You may need to change the boot order in the system BIOS so the CD boots before the hard drive. Check your system documentation for steps to access the BIOS and change the boot order.
2. When you see the "Welcome To Setup" screen, you will see the options below:

5ce0f01.gif

3. Press ENTER to start the Windows Setup.
4. Accept the License Agreement and Windows will search for existing Windows installations.
5. Select the XP installation you want to repair from the list and press R to start the repair. If Repair is not one of the options, END setup.
6. Setup will copy the necessary files to the hard drive and reboot. Do not press any key to boot from CD when the message appears. Setup will continue as if it were doing a clean install, but your applications and settings will remain intact.


Windows Vista

If you have a Windows Vista installation disc, you need to restart (boot) your computer using the installation disc. If you do not restart your computer from the disc, the option to repair your computer will not appear.

Here is a step by step picture guide.

If you have a Windows Vista installation disc:

1. Insert the installation disc.
2. Restart your computer.
3. Click the Start button, click the arrow next to the Lock button, and then click Restart.
4. If prompted, press any key to start Windows from the installation disc.


Windows 7

1. If a startup problem is detected, Startup Repair will start automatically and try to fix the problem.
2. If the problem is severe enough that Startup Repair doesn't start on its own and you can't access the System Recovery Options menu on your computer's hard disk, you can get to the menu and start Startup Repair by using the Windows installation disc or a system repair disc that you created earlier.

on Jul 13, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista





cf85f95.jpg


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.



Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.



Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.


To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
  1. Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
  2. Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
  3. Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.

Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space. Step 2: Install Windows 7 Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).

Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.) After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.

Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.


































on Jul 07, 2010 | Computers & Internet

2 Answers

Hello: I have a problem in my notebook hp dv4 1129la, the computer was working well but then suddendly I turned on and the OS couldn`t run, the sreen showed a message saying: no boot device found, insert...


Hi there !

Yes, it can be repair and all you need in Windows XP installer CD to repair your operating system and all your information will be brought back.

1. If you have the Windows XP installer CD, put in the CDROM drive and turn on your computer and try to make sure that it will boot up in your CDROM drive. A message will display " press any key to boot to CD" and press any key.

2. After it will go to Windows XP set up and below instruction will appear:

a. To set up Windows XP now, press Enter
b. To repair Windows XP installation using recovery console, press R
c. To quit set up without installing Windows XP, press F3

Since you want to repair it, you should press R to repair and it will not delete your files on that partition.

3. After that just go on through the process and after repairing it will reboot itself and run Windows XP.

I hope it helps you. Good Luck and Thank you for using FixYa !

Jan 06, 2011 | HP Computers & Internet

1 Answer

My laptop gets stuck on welcome screen, I don't know how to system restore/recovery!


May have to contact the manufacturer for a recovery/restore disc or the installation discs for the operating system (i.e. windows 7, vista, or xp for instance).

You'll have to boot from these discs, which are nowadays not included with the computer as most problems can be resolved by going to the restore/recovery console after booting to windows (which you can't do).

Good luck on this repair.

Dec 14, 2010 | Computers & Internet

Tip

How to Dual Boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista


If you're dying to try out Windows 7 but aren't ready to give up your installation of XP or Vista, let's take a look at how to dual boot Windows 7 with XP or Vista.
Step 0: Download the Windows 7 Beta and Burn It to a DVD
Assuming you've already downloaded a fresh copy of Windows 7, you'll need to burn it to a DVD in order to do a fresh installation. To handle this task, grab a copy of the most popular CD and DVD burning tool ImgBurn, burn the ISO to a DVD, and move right along to step 1.

Step 1: Partition Your Hard Drive
Before you go installing Windows 7, the first thing you need to do is create a new partition on your hard drive to hold the new installation of Windows. Partitioning your hard drive will vary depending on whether you're running XP or Vista—namely because Vista has a partition tool baked in, XP does not.
Partition Your Hard Drive in XP
To partition your hard drive in Windows XP, you'll need to download some sort of third-party partitioning software. There are a lot of options available, but I prefer to stick with the previously mentioned GParted live CD, a free, open source boot CD that can handle all kinds of partitioning duties.
To use it, just download the GParted Live CD, burn it to a CD, then reboot your computer (booting from the disc). You'll boot right into the partitioning tool. HowtoForge's previous guide to modifying partitions with GParted is a great place to start, but it's a fairly basic procedure:
Resize your current OS drive to free up enough space for a Windows 7 partition (the minimum system requirements ask for 16GB).
Create a new partition from the newly freed space.
Apply your changes.
Partition Your Hard Drive in Vista
The folks at Redmond were kind enough to include a disk partitioning tool in Vista if you know where to look. So go to Control Panel -> System and Maintainence (skip this one if you're in Classic view) -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management. Once you launch the Computer Management tool, click on Disk Management under the Storage heading in the sidebar. It's partitioning time.
Luckily we've already gone down this road before in step-by-step detail, complete with pictures, so check out our previous guide to creating a new partition in Vista. In a nutshell, you'll need to shrink your current OS partition to free up at least 16GB of disk space (per the Windows 7 minimum system requirements), then create a "New Simple Volume" from the free space.
Step 2: Install Windows 7
Now that you've done all the heavy lifting, it's time for the easy part: Installing Windows 7 on your new partition. So insert your Windows 7 disc and reboot your computer (you'll need to have enabled booting from your DVD drive in your system BIOS, but most PCs will have this enabled by default).
Once the DVD boots up it's a simple matter of following along with the fairly simple installation wizard. When you're choosing installation type, be sure to select Custom (advanced) and choose the partition you set up above. (Be careful here. Choosing the wrong partition could mean wiping your other Windows installation altogether, so make sure you pick the new partition you just created.)
After you select the partition, go grab yourself a drink and let the installer do its work. Windows will run through some installation bits, restart a few times in the process. Eventually you'll be prompted to set up your account, enter your license key, and set up Windows. Keep your eyes open for fun new Windows 7 features, like your new homegroup (and the accompanying password). When it's finished, you're up and rolling with your new Windows 7 installation.
Congratulations! You should now have a new entry for Windows 7 on your boot screen when you first start up your computer. You've now got all the tools necessary to dual-boot Windows 7 and XP or Vista—or even to triple-boot Windows 7, Vista, and XP.

on Dec 08, 2009 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Program which has lost its path.


Hai,

It sounds like you are very much familier with computer and you do not what exactly needs to be done, no problem we are here to help you.
If the problem is not more than 14 days then, I suggest you restore the computer else.
Please uninstall the game or application that you are facing the problem with, if this could not fix the issue then I suggest you format the computer and reinstall the operating system, to reinstall the operating system I will provide you a weblink which has detailed information on installation of XP.

http://www.petri.co.il/install_windows_xp_pro.htm

similarly you can find vista and windows 7 installation guides, please make a note of the steps and perform the installation.

This should fix the issue.
Bye, take care

Feb 02, 2010 | Microsoft Windows Vista Ultimate Edition

1 Answer

I can't get my system recovery disk to work so i can restore my computer to the orginal format


If your recovery CDs have failed you have some options

1. you can call the company who made your computer about a new set of restore discs

2. you can buy an operating system disc such as XP or vista

XP or Vista , Operating System Installation CD will setup the computer nicely , you may need drivers for certan things but not likely.


Malfunctioning restore CDs really **** me off

I just chunk em and load my XP pro disc

( multi machine volume license required if you wanna put it on multible computers )
( same with vista )

but in some cases you may find that XP pro will install on many machines just fine.


Thank you for using FixYa!



Az.

Sep 18, 2008 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Thamks


Hello Dean

In Ideal scenarios your Restore Disks should work even if you have the Vista on the computer.
I hope you are using the right steps in order to perform that restore as you need to boot up using the disk 1.

Another step you can do is to Reinstall the XP using a disk(Which you may borrow from someone) after formating the harddrive, however you will have to reinstall all the software programs and the drivers as well.

Hope this helps.
Regards
Sammy

Jul 10, 2008 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional With...

2 Answers

Not possible xp installation


How to Downgrade Vista to XP Downgrading from Windows Vista to Windows XP is almost like installing Windows XP for the first time. You should take all the normal precautions like backing up all your important files and record important passwords in a different place, preferably on a CD. When you downgrade from Windows Vista to XP, note that Windows Vista will be completely removed from your system.
(Note: There is a way to have both Vista and XP in a dual boot configuration, but that's an option for more advanced users. See Dual Booting Vista and XP for more info on that.)
Before you begin the XP installation, make sure that the necessary XP hardware drivers are available, or included on the XP disk provided by your PC vendor. If in doubt, check the vendor's website or poke around with your favorite search engine to see if others have attempted the XP install on the same hardware. You may be able to install XP without all the needed drivers, but some hardware may not work afterwards.
Also, make sure that you have a genuine Windows XP CD before you begin the downgrade. Be sure to read the section earlier in this article to see if you qualify for a low/no cost XP recovery disk from your PC vendor. If not, perhaps you have an XP disc that came with another computer. If you've upgraded an existing computer from XP to Vista, the best choice would be the XP install/recovery disc that came with that computer. One some PC's the vendor doesn't ship a CD, but the recovery CD can be created from disk images on the hard drive. If all else fails, you can always buy a copy of Windows XP on Ebay. Just be sure it's a legal, licensed copy.
Follow these steps to install Windows XP on your Vista machine:
  • Insert your Windows XP install/recovery CD and restart your computer.
  • Install Windows XP normally, providing either the product key that came with the disk, or the one you got from Microsoft customer support. If the installer warns you that another copy of Windows is already installed, don't worry. Remember, this install will wipe out your existing Vista installation.
  • Activate your copy of Windows XP when it prompts you to do so. If you run into the "already activated" problem, you can use the option to activate by phone.
  • If you own Vista Business or Vista Ultimate, explain to the rep that you want to use your Downgrade Rights to install XP Pro.
  • If you own Vista Home Basic/Premium, or you are installing XP Home Edition, don't mention ANYTHING about Vista. Just give the rep your XP product key (not the Vista key), explain that you are installing XP on a new hard drive, and tell them you need to activate.

Mar 30, 2008 | Computers & Internet

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