Question about Personal Radios

Open Question

Stereo receiver crackling noise

When adjusting (turning) the volume on my receiver (20 yrs old) I receive sound and a crackling noise from the speakers whether it's radio, CD or casette. If I play with it enough I can get it to a level where the sound is working with no crackling or interference. Is there a simple fix to this? Perhaps I can clean some contacts? Any suggestions would be much appreciated....thanks in advance

Posted by on

5 Suggested Answers

  • 494 Answers

SOURCE: My sony icf 7600 AM/FM/SW/radio can not catch any channel.

Sony radios of this era had notorious capacitor problems.... also several other brands were affected. These capacitors were underrated and the technology to make them was not at it's best back then. The cure is to replace the capacitors on the board with new electrolytics. About 28 of them need to be replaced but the big problem is to find someone to do this. the original capacitors are surface mount and must be removed and new radial lead caps put in their place, some are rather tough to get at and the new ones have to be placed carefully. My SONY ICF-SW7600 now works as new and maybe even better!
I have done this myself as I have skills working with surface mount capacitors. I offer my services to those who cannot find service for their radios. Please email me for details, I am not into making bucks on this, I just want to see these radios kept working and bringing enjoyment to their owners.
Good DXing Rod KB8DNS (also copied and paste)

Posted on Jun 17, 2009

  • 1635 Answers

SOURCE: volume control

Go to the local TV service store and ask the tech if he can clean the control with some contact cleaner.

If the cleaning does not fix it, then there may be a cold solder connection under the control, or the control itself may be defective and require to be changed.

Jerry G.

Posted on May 17, 2008

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: Grundig YB 400PE

Some Grundig models have a history of being friend by just small amounts of static electricity such as walking across a rug. It wipes out the tuning circuit.

Posted on Aug 14, 2009

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: AM/FM stereo receiver

Possible solution. I have fixed two with this problem. When the radio drops to a hard surface, the ferrite coil antenna is the heaviest component on circuit board. Look for cracks in solder or broken wires where attachments to circuit board occurs for this component. Use a fine point soldering iron with low heat.

Posted on Dec 20, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: I recently was given a

I don't know what to do, but if you are unable to get a reasonable fix, i would like to buy the remote from you. Let me know at

Posted on Feb 21, 2011

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%


Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add


1 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Can I connect my digital receiver to my grundig ghc 1000 home theater? And how I can make the connection?

That depends on the make and model of the radio, and the available inputs on the GHC1000. Does your radio have a line output socket? If not, you can generally use the headphone socket to source a signal. Then all you'll need is a cable with a 3.5mm stereo plug on one end and two x RCA plugs at the other - easily available at low cost from an electronics store. The RCA plugs go to a free line input on the Grundig amplifier and the 3.5 mm plug goes into the radio's headphone socket. HOWEVER some radios require a DC return path to detect that there is something plugged into the socket. You Grundig cannot provide this, and if your radio needs it, this method will not work. So hopefully your radio will not need it.....

By the way, you will have to experiment with the volume setting on the radio if you decide to try connecting it this way and find that it does work. Set too low there will be insufficient audio to run the Home Theater at reasonable volume, too high and you'll get distorted sound. Trial and error is the way to go, but start with the Grundig's volume control set to a low level and the radio's volume control set about half way - to protect your speakers from potential damage if you accidentally drive them too loud

Oct 08, 2013 | Personal Radios


10 Tips for the PSK31 Digital Mode

PSK31 is arguably the most popular amateur radio
digital mode. It utilized phase-shift-keying to
provide robust, narrow signal width communications,
and requires very little power to QSO the world!

- Use the center of your waterfall. Testing will
show that your transmit (TX) and receive (RX)
will be strongest there. Don’t blindly use 1000Hz
tone or strictly follow the VFO ‘set it and forget it'
concept. You can easily lose 20% or more of
your power on each edge of your pass band.
Pass band centering of the signal will give the
best results of both RX and TX.

-There's no need to have the waterfall streaking
bright red. Set your rig's volume to a low level
(less than 25% of max) and adjust your waterfall
and soundcard levels for a good contrast. Do not
overdrive your soundcard! Get the background
noise and the transmit trace well defined and
separate. Keep in mind, how your waterfall looks
does not impact decoding, but it is harder to work
it if you can’t see it.

- Use UPPER CASE characters sparingly. Lower
case text in PSK31 varicode transmits fewer bits
of data, thus you'll increase transmit speed and
improve the likelihood of proper decoding on the
other end. For example, the difference of a
lowercase e and an uppercase E is five times
more bits! (e=11 vs. E=1101101101)

- Enable your RF Attenuation and increase the
volume. This helps keep a strong signal from
wiping out the weaker ones. Attenuation will
probably be around 20 dB, but by dropping the
noise level, the signal readability improves. AGC
(auto gain control) does nothing for a weak
signal; it only levels the louder ones.

- Use your digital modes software, or a program
like Spectrogram, to see what you noise level is
with the radio off. This will give you an idea of
how 'clean' your soundcard is. Typically,
onboard (built-in) sound hardware (as found in
most 'mainstream' computers like Dell or HP)
does not have a signal-to-noise ratio as good as
an inexpensive (less than $50) separate
soundcard. When purchasing a soundcard, look
for something with over 100 signal-to-noise ratio
in the specifications.

- Consider dual monitors (most modern video
cards have two jacks). This allows you to have
the waterfall or spectrum display on one screen,
and your logger, text window, etc. on the other. It
makes a huge difference in speed and ease-ofuse
when you don't have to swap between
screens or use smaller windows for your QSO.

- Keep your ALC reading during transmit to as
close to zero as possible. This will keep your
signal clean and your IMD at a good level (-20s
or better is ideal). Your power output will drop,
but there's no need to 'smoke' the transmit level.
PSK31 is about an 80% duty cycle. Even with a
full duty cycle rig, it still needs to dissipate heat!
Besides, 20 watts more makes little difference.
Output of around 50W is enough to work the
world, and your fellow CQs will appreciate the
courtesy. Also be sure your voice processor is
NOT enabling when using digital modes.

- Ask for an RSQ (readability, strength, quality)
report! When in a QSO, send just a tone and ask
for your IMD and a report on how your trace
looks. This will give you a better idea of
adjustments needed.

- There are hundreds of digital modes. To get
started or to learn more about the most common
ones, acquire ARRL’s ‘HF digital handbook’ by
Steve Ford, WB8IMY. For the technical types, be
sure to snag Roland Prosch’s (DF3LZ) ‘Technical
Handbook for Radio Monitoring’.

- Try 30 meters PSK31! It’s a robust band, offering
the best of 20M and 40M. It’s a small segment of
a no contesting band. Used only for digital
modes and CW. Be sure to operate within your
privileges. PSK31 can typically be found around


AGC (Auto Gain Control): The ability to reduce
signal strength on-the-fly (fast or slow), giving you a
more level audio reception on stronger stations.

ALC (Auto Level Control): A voltage adjustment or
reading, indicating your TX signal levels . ALC is
designed to control voice and carrier signal levels,
not digital modes. Typically, if the ALC meter moves,
then the microphone gain is too high.

Signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio: A comparison of the
signal levels to the relative noise level. Ideally, a
perfect signal would have no noise, but realistically,
you’ll want a S/N ratio well within the tolerances of
the mode you’re using. PSK31 tolerates about a
10dB S/N ratio.

dB: Sound level, or ‘decibels’ are used to measure
the relative strength of a signal.

Digital Mode: A converted signal transmitted from
your radio to be ‘de-converted’ by the receiving
station. Much like a computer modem, a digital feed
is converted to analog, sent across a transmission
medium, then reconverted back to a readable signal
at the receiving station.

Duty cycle: The total time of actual transmission
levels. When your radio is transmitting, there’s an
on/off process that takes place. Transmitting at a
100% duty-cycle indicates that your are using 100%
of your radio’s power, 100% of the time. Better
radios will allow this, while others will eventually fail
under the pressure of such a load.

IMD (Intermodulation Distortion): The ratio, in dB,
used to determine the quality of your transmission.
Unwanted ‘products’ or signals reduces IMD levels.
More power does not mean better copy!

Overdrive: Turning the volume of your radio up so
high that you risk damage to the soundcard, or cause
signal ‘splatter’. Similar to maintaining your ALC

Pass band: The range that your transceiver can
receive when on a single frequency. Typically
around 3000Hz wide.

PSK (Phase Shift Keying): A form of modulation
that shifts the transmit signal in order to carry more
information. PSK31: is a digital mode created in the
1990’s by Peter Martinez (G3PLX) that is about 31Hz
wide on your waterfall.

RF (Radio Frequency) Attenuation: A suppression
of signals received. You’ll often see a noise level
reduction, with a minor sacrifice to the desired signal
reception. Check your radio’s manual on how to
adjust it.

RSQ (Readability, Strength, Quality): Much like the
familiar ’RST’ reports, using a 599-type reporting
scheme. Instead of ‘Tone’ (Morse Code), use
’Quality’. 95%+ readable, with a very strong waterfall
trace, and a clean (no splatter) signal would warrant
a 599 report.

Soundcard: A piece of hardware in your computer
that produces sound, and often allows input, as with
a microphone.

VFO (Variable Frequency Oscillator): It’s that knob
you use to change frequencies on your radio.

Varicode: A streamlined coding system that allows
nearly whatever your computer keyboard can type to
be transmitted in shorter lengths.

Waterfall: A visual display of radio signals (and other
sounds) found on the tuned frequency.


ARRL’s ’HF Digital Handbook’,
by Steve Ford, WB8IMY

‘Technical Handbook for Radio Monitoring I’,
Roland Prosch’s (DF3LZ)

Digital Master 780, by Simon Brown, HB9DRV

Spectrogram and other software:

on Apr 28, 2010 | Personal Radios

2 Answers

No low volume

known bug electrolytic capacitor+eeprom store, remove power+batteries and store min 1 week without power!!

Dec 03, 2011 | Sangean ATS 909 AM/FM/SW Radio

1 Answer

Receiving AM & FM stations but NO AUDIO OUTPUT

Please post the make and model number of your radio to help us help you.
The more information you provide, the more specific and accurate our solutions can be.

Apr 15, 2010 | Personal Radios

1 Answer

Why do we have radio interference when floresenct lights are on. when we turn the lights on in our garage cannot get any radio station just static

Florescent lights are notorious for making RF noise! It is the way the lights work and there is no real way to eliminate the problem except to replace the lights or not use them. On the radio's side, the design of the receiver will either keep the noise out or magnify it and there is not a whole lot one can do about this!
To lessen the radio from receiving the noise, move the location of the radio or use an external antenna. Some times a filter can decrease the level of noise.

Jan 02, 2010 | Emerson Personal Radios

2 Answers

Get a lot of static when try and turn volume down fact, sometimes it is hard to get sound when you turn the volume is either full blast or silent.....lots of static like noise when...

This is an easy fix with a can of volume knob cleaner i think its called. You should be able to get it at radio shack. You just spray it into the volume knob and let it dry. The instructions are on the can.

Dec 03, 2009 | Tivoli Kloss Model One AM/FM Radio

1 Answer

Need to make sure programmed

Program the Midland 74-109 Weather Radio
a) Turn unit on. Extend the antenna. Adjust volume up slowly; Do you hear anything? If not, try replacing the 9 volt battery with a fresh one, in the accessible battery compartment underneath the unit. Repeat above steps.
b) If no sound is heard, turn unit over and look for "WEATHER" slide switch on bottom. With unit on & volume adjusted to comfortable hearing level, slowly slide switch down (or up) through various frequencies [1)162.550, 2) 162.400, 3) 162.475, 4) 162.425, 5) 162.450, 6) 162.500, 7) 162.525] until voice transmissions are heard. This should be the closest National Weather Service (NWS) broadcast for your area. Check the NWS website at for your state, click on the state name, and look for the site name or site location nearest you. The frequency for that site should be the strongest, and appropriate for your area.
c) You can set the alert tone, for special weather alert broadcasts, on the bottom of the unit on the slide switch marked "ALERT". Set the switch to the desired type of alert: 1) LED [LED on top of unit (marked ALERT) lights up when alert is broadcast-no siren tone/alarm is heard] 2) LED & ALARM [LED lights up and alarm/ siren tone is heard] 3) VOICE [LED on top of unit lights up and voice broadcast is heard, only; no siren tone/alarm is heard].
d) Be sure to press the "ALERT" button on top of the unit and leave the volume at a comfortable listening level to hear weather alerts for your area (Alert LED on top of unit lights up to show Alert function is active). You can test the present volume level by pressing the "TEST" button. Be sure to press the "ALERT" button again after listening to the volume level to re-set the Alert function. You can listen to weather broadcasts anytime, by pressing the "WEATHER" button. After listening, be sure to re-press the "ALERT" button to reset the Alert function.
e) 9 volt battery life should last about 6 to 7 months, depending on how much unit is used an number of alerts received. Replace battery every 6 months, or when you replace your smoke alarm battery, or at beginning and end of daylight savings time. A 12 volt AC adapter to replace the battery, can be used. One should have been supplied with unit. If not, a replacement can be found at Radio Shack.
f) This should complete your Midland Weather Alert Radio Model 74-109 programming.

Apr 09, 2009 | Midland 74-109 Weather Radio

1 Answer

AM/FM stereo receiver often fully "drops" the reception of listened to radio station(s), or reception will often decrease in volume. Repositioning of the receiver's connected antenna wire often has no...

Possible solution. I have fixed two with this problem. When the radio drops to a hard surface, the ferrite coil antenna is the heaviest component on circuit board. Look for cracks in solder or broken wires where attachments to circuit board occurs for this component. Use a fine point soldering iron with low heat.

Oct 12, 2008 | Personal Radios

1 Answer

Volume control

Go to the local TV service store and ask the tech if he can clean the control with some contact cleaner.

If the cleaning does not fix it, then there may be a cold solder connection under the control, or the control itself may be defective and require to be changed.

Jerry G.

May 17, 2008 | Sony Walkman SRF-M35 AM/FM Radio

2 Answers

No reception sometimes

Either this is typical shortwave reception characteristics, or you intermittent antenna connection.

Sep 23, 2007 | Sangean ATS 808A AM/FM/SW Radio

Not finding what you are looking for?
Personal Radios Logo

Related Topics:

406 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Personal Radios Experts


Level 3 Expert

7983 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers


Level 3 Expert

93922 Answers

Are you a Personal Radio Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides