Question about Bushnell Optics

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My Bushnell: 9-27x25 (13-92750). My problem is that at 9x the image is good. When I increase the power above 9x I have two images. The left eye image is significantly below the right eye image. Can this be repaired? And, where? Glenn Taylor (gmtaylor@netscape.ca)

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  • gmtaylor419 Sep 28, 2009

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GlenUp to nine X, there may not be so much of noticeable astigmatism as it is above 9 X. Means that the focusing after 9X is so much off that it becomes very noticeable. The only answer to this problem is to get it rectified by a professional who has all the equipment to handle such jobs. Will cost you but it would be money well spent.

Posted on Sep 28, 2009

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We have a bushnell 78-8831 telescope, after assembly we still cannot view any images.


1. use the lowest power eyepiece (highest number in mm)
2. Point the scope towards a object (about 1000yds) away during the day and see if you can focus on the object. If you can not see anything during the day there is a problem either with the scope or set-up
3. Align the finder to the daylight object so it is ready for night viewing.
4. First night object should be the moon. Easy to find. ( A full moon presents poor seeing but this is just to get used to the scope.
5. Once the above steps are completed, use a good star program to find interesting objects (Stellarium, Cartes du Soliel, C2A are all freeware)
6. If you can not see the daytime object, remove the eyepiece and look down the focus tube. You should see a reflection of your eye in the primary mirror. If not, the primary and/or secondary mirror need to be collimated (aligned) refer to your owners manual.

Jul 12, 2011 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

1 Answer

My bushnell night vision is blurd nothing to see..what should i do?


Hello, when you turn on you Bushnell NV devise does the green come on , looking through eye piece. If it a white oval screen, then check the batteries and make sure the polarity is correct.
If you don't have the green screen in the image tube. Then it not working normally and they is a good possibly that the image intensifier tube is bad. Contact Bushnell ask them what it cost to repair it. stewbison

May 24, 2011 | Bushnell Night Vision Goggles 1x20

1 Answer

Left lens no clear view and both lenses blink


What color is it when you turn on you Bushnell binoculars? I think this Bushnell 26-3150 is a digital NV devise that uses CCTV image tube. In other words, it not anolog operation, but uses a digital devise to convert the iit (image intensifier tube) analog signal to a digital signal. There are advantages using digital signal, increase pixel rate, low power comsuption, etc. stewbison. Call Bushnell Night Vision and listen what they have say on this matter. stewbison.

May 20, 2011 | Bushnell 26-3150 Nightvision

1 Answer

I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

1 Answer

Why can't I see anything? I have removed the lens cover (the whole thing). When I take the eye piece out adn look through the focusing mechanism I can see light and very small images. When I put the eye...


Put the eyepiece with the largest number written on it into the scope and try again. Contact Bushnell directly for repairs:

http://www.opticsplanet.net/bushnell-warranty.html

Sep 21, 2010 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8846 (675 x 114mm)...

1 Answer

Will not focus, only light comes through, no image at all


All the manuals for Bushnell telescopes are located on this web site- look down the page for your model telescope:
http://www.opticsplanet.net/bushnell-warranty.html

Put the eyepiece with the LARGEST number written on it into the focuser, this is your lowest magnification.

Take the scope outside during the daytime and practice focusing on a distant object. Turn the focus knob slowly while keeping your eye on the eyepiece, watching closely for a focused image.

Read my TIPS on my profile page.

Aug 11, 2010 | Bushnell 570x60 Voyager Rotary Refractor...

1 Answer

We gave our son a pair of Bushnell Binoculars, and we are having difficulty getting a good image. We have carefully followed the instructions with no luck. The problem is that we are getting a double...


The binoculars need collimation. The two sides are supposed to be parallel, if they are not you see two heads on horses, two footballs, two baseball bats etc. Check the binoculars for any external signs of damage. Are the front housings sitting properly in the body, is one of them not straight? If there is no obvious signs then you will need to take them to someone who can rebuild them for you. Usually the place where you bought them should be able to help you with a repair centre.

Dec 30, 2009 | Bushnell Falcon 13-3450 (10x50) Binocular

1 Answer

Why is my picture upside down during the daytime ? on box says reflector. am i wrong when i had read that these have view as you would with binoculars


All astronomical telescopes have upside down images. There is no up or down in space; and it requires more glass elements to turn the image upright. More glass means less light will reach your eye.


Nov 15, 2009 | Bushnell Voyager Series 675 x 4.5...

1 Answer

Images viewed are upside down


oh this is normal,because when looking at stars it really doesnt matter if they are inverted,but by leaving out the erecting lenses you get more light and less distortion. so you need an erecting lense to see images in the daytime,call bushnell@18004233537,im sure they can sell you the right adaptable piece....good luck...larry@reichinstruments.com

Nov 24, 2008 | Bushnell NorthStar 78-8831 (525 x 76mm)...

3 Answers

Downloading image view binocular software


I lost the software and manual for my Bushnell Image View 10x25. How can I get another?

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