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Looking for a heat and wire setting chart for different metal thicknesses for my lincoln 220 mig welder

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Open the lid were u replace the wire it shud be on the underside of the lid

Posted on Sep 27, 2009

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My wire feed welder wont slow down. I was welding some thick galvanized pipe and went to turn the wire feed down and it didn't work


the speed feed rheostat(control) is shorted or you've got a short on the board if it has one. Hopefully just your switch. Check for a short from the switch to the drive motor. Remember, electricity can and will kill you. Be safe
Bryan

Nov 04, 2013 | Lincoln Electric Lincoln Easy MIG 140...

1 Answer

I am trying to locate a chart that would have the recommended operator control settings for different types & thickness of metals using my Snap-On YA 212A Ind. Mig wire welder.


See if your local welding supplier has a welding guide available. Some even include them as part of their catalog.

There is no real hard and fast absolte rule when welding with Mig. If you weld outside, and in the country where line voltage can vary, what worked well a day ago may not work well today. Those tables are only a rough guide at best, and while useful to you starting out, after a time when you are used to your welder, you will not need it.

What the weld looks like from the back side can tell you more useful information than you might get from a simple arbitrary table.

The best guide- experience. Start welding up scrap to get used to the welder, and get used to the sound of frying bacon or eggs. Then you can rely on your own judgement instead of feeling a need to refer to a book each time.

What the simple rule of thumb is, pick a heat range you think you need to use, then grab some scrap and lay out a bead adjusting the wire speed until you hear it sound like bacon on the frying pan. Then you adjust your speed to the thickness of the metal to achieve full *********** and ideally the back side looking like the front side. If not enough ***********- go up a heat range, and reset wire speed and try again.

When I was doing industrial welding for a grain handling equipment company I moved all around the shop and ended up on many different machines. None of them operated with the identical settings of the others even though a couple of them were of the same manufacture..

Dec 31, 2011 | Welding Tools

1 Answer

Have a lincoln sp200. Trying to run aluminum wire not having any luck. I am running straight argon gas, I get basically a glow the wire melts no penetration. Do I need to reverse polarity or what. I...


Hi:

You should only reverse polarity only if, before you were using innershield wire on the same MIG welder.
Your gun should be connected to + and ground to negative and you should use a spool gun for it.

Argon gas is ok, but for thick metals 1/4" and above you should use a mix of 75/25 argon/helium.

Good luck!

Jul 10, 2011 | Lincoln Welding Tools

1 Answer

Same problem here...using proper gas, more heat (setting 4) should penetrate better, no? have lots of flow from blueshield 8 bottle. What gives?


Your machine is rated for less than 1/8" thick metal welding. The only way you can have a depper penetration is by using innershield wire instead of metal core one. Innershield wire does not require gas and it will melt at lower heat.

Dec 31, 2010 | Campbell Hausfeld WG2060 Mig/Flux Versa -...

1 Answer

I have a lincoln mig 175 220v and know what settings i need for a specific material...i had to use its digital big brother and need to know how its settings compare to the smaller version


Smaller version will be the lincoln 140 and is a 110V unit. You can find the user manual for free at www.lincolnelectric.com settings are not the same, but the chart will tell you according to material thickness and wire size and gas used.

Dec 18, 2010 | Lincoln Welding Tools

1 Answer

How do you ignite a Lincoln Electric Welder???


You don't need an striker with a MIG welder just hook the ground cable to the base metal point the nozzle where you want to weld and pull the trigger and it will weld. Household current will run a MIG welder Take a look at the plug on the welder if it will pug into a 110v outlet you are all set, but most likely you will need a 220v outlet and maybe as much as an electric dryer type outlet. 

It takes a lot of practice to be a decent welder you also need to know what voltage and wire speed settings to use for a given thickness and type of material. 

You don't mention shielding gas, if you are using a flux core wire you don't need it, but if you are using regular wire you do. 

If I may make a suggestion, If you really want to learn how to weld, find a community college near you and take an introductory welding class. You will get a wealth of information and practice on different welding processes. The instructor will work with you and get you welding much better and faster than you will on your own. Most importantly you will get a lot of safety information.

This is a good introductory book:
http://www.amazon.com/Welders-Handbook-RevisedHP1513-Cutting-Oxyacetylene/dp/1557885133/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_1

Mar 03, 2010 | Lincoln Electric LINK2400-+1 CV-305 MIG...

2 Answers

Mig welding 1/16 thick metal


you should run power between 160-180 to get a godd weld with out burning your work

Jul 01, 2009 | Campbell Hausfeld RBWG202000 NA 70 Amp....

1 Answer

My lincoln welder lost its heat penetration


It only produces 100amps. You can only weld thinner metal 3/16" comfortably. Any thicker will resuld in less/no penetration.

Mar 17, 2009 | Welding Tools

1 Answer

Trying to weld with Hobart 125 EZ


If you are using flux wire and not shielding gas, your clamp should be positive and the wire should be negative. Heat is provided by the electrical arc that happens between the wire and the material. Your welder by itself does not pre heat the material and with 3/16 material you should not need to preheat anyway.

The electrical arc is kept consistent by adjusting the wire feed rate and the current applied. You will need to experiment with these settings to find what works best with your welder. For this welder and 3/16 material, I would suggest you start at the upper end of the current scale and about a third of the way up on wire speed. The welder might have a chart for these settings in the manual or inside cover.

If the wire feeds too fast, it will push the probe around and you will feel pressure as the wire feeds out. If the speed is too slow you will get large spatters and intermittent arcs. When properly adjusted the arc will sound even and consistent. The arc gap should always be about 1/8 of an inch.

To maintain enough heat for good penatration, do not move the probe too fast, work in a pattern and watch the weld pool (melted metal) and not the arc. Watching the weld pool will clue you in if you are moving too fast or too slow.

I hope this helps.

-Scott

Feb 03, 2009 | Hobart Handler 125 Ez

2 Answers

Mig Question


MIG stands for Metal Inert Gas welding, many times called Wire-feed.. Also referred as GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding). The "Metal" refers to the wire which is what is used to start the arc. It is shielded by inert gas and the feeding wire also acts as the filler rod. A semi-automatic process, it is fairly easy to learn and use.

Aug 27, 2008 | Lincoln Electric LINK2400-+1 CV-305 MIG...

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