Question about Nikon COOLPIX P80 Digital Camera

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When I use the flash the front of the picture is very bright and the background is very dark.

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That's normal. It's called the inverse-square law. When using a camera-mounted flash, you have to decide what you want to expose for.

Posted on Dec 26, 2009

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: Flash makes my pictures too bright/too dark

u might want to try and put a coffee filter over your flash when you take pictures to make the flash less bright. it sounds really silly but it actually works.

Posted on Jan 07, 2008

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1 Answer

Why when taking a picture is the background of the picture flashing


If the image you see in the camera display flashes then it's an over/under exposure warning feature that's turned on in your camera. It's there to tell you when an area of your picture is either too dark or too bright. You can usually find a setting in the camera's menu that allows you to turn it off. Look for "Exposure Warning" in your menus or something similar.

Oct 14, 2014 | Cameras

4 Answers

Dark Pictures


try reseting the camera back to default settings, there should be a function for that in the menus or a small reset hole somewhere in the camera.

Jul 23, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A640 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash is intermittent or doesn't flash at all. I have tried different settings and flash modes with the same results. Low light pictures that are un-usable.


First of all, be advised that flashes are designed to light people just a few meters away, so that their faces are visible at night or when there's backlighting (very bright/sunny background and dark faces). It will not, for instance, have any effect on a landscape photo taken at night.
Please check if your camera has a manual flash mode. If so, you can set it up so that the flash will fire every time. Check the user's manual for the proper procedure.

Mar 02, 2011 | Cameras

1 Answer

On lighter backgrounds the pictures have horizontal lines as shown, what is going? This only happens on light objects and backgrounds.


This can happen if the light is too bright. When you capture bright object/background, try to turn off your flash light, see if you'll get better picture.

Hope this help (^_^)

Jan 08, 2011 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W180 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why are my pictures so blurry.. HELP PLEASE!!


Hi Lindsay Davi,

First, make sure you have the file size set to the highest size and highest quality. Small file size and low quality settings produce small files with pixelization.

Second, no camera performs as well in low light as it does in bright light. It sounds like you are new to photography, so you should start out by shooting in bright light - outdoors in the sun. Once you know how to take good photos in the sun, then you can try taking photos when it is overcast, or in bright shade (on a sunny day but outside of the direct sunlight). As you develop more experience in taking photos you can try more difficult lighting situations such as indoors.

Flash lighting is difficult because the light "falls off" quickly as the distance from the flash to the subject increases. The camera's flash tries to put out enough light to illuminate both the subject closest to the camera and to also try to light the background, but this is often impossible. So the subject is too bright, and the background remains dark. If your subject is further away, the lighting evens out some. If your subject is close to the background (e.g. standing in front of a light colored wall) the camera will get the flash exposure set to a better value and the photos will come out better.

It would also help to get a book on basic photography.

Dec 26, 2008 | Nikon Coolpix S550 10 Megapixel Digital...

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash


i rally dont know, i personally always keep my flash on auto and keep the brightness auto or 50%. if this is the case, then i strongly recommend contacting Sony and asking them for a solution, or taking it down to the store you purchased it from and asking them to fix it or refund it!!!

hope this helps and sorry i couldn't help in much detail!!

keep in touch and tell us how its going

Dec 22, 2007 | Sony Cybershot S650 Digital Camera

1 Answer

CANON Rebel RTI Outdoor pictures are dark


learning to use light metering correctly can have its challenge.
the manual will guide you on how to set up to read light from the subject. spot metering a dark area will cause general overexposure, or a washed out look. spot metering a bright area will cause a dark image. if you are on spot meter and shoot two people standing together against a bright lit background, your meter will see between them if they are centered, and read all that bright background, setting the camera to a less sensitive combination of aperture / shutter speed, resulting in a dark image. use field averaging meter setting and be sure you are metering the subject and not the background. try shooting a wall that is fairly clear of other colors and uniform it light hitting it, you should have a correctly exposed image. since it works in other modes (at least 1, anyway) then it is unlikely you have an exposure compensation issue. that is the only other non defect issue that would cause your problem.
once you confirm that you have these settings correct and still get a dark image, its time to have it serviced.
good luck
mark

Sep 01, 2007 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera...

1 Answer

Why do my pictures look too dark?


You may need to use the flash. Make sure the setting is not flash off. If you're using the flash, make sure your subject is within the range of 14 feet for wide angle shots or 11 feet for telephoto shots. Use Image Expert to adjust the picture's brightness and contrast. Try adjusting the camera's exposure or sensitivity settings (use the Manual user mode). If you're taking pictures in the Manual user mode, look for the EV! warning that appears on your LCD screen when you are taking pictures out of the ideal exposure range. If you have trouble setting both the aperture and shutter speed manually, try adjusting the aperture and letting the camera choose the shutter speed with Aperture Priority mode. If you're using the macro mode to take a close-up photo, be sure to provide adequate lighting for your subject. If you're taking a picture at night and you want to light up the background as well as your subject, use the camera's slow synchronized flash mode. If you need more light, attach an optional external flash to the camera's hot shoe.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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