Question about Kenmore 62872 Electric Dryer

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Won't Dry It heats, it spins and it blows but it is not drying. I cleaned out the ducts but still nothing. When it runs nothing is being collected in the lent trap so I think it may be something wrong inside from the blower. What do you think?

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Re: Won't Dry

Try taking off the duct from the dryer, it has to be something blocking the air flow, check if the end of the dryer is trowing out air, if it is not, then you have to take it apart to see if there is an obstruction inside of it

Posted on Dec 17, 2007

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The dryer is not get hot. It take 2or 3 times ti dry the clothes

You might want to take a flashlight and check the vent and duct from the outside in. Lint will build up in the duct and vent over time. When you turn on the dryer with wet clothes in it, the lint will get damp quickly and it will dry out quickly too which make the dryer cycle shorter but not long enough to dry the clothes. Clean the vent and duct regularly and that should take care of your problem. You can buy brushes for doing this and they are not costly.

Jan 04, 2015 | Frigidaire Dryers


Dryer Takes Too Long to Dry

This advice is for problems with a dryer that runs and heats, but takes entirely too long to dry.

MOST dryer heat related problems are due to poor ventilation. As your clothes dry, warm moist air is exhausted out the dryer exhaust vent ducting. If you have any kinks, excessive bends, sags, or excessively long ducting runs, this can create choke points for lint to accumulate. Once the lint accumulates, it begins to collect moisture. As it collects moisture, it will act as a sponge and collect more lint until the dryer becomes completely clogged. Left in a clogged state, the dryer begins to overheat and dries less efficiently. You may notice longer dry times or an excessively hot dryer. Eventually the dryer heating circuits will fail which will require the replacement of failed components ($). This can also become a fire hazard if the lint becomes so backed up that it begins to collect on, or near, the heating element.

If you have not checked the dryer ventilation any time recently, now may be a good time to do so. I recommend checking it about once per season to ensure it is not obstructed. Make sure you are also using the SEMI-RIGID METAL type ducting. It resists crushing, kinking, resists heat better, and resists rodent infestation.

NOTE: If you are using plactic ducting, get rid of it. It collapses easy, rips and mice will chew right through it. Mice are notorious for building nests inside dryers. Give them a warm place with bedding material and they will make it a home.

Make sure the exhaust vent is at least 12 inches off the ground. This will deter mice and others pests (like snakes or birds) from entering the dryer exhaust from the outside. If you place a cover on the vent, make sure it is of the louvered variety. Do not use screens. They will collect lint and clog easily. Keep in mind, along with cleaning your lint trap after each load, you need to check the outside vent periodically to ensure it is not obstructed.

An easy test to determine if you have an exhaust problem is to remove the dryer vent hose from the back of the dryer. Turn the dryer on and attempt to dry a load of clothes as you normally would. The air leaving the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm (about 140 degrees). If the air flow is weak, you need to check the dryer interior. In particular, the blower fan housing. If the air flow is normal, and your clothes dry as they should, reattach the hose and run the dryer again. This time, check the exhaust vent where it exits your home. Again, the air flow should be forceful and warm. If not, you have a clog somewhere in the ventilation ducting which will require cleaning.

Check the ENTIRE run of the exhaust ducting. Make sure it is not kinked or crushed anywhere which can cut off air flow. Exhaust vent ducting that runs through attics and under crawl spaces are the worst. In an attic, air flow is forced in an upward direction in which gravity will always win. Lint will accumulate in the tubing and cause the dryer to work less effficiently. You will need to remove the dryer and clean the ducting periodically. Crawl spaces have similiar problems. If installed properly, the ducting should be suspended from the joists and not lying on the ground. However, over time lint can accumulate and cause sags. These areas will accumulate lint and eventually choke off the airflow. Again, it is recommended that you clean the ducting thoroughly each season. Leaving the ducting on the ground isn't the answer either as this gives ready access for rodents to chew through it.

In addition, many home owners unknowingly will push the dryer against the wall and crush the hose behind it. This will also clog the vent and make the dryer inefficient. Leave about a 1 foot space behind the dryer for proper ventilation and ensure the vent hose does not get crushed. Semi-rigid hose will prevent this from happening.

The general rule of thumb when it comes to dryer exhaust ventilation is the SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the run, the better. The longer the distance and the addition of more bends creates resistance and makes a dryer less efficient.

IMPORTANT: Exhausting a dryer freely into your home WITHOUT ducting (i.e., into an attic, crawl spce, or in a laundry room) is NOT recommended either. Dryer vent exhaust contains moisture. This added moisture, coupled with the warm air from the heating circuits will add humidity to your home and creates a breeding ground for mold and mildew. DO NOT run an unvented dryer in your home like this. It can become a health concern.

If you have any questions, please let me know. I have seen these problems many times. I hope this information is helpful.

on Dec 05, 2009 | Dryers

1 Answer

The dryer works fine in TimeDry mode, but in Intellidry mode it dries very slowly. The "Moisture Moniture" indicator lights start and stay at "Less Dry". I have replaced the moisture...

you could have bad gas coils.if the timer doesn't advance in auto dry most likely you're having heat problems,when the dryer heats and then the heat shuts off then the timer will advance,when the heat comes back on the timer stops,it does this until the clothes are dry.gas coils when starting to fail will work normally until they get hot and then no heat until the coils cool down then they will work again,on time dry the timer just keeps counting down until the time runs out no matter what's happening to the dryer.i've seen the coils fail after the first 10 minutes and other times for 20 to 30 minutes but usually if the load is big and in time dry the clothes will feel warm and you'll need to dry them a second time to get them fully dry,also while you're in ther you should clean out the dryer at least once a year,clean out the duct that the lint filter slides into,vacuum out the cabinet where the motor is and blow out the vent line,if it's a long run i use a leaf blower to blow out the line,remove it from the back of the dryer,stick the leaf blower into the vent line and blow it out,i've blown out birds nest out of some lines, your clothes will dry on time,you won't go through so many parts and you won't have to worry about a dryer fire,the gas coils are on top of the gas valve,remove the two phillips screws,lift off the cover and change out the time you use the dryer keep an eye on it,after it runs for 20 minutws start checking it,you'll hear a click,then another click and the flame will lite,look into the gas tube and if the flame isn't liting then you have bad gas coils.

Sep 10, 2011 | Maytag MDG7600AW Gas Dryer

1 Answer


you have to clean out the dryer,do this once a year if it's gas.unplug the dryer,remove the vent line,if it's a long run blow it out with a leaf blower,first make sure there's nothing like a screen or something on the outside duct then blow all the lint outside,next you have to clean out the duct that the lint filter slides into,then vac out the lint in the cabinet where the motor is then with a shop vac blow off the motor and blow out the cabinet and all the gas parts,do this once a year and your clothes will dry on time,your dryer parts will last longer and most of all you won't have to worry about having a lint fire

Jan 14, 2011 | Whirlpool LGR5636L Gas Dryer

1 Answer

Our Kenmore HE2 dryer seems to be taking a very long time to dry clothes (120 minutes on Medium High to dry towels/jeans) . It is producing heat, but it also seems to be producing water/steam. The filter...

you need to clean out the vent line and the dryer.unplug the dryer,pull out the filter,remove the bottom panel and then remove the duct that the lint filter slides into and clean it out,vac out the inside of the dryer,if you have a shop vac you can blow all the lint from the back and then vac it up,make sure you blow off the motor,alot of lint gets built up around and inside it,pull out the dryer and pull off the vent line,if it's a long run i use a leaf blower to blow out the vent line,first go outside and make sure the vent is clear so when you blow out the vent line nothing is blocking the lint from coming out.this will take care of your problem,do this once a year and your dryer will last longer,you'll need less parts changed out over the years because the dryer won't over heat,you'll save on electricity,your clothes willl dry on time and most of all you won't have any fires

Sep 26, 2010 | Kenmore Dryers

2 Answers

Takes 3 cycles to dry clothes

This is a potentially deadly scenario. If the clothes are warm but just not getting dry, there is a problem with air flow - specifically - the lack thereof. The chance of fire is a real concern.

Make sure the lint baffle / trap is clear. This should be checked / cleared after each drying cycle. Most folks know about this, but I included it just in case this is your first dryer.

If the the baffle / trap looks clear, the exhaust tubing of the dryer is suspect. Many installations consist of the flexible / expandable hose. This hose may have become crushed during the running of the dryer, reducing air flow. Locate the hose and pull the dryer away from the wall to inspect, expand or replace the hose as needed. If an old installation, it is very possible that the hose has become clogged with lint build up over the years. The hose should be replaced in this case.

If at all possible, use aluminum expandable dryer duct. It is less likely to collect lint as quickly as the flex plastic style.

If the clothes are not warm or hot, the heat source (electric heating element or gas flame - depending on type) has a problem. Either of these problems should probably be referred to a pro for proper repair.

Jan 20, 2010 | Kenmore Dryers

1 Answer

I have a Kenmore Elite dryer Model:110.C60952990 almost no heat.

Before assuming you may have a component failure, do a little routine inspection of the dryer and exhaust vent ducting.

If your dryer performance has been failing (i.e., clothes taking longer to dry), it may be because the exhaust ventilation ducting is clogged. If you can't remember the last time the exhaust vent was cleaned, or if it has never been done, this can contribute to dryer performance problems. All dryers need proper air flow in order to dry properly. If the ducting becomes clogged, the heating circuits will actually overheat, causing poor drying results and eventual failure. This usually results in the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) blowing or the Heating Element failing or BOTH. When these components fail, they must be replaced.

There is no lint screen that catches ALL the dryer lint. Some lint will always get exhausted with the moisture from your clothing. If the exhaust vent is kinked or has excessive bends that create choke points, lint will accumulate in these points. Once the lint starts to accumulate, the moisture from your clothes starts to collect in it, and more lint get trapped. This eventually creates a clog. The Rule of Thumb: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the exhaust ventilation ducting, the BETTER.

A simple test to determine if you have a clog somewhere is to remove the dryer hose from the back of the dryer and attempt to dry a load of clothes as you normally would. The air escaping the back of the dryer should be forceful and warm (about 140 degrees). If the air flow is normal and the clothes dry as they should, then you need to inspect the ducting thoroughly from where it leaves the dryer to where it exits your home. It should be clear with no kinks or clogs.

If your vent line runs under a crawl space make sure it is suspended above the ground and has no sags where lint could collect.

If your exhaust vent runs to an attic, this is a poor design that gravity will always win because of the resistance the blower fan meets trying to push the exhaust up the wall. The lint will eventually collect in the ducting going up the wall and have to cleaned out from time to time.

Also, make sure you don't crush the dryer hose behind the dryer when you push it up against the wall. You should always leave plenty of space behind a dryer to prevent this from happening.

Rodents and birds are anotehr cause of dryer problems. If they have access to the outside exhaust vents, birds will build nests in them and mice love a warm place with plenty of bedding material (lint makes a nice nest). Make sure the exhaust vent is at least a foot from the ground and use a louver type cover to keep pests outside. Do not use a screen. It can resist air flow and clog.

In addition, you should be using semi-rigid metal type ducting that resists kinking, crushing and rodent infestation.

If the air flow is weak, then you need to inspect the dryer INTERIOR to see if the air blower is working properly and is not clogged. It is important to keep a dryer checked routinely. Failue to do so can lead to component failures and is a potential fire hazard.

If you have questions, please let me know. I hope this helps you.

Sep 18, 2009 | Kenmore Elite HE4 Electric Dryer

1 Answer

It turns on and it heats up but it does not dry the clothes

Hello. W/D here. The problem with your dryer usually isn't too serious, and the most likely cause is easily remedied. If it'll run, and heat up, that's great. It sounds like you have a restriction in your exhaust circuit.
Unplug your dryer and scoot it out to where you can get to the vent ducting. Lots of times there are loops and humps in the ducting behind the dryer that just love to collect debris. Disconnect it and, holding the duct like a "U", take it outside and clean it out. While the duct is off, clean the dryer exhaust cavity and the vent where the dryer exhaust exits your house. Remove the lint screen and inspect/clean the cavity below it. A dryer brush (looks like a giant bottle brush, ~$10 at Lowes, H/Depot, W/Mart) is really handy for this type of cleaning. This should correct your problem.
Hope this was useful to you.
Regards, --W/D--

Jul 18, 2009 | Whirlpool LEQ8000JQ Electric Dryer

1 Answer

The drum is spinning, the heats working, not drying

Try washing both lint screens with soap and water and letting them dry.

Apr 04, 2009 | Asko T700 Electric Commercial Dryer

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