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Switch loop with mutiple fixtures

I am trying to build a switch loop that has power originating at a light fixture going to two other lights then to a switch. Can multiple lights be done with just 2 wire or will it require 3 wire?

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Here you go:

switch loop with mutiple fixtures - 016e0e5.jpg

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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Can b done with 2 black and white 1st fixture power white dont hook up till switch black line will connect to all fixtures at 1st fixture disconnect white line from white in fixture keep black hooked up than with new line connect white to power white and black to fixture white run line to next fixture cut black line black to fixture black than black to fixture white etc.. get to switch black to one side and the white to other fix1>.wwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww> switch< blkblkblk < < < fix1 > blk blk> fix2[blk2--blk] [wht2-blk]>>blkblkblk>fix3 [blk3-blk][wht3-blk blk black fed wire w white feed wire your running your fixtures on whats called a series circuit but check your fixtures and wire you dont want to exceed your wires amps

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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Hello. W/D here.

The ideal switch loop for multiple fixtures is like this: Where the power originates, run a romex 3 conductor line to the switch. Use the black wire as hot to the switch, and use the white wire as the hot return to the fixture. Mark the white wire with a band of black electrical tape to signify it as a hot return line. This line becomes the switched hot line, and the fixtures are powered from this line. All can be connected at this line, or wired in series, but all of the commons should be connected to return to the neutral bar in the panel, and all of the bare coppers should be wired together, grounding at all fixtues and switch, and return to the ground bar at the panel, then to earth.

Hope this helps, W/D

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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You are installing a two switch controlled lighting system, correct? You want to be able to turn the lights on and off at two different locations? To do this, you need a 3 wire cable, Black, White, Red, and bare Copper. Black is hot, White is neutral, and RED is the "travelling wire" connecting the two THREE way switches which control the lights from the different locations. The bare copper is the ground to the fixtures and the switches. What size lighting are you installing? You mention two other lights, are these incandesent, flourescent, or Halogen, Halide, ect? And the total watts of the lights you want to control? I need to know in order to provide the correct wire size for you. If you are just "extending" a current light fixture to two more and then want to be able to cut them all off with one switch, then you can use two wire, w/ ground.
Black is hot, White is neutral, and bare copper for ground. And one switch will control all of them. You interrrupt the circuit at the switch.

Posted on Sep 26, 2009

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