Question about Leica Trinovid BCA Binocular

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The left view extender(eye only vs. glasses)is cracked and needs to be replaced. The binoculars are Leica trinovid 10x25 BCA

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I will fix them for $75.
Regards,
James (718)578-5231

Posted on Jan 10, 2010

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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How to hold binoculars properly


1. Remove the lens covers, if they are in place.
2. Set the diopter on the right barrel eyepiece. The function of this setting is to adjust between vision differences between your eyes if you are NOT wearing corrective lenses. Set to zero if you do have corrective lenses on (glasses or contacts). For proper diopter adjustment see this article: Binocular Selection Guide.
3. Most binoculars will hinge in the middle to allow for differences in the spacing between the eyes. Set the spacing to fit your eyes.
4. Adjust eye cups. Each eyepiece will have a means of maintaining the correct eye relief for the user. On quality binoculars the rim of the eyepiece will extend and retract as you twist the eyepiece rim. Move all the way in if you are wearing eyeglasses or adjust out if not wearing eyeglasses. You will know if they are set correctly when you look through the binoculars and check to be sure that the circular edge of the view should be sharp and not fuzzy. At this point we are not looking at any object in the view but rather the perimeter of the view. You may need to adjust the eye cups again to compensate. On lower cost binoculars the eyecup may only be a rubber lip that you either fold over (the "in" position) or out.
5 Raise binoculars to your eyes and use one finger to adjust the focus wheel on the center shaft between the two barrels, until the view is in sharp focus. If viewing for extended periods you may want to keep your elbows down near your side as this will increase comfort while viewing.
Final safety tip: Do not look at the sun through binoculars.

Many people enjoy observing nature with binoculars. Having them handy is key. Hunting, astronomy, marine use, and stadium sports are a few more activities where having a pair of binoculars can make a real impact to your experience.

Mar 06, 2014 | Zeiss Optics

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I see double image unless I take the lens as close as the binoculars can go


thats how binoculars are. Yours in this case is really strong. the closer you are to something, looking at it, the more magiflyed you going to be. try view things far a distance, really far away. no more double right?
Everything you need to know to become an expert:
on this website: http://www.chuckhawks.com/binocular_basics.htm
It is surprising how many people do not know how to focus binoculars correctly. There are two common focusing systems used in binoculars.
The first is individual eyepiece focus. This system is simple to understand, and easy to manufacture. It also lends itself well to sealed optical tubes, and thus is usually the focusing system used for waterproof binoculars. Individual eyepiece focus means that to focus the binoculars to your eyes, you simply focus the left eyepiece to your left eye and the right eyepiece to your right eye. There is no centrally located focusing mechanism. It is done like this. Look at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right binocular), and focus the left eyepiece to your left eye. Close the left eye (or cover the front of the left binocular), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. You are finished, until you need to look at something at a different distance, in which case you need to repeat the process.
Because individual eyepiece focus is time-consuming, center focus is more common. Unfortunately, very few people understand how to correctly use center focus binoculars. Here is how it is done. Aim your binoculars at something in the distance. Close the right eye (or cover the front of the right tube), and focus the left side of the binocular to your left eye using the center focus control, which is concentric with the pivot shaft between the binoculars. (Note: the left eyepiece itself does not focus on center focus binoculars.) Next, close your left eye (or cover the front of the left tube), and focus the right eyepiece to your right eye. DO NOT touch the center focus control while you are focusing the right eyepiece to your right eye. Now you are finished. What you have just done is adjust the binoculars for your individual eyes. (Practically everybody's left and right eyes are different.) From now on, you only need to adjust the center focus control when you look at things at different distances. Center focus is faster and easier to use than individual eyepiece focus, once you have initially set the binoculars for your eyes.
Binoculars are commonly described by using a pair of numbers, as in "7x50" or "8x25." The first of these numbers refers to the magnification offered by the binocular. Magnification is why most people buy a pair of binoculars. In the examples above, "7x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at appear seven times closer than it does to the unaided human eye. "8x" means the binocular makes whatever you look at eight times closer than the unaided human eye. "10x" makes things look ten times closer, and so on. The first number used to describe binoculars always refers to their magnification. Common binocular magnifications are 6x, 7x, 8x, 9x, and 10x.
There are also variable power (zoom) binoculars, such as 7-21x50. These almost always perform much better at the low power setting than they do at the higher settings. This is natural, since the front objective cannot enlarge to let in more light as the power is increased, so the view gets dimmer. At 7x, the 50mm front objective provides a 7.1mm exit pupil, but at 21x, the same front objective provides only a 2.38mm exit pupil. Also, the optical quality of a zoom binocular at any given power is inferior to that of a fixed power binocular of that power. In general, zoom binoculars are not the bargain they seem to be.
Remember that everything (including movement) is magnified when you look through a pair of binoculars, especially your own shakes and tremors. So the higher the power, the harder it seems to hold the binoculars steady. 6, 7, or 8 power binoculars are easier for most people, even those with very steady hands, to hold reasonably still. The higher powers sound like a good deal, but often result in jiggly, blurred views. This is why 7x binoculars are chosen by so many experts, including the military.
Power affects brightness. Other things being equal, the higher the power, the dimmer the view. And power also affects the field of view of the binoculars. Again, everything being equal, the higher the power, the smaller the field of view. So, as you can see, power must be balanced against other desirable characteristics when choosing binoculars.

May 09, 2011 | Bushnell 240842 Binocular

2 Answers

I have a Leitz 8x20 binocular that neds new eye pieces. The rubber eye cup pieces are tearing.


The eyecups are available for free for UK residents from Leica Camera UK Ltd. just e-mail spares@leica-camera.co.uk with the model, serial number, if you require black or green and the address that you need them sent to and they should be with you in a week.

The earliest models below are no longer available but all the rest are.
8x20 C - 40300 (1975-1982) .
10x22 C - 40301 (1975-1982).

Dec 24, 2009 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

1 Answer

Eye piece needs to be replaced


You will have to send it in for repairs, binoculars are filled with nitrogen gas which will have to be replaced.
look for bushnell repairs on line. Make sure when you send them in that you also tape your name and mailing address on the binoculars to ensure you get them back. Also insure the package when sending it in the mail.

Oct 08, 2009 | Bushnell Powerview 13-9025 (10x25)...

2 Answers

Leitz Trinovid 7X35 needs new rubber eyepieces


have had nothing but excellent results when ordering eytops for leitz that i repair.. call..1 800 222 0118....x217..gl larry@reichinstruments.com

Jun 08, 2009 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

1 Answer

Need rubber eye pieces for zenith binocular


i need the software for a vivitar 10x25 binoculars

Apr 13, 2009 | Nikon Action Binoculars

3 Answers

Leitz trinovid binoculars


I am trying to get Leitz binoculars repaired. Do you know where I can send them?

Ash

Oct 15, 2007 | Zeiss Classic B/GA 524013 Binocular

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