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Defective key. I also cannot figure out how to get access to they key action. I have a bad key and I need to know how to remove keys to work with the area the key makes contact with. This is on a Yamaha PSR-510. I love this keyboard.

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SOURCE: yamaha psr-gx76

when i checked for a manual for your product it came up as musical keyboard not a computer keyboard so if it's the manaul to the muscial keyboard you want here is the link.
http://www.yamaha.co.jp/manual/english/result.php?div_code=emi
type in psr-gx76 into the search then it will show up in the results as pdf file, this is adobe file and will open with that program and most computers have it installed.
hope this helps.

Posted on Oct 14, 2008

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SOURCE: Yamaha PSR-510 Keyboard

There is no need for a manual. It is so easy to operate because it is designed for easy opeating. If you need a manual to operate the PSR-510 then you really won't be able to operate it even after studying the manual. But here it is just in case you can by some miracle!
http://www2.yamaha.co.jp/manual/pdf/emi/english/port/PSR510E.pdf

Posted on Feb 10, 2009

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Yamaha PSR 510 -- one of the white keys broke out. Need HELP!

I figured it out. Once the whole 61-key section is unscrewed (I believe its just one screw at the end and it simply lifts off) you have to take a flat head screwdriver and stick it in the top edge of the key rows and twist to force the little tabs out of the slots. Be careful because this is not easy and some of the little tabs might break off - it may not be crucial for the keys to snap back in, though. The first few black keys and the tab above are all one solid piece of plastic. All of the keys are grouped in groups of 3-5 or so as one piece. White keys are layered under the black keys so you must release black key groups to access the white key groups. Once you have forced a key group lose from its snap attachment you must also free the keys from underneath to fully lift the keys off the unit. You have to BREAK the hook shapes found on the underside of the keys (they rest up against the orange rubber lining.) Take wire cutters and snap off all the tips in the key group you wish to remove. Depress a key and watch the movement underneath if you have trouble seeing what I'm talking about - you will see the hooks - think of it as the bottom of the key because that is what it is. The piece you break off should be very small - just enough to remove the hook shape enabling you to lift the keys right out. This will not cause the keyboard to be unusable. It will only make it possible to bend the key up once everything is reassembled. It is the only way I see to free the keys and gain access to the action underneath. As for that...

The action underneath is made up of a pair of rubber cups that when pushed make contact with metal sensors. These rubber cups can tear causing them to fail to pop back up to rest position. I am trying crazy glue to see if this will repair the tear. If not then I will try double-sided tape so that the plastic key will pull the rubber cup back up with it (I hope) when released. Good luck. It is a great keyboard. Very sad to see it discontinued.

This is regarding the Yamaha PSR-510.

Posted on Sep 25, 2009

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Posted on Aug 07, 2010

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SOURCE: Do you have yamaha keyboard psr 2000 spare parts?

Can you find for me memory card for YAMAHA PORTATONE PSR 2000.

Posted on Mar 18, 2011

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C key is sunken down. The hammer action counterbalance isn't working properly


Check it again. It may have something dragging on the key, maybe something sticky like soda or juice residue. You can also try swapping out the key with another C or F key that is less used. Good luck!

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How do I replace one key?


You will need to gain access to the keybed, remove screw from back of keybed the fix it to the base of the keyboard. Slide the keybed back making a gap of about 2cm at the front of the keybed.

Look at the back of the key towards where it pivots and you will see a small arrow, push something like a credit card between the keys at this point and the key will pop up, you can then slide forward releasing the key.

If you need more info please ask.

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Yamaha keys g and c# don't work


You didn't describe your problem with enough details. If the keys operate mechanically, then the problem might be with the integrated switch assembly. You will need to disassemble the entire case enclosure to check the key assemblies. The keys are assembled into sets. You can remove the set with the bad switches and replace the entire group. In some Yamaha models you can replace individual switches ( entire key mechanism). You can also test the switches using a multimeter - simple continuity test.
If your keys are inoperable mechanically, ( won't move or move partially) you will have to disassemble the entire unit to identfy the problem. It may be a simple alignment adjustment or a broken pivot joint. You won't know for sure without removing the internals by taking it apart.
Yamaha has excellent service reps (factory trained) either in repair depots or available for house calls. Go to their web site enter your zip code to find the nearest rep. If you are not comfortable taking the keyboard apart, that is the best solution.

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Yamaha pf85 14 keys not working & two of the three circuit boards look damaged.


The PF-85 action works by having the hammers strike the contact strip, which in turn connects the trace patterns on the circuit boards you're looking at together.

Any dirt between the contact strip and the circuit board will cause the keys to not function correctly. You can remove dirt with rubbing alcohol (iso-propanol) and a cotton swab. The only thing on these boards is traces, contacts, and diodes so they are safe to handle...just don't get finger prints on the contacts.

You should also make sure that the white wires are plugged in all the way on the back of these boards. A loose connection will cause the problem you've described. As would missing screws!

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Yamaha psr 550


When PSR550 keys stop working, or are intermittent, in any arrangement, this can be fixed (with work). There is probably TINY dust or debris which prevents a clean key contact from taking place; you must unscrew and open the PSR550 up like a ****, then unfasten the bottoms of the keyboard circuit boards. You can figure out how to move them without totally disconnecting them. You will observe how a tiny rubber-mounted contact presses against an interleaved circuit-board connection pattern to make contact when a keyboard key is pressed. Any dirt or crud on the contact area of the circuit board must be removed, because it will prevent the conductive contact from bridging the circuit cleanly and fully. I used 91% alcohol and QTips to clean all contact surfaces. It took me a couple of disassemble/assemble cycles to get all the keys clean and working, and the PSR550 back together. But first download the service manual: it will show you how to open it and access various components. You will see that the keyboard switches are much like calculator buttons on a TI-83 calculator. They are pretty well enclosed, but you will see how much dust can settle in just through various humidity conditions, especially if you take it to gigs. Good Luck.

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1 Answer

The graded action has stopped working, any help greatly appreciated!


The graded action is only that there are different counterweights on the various keys. They are a sort of "J" shaped pieces of steel that vary in length. I don''t know how the graded part could stop working, as they just vary the key "feel" across the keyboard. Are you saying this key "feel" has been lost?

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Roland hp550g digital piano has a couple of dropped keys


Power off the unit. Disconnect all cables that plug into the speaker base if you have one - It may be wise to document the individual wires to make their reinstallation easier. Remove the unit from the speaker stand and lay it on the floor on something like an old towel - you may get some dark colored grease on the rug. Remove the screws only for the bottom rear, not the front - you don't need to remove them. Do this by gently turning the unit upside down. Only remove the screws from the sides/rear bottom, and note which screw types you removed from where. Once all bottom rear screws are removed gently return the unit right side up. now pivot the top rear cover - the sides of the cover are attached to the rear - pivot it toward the back. No need to remove the ribbon cables - just let the top lay there or prop it up with something if the ribbon cables don't have enough slack for the top cover to lay flat on its back. You should now be looking at all of the keys uncovered. notice the rear of each key is where it hinges. You'll notice the grease at the hinge point. The keys are thin plastic so you must take care not to damage them. The way to remove a key is to spread the ears at the hinge point of the key you want to remove. I use a screwdriver sharpened to a point, but a large pair of needle nose pliers work good too. You insert the tapered point of the tool between the ears gently to spread them far enough to just clear the pins. Once they are spread wide enough you'll feel them disengage. Each key also has two hooks located side by side towards the front of the key on the bottom side - they are not visable until the hinge is released, but you must realise they are there or you'll either snap the key back onto the hinge or not be able to pull the key out once you've got it off the hinge. Pivot the key towards you to remove it. What you now have in your hand is not the defective part. You have the top that is touched when playing the keyboard. The defective part is still setting in the mechanism. What's actually happened is the keys are made of very thin plastic where they are glued around the weight and this plastic breaks leaving the weighted end down there somewhere. Examine where the key top came from and how it works. The key top is the part you took off of the hinge. You can see how the keys on each side work and you'll also see what is missing from the mechanism for the key you're working on. To make things easier I always remove one additional key top on each side of a key that I repair to make access easier. Just place the other keys you remove right behind the key area in the order you took them off so it'll be obvious how they go back on. Now the broken weighted mechanism you can lift right out. Actually you can lift it out easier with the weighted end broken off, but once you glue it back together you can still get it in there without to much trouble. You only need to remove the damaged weighted mechanism for the key you're repairing. I remove the key tops on each side of the damaged key for visability only. Take your pair of needle nose pliers and pick out the broken end. Now fit it onto the end of the weighted mechanism in preparation for glueing - just so you can see how it's going to go on there. I use a high quality modeling super glue. Before I came across this glue I used JB Weld, but it takes a few hours to dry. The high quality super glue allows you to put everything back together immediately. Installation is reverse of removal: Snake the weighted mechanism back in once you've repaired it - you can always examine those on each side if you get confused. Hook the key top front first then smoothly snap in place the hinge ears over the pins. Make sure to check the movement of the repaired key, and check also to see if anymore keys are setting lower as they may be in process of breaking off. Once all keys are repaired, carefull lower the top rear cover onto the key assembly. While holding the cover onto the key assembly/base, gently turn the unit over onto its back and reinstall the screws. Should be all washer headed screws - do not over tighten. Check the keys again. Set the keyboard onto its base (if it came with one) and you're done. A little practice and it'll take you less than a half hour to fix the key and get it back together

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1 Answer

I have a CDP-100 and need disassembly instructions for access to internal keyboard assembly. Unit was dropped while unloading from car. Now some keys are akimbo and won't play as though they are off their...


I just fixed my CDP 100 which had a similar problem - dropped and two keys not working up one end.
1. Lay keyboard upside down on soft surface. Under keyboard is plastic cover held on by 17 screws. Remove all these and lift cover away. The metal key ends are all revealed.
2. Locate the disloged keys. Carefully press them back into position - they will "click" into place. Make sure the corresponding key on the keyboard isn't stuck in an "up" position - you may have to remove the metal key part and replace it again while making sure the key is correctly seated.
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1 Answer

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Most of the keyboard manufacturers have parts departments that can supply just the part of the keyboard you need if you can specify exactly what you want.

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1 Answer

Yamaha PSR 510 -- one of the white keys broke out. Need HELP!


I figured it out. Once the whole 61-key section is unscrewed (I believe its just one screw at the end and it simply lifts off) you have to take a flat head screwdriver and stick it in the top edge of the key rows and twist to force the little tabs out of the slots. Be careful because this is not easy and some of the little tabs might break off - it may not be crucial for the keys to snap back in, though. The first few black keys and the tab above are all one solid piece of plastic. All of the keys are grouped in groups of 3-5 or so as one piece. White keys are layered under the black keys so you must release black key groups to access the white key groups. Once you have forced a key group lose from its snap attachment you must also free the keys from underneath to fully lift the keys off the unit. You have to BREAK the hook shapes found on the underside of the keys (they rest up against the orange rubber lining.) Take wire cutters and snap off all the tips in the key group you wish to remove. Depress a key and watch the movement underneath if you have trouble seeing what I'm talking about - you will see the hooks - think of it as the bottom of the key because that is what it is. The piece you break off should be very small - just enough to remove the hook shape enabling you to lift the keys right out. This will not cause the keyboard to be unusable. It will only make it possible to bend the key up once everything is reassembled. It is the only way I see to free the keys and gain access to the action underneath. As for that...

The action underneath is made up of a pair of rubber cups that when pushed make contact with metal sensors. These rubber cups can tear causing them to fail to pop back up to rest position. I am trying crazy glue to see if this will repair the tear. If not then I will try double-sided tape so that the plastic key will pull the rubber cup back up with it (I hope) when released. Good luck. It is a great keyboard. Very sad to see it discontinued.

This is regarding the Yamaha PSR-510.

Feb 10, 2009 | Yamaha Full-Size Keyboard

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